We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (47)

Review

Too Small to See, Too Big to Ignore: Child Health and Well-being

AS THE MOST RECENT Statistics Canada reports tell us, poverty continues to stalk British Columbia’s youngest citizens. Their distress, with outcomes measured pitilessly in shortfalls in nutrition, education, and health, is directly associated with the...

Review by Veronica Strong-Boag


Review

Human Welfare, Rights, and Social Activism: Rethinking the Legacy of J.S. Woodsworth

Human Welfare, Rights, and Social Activism is one of those unique edited volumes in which the whole is indeed greater than the sum of its parts. As suggested in the subtitle, the legacy of J.S. Woodsworth...

Review by Karen Murray


Review

People, Politics, and Child Welfare in British Columbia

This is the most important book now available on children and public policy in British Columbia. Its contributions by engaged and thoughtful scholar-advocates should be required reading for all Canadians interested in the welfare of...

Review by Veronica Strong-Boag


Review

Tax, Order, and Good Government: A New Political History of Canada, 1867-1917.

E.A Heaman has produced a decided masterpiece on a topic too often thought to be dry as a bone. Taxation, with its underlying legitimacy of consent, is the lifeblood of the state, supplying it with...

Review by Michael J. Prince


Review

Voyage Through the Past Century

First, a disclaimer: I am not now, nor have I ever been related to Cyril Belshaw. This is pertinent because Cyril — a distinguished University of British Columbia academic whose international notoriety is, shall we...

Review by John Belshaw


Review

In Plain Sight: Reflections on Life in Downtown Eastside Vancouver

As the trial of the serial killer ac cused of murdering women from the Downtown Eastside continues, the Woodward’s building on Hastings Street is turned into luxury condominiums, and the 2010 Olympics draw closer, the...

Review by Lara Campbell


New Media / Exhibition Review

Is the World Wonderful? On Judy Chartrand’s What a Wonderful World

Judy Chartrand: What a Wonderful World on view at the Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art, Vancouver, BC, 19 October 2016 – 26 March 2017. Admittedly, I was confused about where the permanent collection...

Review by Allison Adler


art

Review

Yip Sang and the First Chinese Canadians

Francis Hern’s Yip Sang and the First Chinese Canadians is the biography of a prominent merchant in Vancouver’s Chinatown in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The story begins with Yip Sang’s arrival in...

Review by LiLynn Wan


Review

Child and Family Welfare in British Columbia: A History

Child and Family Welfare in British Columbia: A History brings together a diverse range of studies conducted by practising professionals and scholars in the field of education, history of childhood and the family, social welfare,...

Review by Suzanne Smythe


Review

Street Sex Work and Canadian Cities: Resisting a Dangerous Order

Street Sex Work and Canadian Cities: Resisting a Dangerous Order aims to give voice to street-based sex workers in urban Canada, in particular Indigenous women who face intersecting stigma associated with sex work, racism, and...

Review by Cecilia Benoit


Review

A Better Place on Earth: The Search for Fairness in Super Unequal British Columbia.

This is a journalist’s book about one of the crucial issues of our time: growing inequality. As Thomas Piketty has shown in his careful study of Capital in the Twenty-First Century (2014) the tendency for...

Review by Warren Magnusson


Review

Seeking Our Eden: The Dreams and Migrations of Sarah Jameson Craig

Sarah Jameson Craig was born in 1840 in St Andrews, New Brunswick, a descendant of United Empire Loyalists, and she grew up in a log cabin in the isolated backwoods with no local post office...

Review by Lindsey McMaster


Review

War-Torn Exchanges: The Lives and Letters of Nursing Sisters Laura Holland and Mildred Forbes

For four turbulent years (June 1915 to May 1919) Nursing Sisters Laura Holland and Mildred Forbes served together in the Canadian Army Medical Corps, taking on new administrative and bedside nursing roles in joint postings...

Review by C.M. Haney


Review

Coming Home in Gold Brocade: Chinese in Early Northwest America

In Coming Home in Gold Brocade, Bennet Benson and Chuimei Ho, an anthropologist and an archaeologist/historian respectively, present results of their ambitious study of the Chinese in Northwest America — an area including Washington, Oregon,...

Review by Patricia Roy


Review

Gold Dust on His Shirt: The Story of an Immigrant Mining Family

British Columbia produces an astounding number of works on non-British immigrants on the west coast. Many recent books, such as Voices Raised in Protest (2008), The Triumph of Citizenship (2007), Nikkei Fishermen on the BC...

Review by Eva St. Jean


Review

One Native Life

For much of his life, Richard Wagamese has searched for a sense of belonging and struggled to find his identity as an indigenous person living in Canada. In One Native Life, Wagamese shares an intimate...

Review by Sean Carleton


Review

The Beggar’s Garden

When I first picked up Michael Christie’s collection of short stories, The Beggar’s Garden, I worried that it would be an overly romanticized or pitying account of the residents of Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. Yet, as...

Review by Mark Diotte


Review

Rumble Seat, A Victorian Childhood Remembered

Helen Piddington’s Rumble Seat, A Victorian Childhood Remembered is a collection of 117 brief reminiscences of the author’s childhood on southern Vancouver Island during the Depression and World War Two. Born in 1931, Piddington was...

Review by Christopher Hanna


Review

Chinese Community Leadership: Case Study of Victoria in Canada

I am particularly interested in this volume, having been born in Vancouver’s Chinatown in 1938 and having a father who was treasurer of a district association. He was a shirt tailor, and I remember in...

Review by Larry Wong


Review

Paddling Her Own Canoe: The Times and Texts of Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake)

POET, WRITER, storyteller, spokesperson, performer, actress, performance artist. Pauline Johnson is certainly the most public and popular writer that nineteenth-century Canada produced, and perhaps even the most public Canadian writer of the last century. Such...

Review by Armand Ruffo


Review

Speaking for a Long Time: Public Space and Social Memory in Vancouver

  Mike Davis claims that ours is a time when the lived geographies of privilege and marginality intersect with an ever-diminishing regularity [1]. If he is right, then critical urban research that attempts to understand how new...

Review by David Hugill


Review

Tales of Ghosts: First Nations Art in British Columbia, 1922-61

THE HISTORIOGRAPHIC trends in the scholarly literature pertaining to First Nations material and visual culture have leaned primarily towards stylistic analysis, connoisseurship, and tracing the rise, decline, and “renaissance” of this production. Ronald Hawker’s book,...

Review by Megan Smetzer


Review

The Last Suffragist Standing: The Life and Times of Laura Marshall Jamieson

Veronica Strong-Boag is one of Canada’s most distinguished women’s historians.  One of the major themes of her publishing career has been Canadian women’s struggle for the vote. Strong-Boag’s expertise in the field is very much...

Review by Lynne Marks