We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (70)

Review

Extraordinary Anthropology: Transformations in the Field

“Anthropology is unquestionably a discipline with well-known intellectual traditions, or histories … [It is] not a social science tout court, but something else. What that something else is has been notoriously difficult to name, precisely...

Review by Leslie Robertson


Review

Invisible Genealogies: A History of Americanist Anthropology

IT IS FREQUENTLY asserted that contemporary anthropology is distinctive in that it represents a radical, self-conscious departure from its earlier traditions. While accepting that this orientation has been of value particularly in exposing the baggage...

Review by Michael Asch


New Media / Exhibition Review

Reflexive Anthropology on Display: Franz Boas, George Hunt, and the Co-Production of Ethnographic Knowledge

  A portion of an 1897 letter from Franz Boas to Kwagu’ł Chiefs, reproduced in English and Kwak’wala, opens The Story Box: Franz Boas, George Hunt and the Making of Anthropology, an exhibition on view...

Review by Christopher T. Green


Kwakwaka'wakw U'mista Cultural Centre Boas Franz George Hunt

Review

Constructing Cultures Then and Now: Celebrating Franz Boas and the Jesup North Pacific Expedition. Contributions to Circumpolar Anthropology, vol.4

This is a rich, edited volume on the anthropology of the North Pacific. It was produced following a 1997 conference held in New York at the American Museum of Natural History (amnh), which celebrated the centenary...

Review by David Anderson


Review

The Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia

On 23 January 2010 the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at the University of British Columbia celebrated completion of its ambitious $55.5 million “Partnership of Peoples” renewal project. The expansion included the MOA Centre for Cultural Research,...

Review by Jonathan Clapperton


Review

At the Bridge: James Teit and an Anthropology of Belonging

James Teit was an amazing community-based engaged anthropologist long before such labels were invented. Wendy Wickwire’s anthropological life story of Teit is a consummate account and indeed, as the top of page advertisement exhorts, it...

Review by Charles R. Menzies


Review

Little Bit Know Something: Stories in a Language of Anthropology

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 91/92, Autumn/Winter 1991/92

Review by Catharine McClellan


Review

Cannibal Tours and Glass Boxes: The Anthropology of Museums

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 101, Spring 1994  

Review by Douglas Cole


Review

The Pleasure of the Crown: Anthropology, Law and First Nations

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 119, Autumn 1998

Review by Joanne Drake-Terry


Review

In Twilight and in Dawn: A Biography of Diamond Jenness

At last there is a comprehensive biography of Diamond Jenness, perhaps Canada’s greatest anthropologist, and it’s an excellent one. Barnett Richling has risen to the task with a clear understanding of the man, his remarkable...

Review by Robin Ridington


Review

The W̲SÁNEĆ and Their Neighbours: Diamond Jenness on the Coast Salish of Vancouver Island, 1935

Anthropologist Rolf Knight launched a new chapter of Indigenous history in 1978 with the publication of his book, Indians at Work: An Informal History of Native Indian Labour in British Columbia, 1858-1930.[1]  In contrast to...

Review by Wendy Wickwire


Review

Voices of a Thousand People: The Makah Cultural Research Center

THE MAKAH TRIBE at Neah Bay, Washington State, has become one of the most visible and controversial Indigenous communities in North America due to the media gaze on their efforts to revive traditional whaling in...

Review by Michael Marker


Review

Rewriting Marpole: The Path to Cultural Complexity in the Gulf of Georgia Region

         Rewriting Marpole is the published version of Clark’s PhD dissertation (Clark, 2010) and an outgrowth of his MA thesis (Clark, 2000). The goal of his research “is to determine the spatial...

Review by Jesse Morin


Review

Recording Their Story: James Teit and the Tahltan

Judy Thompson, Canadian Museum of Civilization (CMC) Curator of Western Subarctic Ethnology, has produced a lavishly illustrated book, compelling for its quality of images, clarity of writing, and elegance of design. Seventy-one rarely published and...

Review by Jennifer Kramer


Review

The Contemporary Coast Salish: Essays by Bruce Granville Miller

I was a third-year undergraduate at UBC in 1990 when Bruce Miller joined the Department of Anthropology and Sociology, launching his second career after having taught high school.  Between 1991 and 1994 I took several...

Review by Brian Thom


Review

K’esu’: The Art and Life of Doug Cranmer

Jennifer Kramer’s book K’esu’: The Art and Life of Doug Cranmer was written to accompany the Museum of Anthropology’s 2012 landmark retrospective exhibit about the life and work of the internationally renowned Kwakwaka’wakw artist Doug...

Review by Carolyn Butler Palmer


Review

The Cannibal Spirit

Harry Whitehead’s novel The Cannibal Spirit fictionalizes one of the most important figures in the history of BC anthropology, Franz Boas’s long-time collaborator George Hunt. With many points of reference to Joseph Conrad’s Heart of...

Review by Judith Berman


Review

These Mysterious People: Shaping History and Archaeology in a Northwest Coast Community

In the summer of 1968, my grandmother would sometimes take my young aunt and uncle to the northern bank of the outflow of the Fraser River to dig for “Indian treasure” at the Marpole Midden....

Review by Madeline Knickerbocker


Review

Coming to Shore: Northwest Coast Ethnology, Traditions, and Visions

Coming to Shore promises to make a significant contribution to the anthropological study of the indigenous peoples and cultures of the North Pacific Coast of North America. Comprising papers from the Northwest Coast Ethnology Conference,...

Review by Robert Hancock


Review

No Longer Captives of the Past: The story of a Reconciliation on Erromango

No Longer Captives of the Past is an important book for two reasons. It offers an excellent case study of modern day reconciliation remediating past wrongs, and it reminds us how, in this interconnected world,...

Review by Jean Barman


Review

Wartime Images, Peacetime Wounds: The Media and the Gustafsen Lake Standoff

A welcome addition to the literature on Aboriginal symbolic politics and direct action in Canada, this book describes the standoff between the rcmp and a handful of Native activists and supporters at Gustafsen Lake, British...

Review by Kenneth Brealey


Review

Maps and Memes: Redrawing Culture, Place and Identity in Indigenous Communities

In this innovative and important book, Gwilyn Eades, a geographer from Terrace, undertakes a kaleidoscopic investigation of the significance of maps, cartography, contemporary geo-coding technologies (GIS, GPS, and Google Earth), and questions of spatial cognition...

Review by Daniel Clayton