We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (35)

Review

Borderline Crime: Fugitive Criminals and the Challenge of the Border

Bradley Miller, an assistant professor of history at the University of British Columbia, has produced an unprecedented look at the patchwork development of the law as it pertains to the Canada-U.S. border over the course...

Review by Brandon Dimmel


Review

Vancouver Blue: A Life Against Crime

Wayne Cope joined the Vancouver Police Department (VPD) in 1975, the fulfillment of a childhood dream to be a police officer. Like most police memoirs, Cope’s is filled with anecdotal stories, some humorous and some...

Review by Bonnie Reilly Schmidt


Review

Cold Case Vancouver: The City’s Most Baffling Unsolved Murders

Eve Lazarus’s fascination with Vancouver’s history continues with her latest book, Cold Case Vancouver: The City’s Most Baffling Unsolved Murders. Crime buffs and readers interested in true crime literature or in understanding how police investigate...

Review by Bonnie Reilly Schmidt


Review

Strange Visitors: Documents in Indigenous-Settler Relations in Canada from 1876

This is a timely, thoughtful, and useful collection of primary documents on the history of the interactions among Indigenous people, non-Indigenous people, and the Canadian state. Given what is currently available, it will be invaluable...

Review by Hamar Foster


Review

A Rock Fell on the Moon: Dad and the Great Yukon Silver Ore Heist

On the surface, Alicia Priest’s memoir A Rock Fell on the Moon: Dad and the Great Yukon Silver Ore Heist is a well-researched and well-written account of Gerald H. Priest’s attempt to steal silver ore...

Review by Katharine Rollwagen


Review

In the Mind of a Mountie

T.M. “Scotty” Gardiner’s memoir, In the Mind of a Mountie, fits nicely into the genre of heroic Mountie literature that has enjoyed a popular readership since the late nineteenth century. Gardiner, who served with the...

Review by Bonnie Schmidt


Review

The Bastard of Fort Stikine: The Hudson’s Bay Company and the Murder of John McLoughlin, Jr.

  During his round-the-world voyage in 1842, Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) Governor George Simpson arrived at Fort Stikine and discovered that chief trader John McLoughlin Jr. had been killed. Two recent books discuss this event....

Review by Corey Larson


Review

A Thoroughly Wicked Woman: Murder, Perjury & Trial by Newspaper

Betty Keller has a fascination with the early social history of Vancouver that dates back at least to 1986 when she published On the Shady Side, her lively study of crooks and cops in the...

Review by Daniel Francis


Review

Vancouver Noir: 1930-1960

In the August 1946 issue of the French cinema studies journal, L’écran française, French critic Nino Frank used the term “film noir” to describe a new generation of American crime films only recently allowed into...

Review by Vanessa Colantonio


Review

Suffer the Little Children: Genocide, Indigenous Nations and the Canadian State

Tamara Starblanket is a Nehiyaw (Cree) legal scholar from Ahthakakoop First Nation and is currently the Dean of Academics at the Native Education College in Vancouver, which is located on the traditional territories of the...

Review by Carling Beninger


Review

Sensational Vancouver

Rumrunners, writers, aviators, architects, crooked cops, and killers are just some of the motley cast of characters populating Eve Lazarus’s Sensational Vancouver. This is her third local history book and a welcome addition to the...

Review by Lani Russwurm


Review

Vancouver Confidential

John Belshaw undertook the task of publishing a series of fifteen essays on Vancouver written by artists, journalists, and writers. There is no specific thesis in this collection, and no attempt to convey a specific...

Review by Marcel Martel


Review

Speaking for a Long Time: Public Space and Social Memory in Vancouver

  Mike Davis claims that ours is a time when the lived geographies of privilege and marginality intersect with an ever-diminishing regularity [1]. If he is right, then critical urban research that attempts to understand how new...

Review by David Hugill


Review

Never Shoot a Stampede Queen: A Rookie Reporter in the Cariboo

Never Shoot a Stampede Queen tells the story of a twenty-two-year-old university graduate from Vancouver adapting to life in Williams Lake in the 1980s after he accidentally landed a job there as a community newspaper...

Review by Jenny Clayton


Review

Vancouver Special

In Vancouver Special Charles Demers presents a unique portrait of his hometown of Vancouver, where he continues to live and work as a writer and a comedian. In a series of essays that explore the...

Review by Robert McDonald


Review

Policing the Fringe: The Curious Life of a Small-Town Mountie

Every province and state seems to have spawned its own popular literature about those who enforce the law and those who run afoul of it. British Columbia is no exception, but most popular histories of...

Review by Ben Bradley


Review

Aboriginal Title and Indigenous Peoples: Canada, Australia, and New Zealand

“It is inconceivable, I think,” asserted Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau in 1969, “that in a given society, one section of the society have a treaty with the other section of the society. We must be...

Review by Cairns Alan


Review

The Half-Lives of Pat Lowther

Thirty years ago, my husband and I were having dinner at the Da Tandoor restaurant in Victoria with the incomplete executive of the League of Canadian Poets. All eyes were on the door. Would Pat...

Review by Linda Rogers


Review

Westward Bound: Sex, Violence, the Law, and the Making of a Settler Society

Westward Bound is a work of remarkable scope and depth. Covering the period from 1886 to 1940, Lesley Erickson uses records from local courts, the Department of Indian Affairs, and the North West Mounted Police...

Review by Chris Herbert


Review

Negotiating Demands: The Politics of Skid Row Policing in Edinburgh, San Francisco and Vancouver

Negotiating Demands originates from Huey’s PhD dissertation of the same title completed at UBC in 2005 under the supervision of Dr. Richard Ericson, a professor of criminology and law. Unfortunately, due to the above fact,...

Review by Rick Clapton


Review

At Home with the Bella Coola Indians: T.F. Mcllwraith’s Field Letters, 1922-4

IN THE EARLY 1920s on the Northwest Coast of British Columbia, twenty-three-year-old anthropologist Thomas Forsyth Mcllwraith arrived in the Bella Coola Valley to study the small community of the Nuxalk people. He would later make...

Review by Jacinda Mack


Review

Murdering Holiness: The Trials of Franz Creffield and George Mitchell

FEW BOOK JACKETS are as striking as the one that graces Jim Philips and Rosemary Gartner’s text. Bale-fully staring back at the viewer is a prison photograph of Franz Creffield, who bears an uncanny resemblance...

Review by Angus McLaren


Review

Facing History: Portraits from Vancouver

FACING HISTORY: Portraits from Vancouver grew out of an exhibition at North Vancouver’s Presentation House Gallery, curated by the book’s editor, Karen Love. In her introductory essay, Love explains that Facing History “cannot be a portrait...

Review by Neil Sutherland


Review

A Missing Genocide and the Demonization of its Heroes

Tom Swanky’s self-published book A Missing Genocide and the Demonization of its Heroes brings into sharp focus the problems faced by historians steeped in a discipline that does not fully appreciate the culturally constructed limitations...

Review by Chris Arnett