We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Results (1842)

Book Review

Landscapes of Injustice: A New Perspective on the Internment and Dispossession of Japanese Canadians

In historical memory, the forced confinement and exclusion of 22,000 Japanese Canadians from 1942 to 1949 remains one of the darkest and, unfortunately, least understood chapters in Canadian history. Although the story has been told...

Review by Jonathan van Harmelen


Book Review

Cataloguing Culture: Legacies of Colonialism in Museum Documentation

As Hannah Turner points out in the introduction to her timely book, Cataloguing Culture: Legacies of Colonialism in Museum Documentation, “Museum records are often taken to be neutral or privileged sources of knowledge, but they...

Review by Joy Davis


Book Review

Decolonizing Discipline: Children, Corporal Punishment, Christian Theologies, and Reconciliation

Decolonizing Discipline is a direct response to the sixth call of action made by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission to repeal Section 43 of Canada’s criminal code, which allows corporal punishment “to correct what is...

Review by Alex Gagne


Book Review

The Object’s the Thing: The Writings of Yorke Edwards, a Pioneer of Heritage Interpretation in Canada

When we visit a nature park or a museum, do we consider how interpretation contributed to our experience? For Yorke Edwards, “the father of nature interpretation in Canada,” interpreting the object is “the thing.” As...

Review by Patricia E. Roy


Book Review

Victoria Unbuttoned: A Red-Light History of BC’s Capital City

Linda J. Eversole’s first book, Stella: Unrepentant Madam, written in 2005, was praised for its academic value and readability. The author continues her exploration of women in the sex trade with Victoria Unbuttoned, profiling ten...

Review by Janet Nicol


Book Review

Paradise Won: The Struggle to Create Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve

Knowing that Paradise Won: The Struggle to Create Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve would end in the establishment of a park offers no relief from the sense of urgency that reading the book elicits. Usually,...

Review by Madison Heslop


Book Review

Deep and Sheltered Waters: The History of Tod Inlet

In Deep and Sheltered Waters: The History of Tod Inlet, David R. Gray – with a Foreword from his long-time friends and colleagues, Nancy J. Turner and Robert D. Turner – sets out to illuminate...

Review by Jacquelyn Miller


Book Review

Big Promises, Small Government: Doing Less with Less in the BC Liberal New Era

George Abbott was a cabinet minister for twelve years in the BC Liberal governments of Gordon Campbell and Christy Clark.  In Big Promises, Small Government, he reflects on his tenure in the first Campbell government...

Review by Stephen Phillips


Book Review

The Theatre of Regret: Literature, Art, and the Politics of Reconciliation in Canada

In The Theatre of Regret: Literature, Art and the Politics of Reconciliation in Canada, David Gaertner, an academic author and settler-scholar, centres Indigenous literary and artistic works to contribute to critiques of reconciliation. The book is a...

Review by Christine Añonuevo


Book Review

Against the Current and Into the Light: Performing History and Land in Coast Salish Territories and Vancouver’s Stanley Park

Coast Salish Indigenous people never ceded their lands and resources to settlers and have always asserted their sovereignty. Over time, those assertions have taken various forms: petitions, protests, litigation. There have also been cultural assertions...

Review by Sean Kheraj


Book Review

Creating Indigenous Property: Power, Rights, and Relationships

Is it possible for two entirely different legal frameworks, built by ontologically diverse and frequently disparate parties, to coexist under one judicial system? This question would be difficult enough when considering two parties on equal...

Review by Christopher Martin


Book Review

Searching for Pitt Lake Gold: Facts and Fantasy in the Legend of Slumach

Searching for Pitt Lake Gold: Facts and Fantasy in the Legend of Slumach, from local historian Fred Braches, deconstructs the myth of Slumach’s lost gold mine. Perpetuated by a handful of “creative” journalists and seized...

Review by Alice Gorton


Book Review

Cataline: The Life of BC’s Legendary Packer

The early history of British Columbia is replete with enigmatic and unusual figures but few rival the man popularly known as Cataline. Anyone who has spent time exploring the history of the province will have...

Review by Christopher Herbert


Book Review

Go Do Some Great Thing: The Black Pioneers of British Columbia

The revised third edition of Kilian Crawford’s ground-breaking book on BC’s Black pioneers is timely and essential reading. It is a critical corrective to omissions and erasure in both academic histories and in popular understandings,...

Review by Georgia Sitara


Book Review

Kamloopa: An Indigenous Matriarch Story

The text of Kamloopa: An Indigenous Matriarch Story extends well beyond its own parameters, both literal and figurative. Syilx, Tsilhqot’in, Ktunaxa, and Dakelh playwright Kim Senklip Harvey offers a thoughtful, funny, and compelling exploration of...

Review by Theresa Warburton


Book Review

Inalienable Properties: The Political Economy of Indigenous Land Reform

In Inalienable Properties: the political economy of Indigenous land reform (2020), Jamie Baxter presents his readers with a puzzle surrounding the inalienability of Indigenous land tenure systems. Baxter asks, ‘why does inalienable property persist in...

Review by Jonathan Boron


Book Review

Captain Cook Rediscovered: Voyaging to the Icy Latitudes

On 12 July 1776 Captain James Cook, Royal Navy, sailed from Plymouth, England, in the three-master collier, Resolution, in search of the fabled Northwest Passage. It was a voyage that swept Cook and the crews...

Review by Barry Gough


Book Review

A Bounded Land: Reflections on Settler Colonialism in Canada

Historical geographer Cole Harris, professor emeritus at UBC, has in his latest book brought together a number of his articles, some previously published, to focus on the subject of settler colonialism in Canada. It is...

Review by Kenneth Favrholdt


Book Review

Civilian Internment in Canada: Histories and Legacies

“There is no single historiography of internment” in Canada, write Rhonda L. Hinter and Jim Mochoruk in the introduction of this ambitious collection of essays (9-10). Siloed histories of particular internments, they suggest, convey episodic...

Review by Jordan Stanger-Ross


Book Review

Unmooring The Komagata Maru: Charting Colonial Trajectories

From food (Valenze, 2012) to crops (Ali 2020, Rappaport 2019) to commodities (Curry-Machado, 2013) to digital cultures (Punathambekar and Mohan, 2019) and to empires (Bayly, 2003; Hopkins, 2003) there has been a steady scholarly commitment to...

Review by Dharitri Bhattacharjee


Book Review

Entering Time: The Fungus Man Platters of Charles Edenshaw

In 2013 the Vancouver Art Gallery’s Charles Edenshaw exhibition brought together three argillite platters made in the late 1880s by Da.a. xiigang, Charles Edenshaw – one from the Field Museum in Chicago, one from the...

Review by Martha Black


Book Review

Spirits of the Coast: Orcas in Science, Art and History

As I write, the world has received news that Talequah (or J35), the Southern Resident killer whale who carried her dead newborn for two weeks in 2018, is pregnant again. Spirits of the Coast: Orcas...

Review by Meghan Walley


Book Review

Complicated Simplicity: Island Life in the Pacific Northwest

Complicated Simplicity is a collection of essays, personal and expository, that explore the nature of living on secluded (non-ferry-serviced) islands within the Southwestern part of British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest (and further abroad too)....

Review by Nicholas Stanger