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Single Issue

Articles

Photo Essays

photo essay

Picturing Vancouver  

By Graeme Wynn, Elvin Wyly


Terms | photography Vancouver

Research Notes

Review Essays

review essay

Vancouver in Slices

By Graeme Wynn


Book & Film Reviews

book film review

Seeing Red: A History of Natives in Canadian Newspapers

Seeing Red is a tough read. It’s tough because the sheer amount of data gathered from Canadian newspapers ends up, at times, reading like endless lists of information, rather than a coherent narrative, argument, or...

By Hadley Friedland


book film review

Swift and Strong: The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught’s Own). A Pictorial History

Having dedicated Swift and Strong “To all Dukes, past, present and future,” the authors of this outstanding volume have successfully commemorated the life and times of the British Columbia Regiment (BCR), Duke of Connaught’s Own, a Vancouver-based...

By James Wood


book film review

The Chuck Davis History of Metropolitan Vancouver

Everyone who has spent any time researching Vancouver history seems to have a Chuck Davis story. Here’s mine. It’s about 1980, I’m a callow not-easily-impressed grad student doing work on some arcane heritage tax law...

By John Belshaw


book film review

Indigenous Peoples in Liberal Democratic States: A Comparative Study of Conflict and Accommodation in Canada and India

The author is a professor of Political Science in Shillong, the capital of the tiny hill state of Magalaya in the tribal area of North Eastern India. This is a state that, by official figures,...

By Hugh Johnston


book film review

At the World’s Edge: Curt Lang’s Vancouver, 1937-1998

The historical photography section of the Vancouver Public Library is one of Vancouver’s unexplored treasure troves. Among many other gems, it holds the prints and negatives produced by seven photographers under the auspices of a...

By Bill Jeffries


book film review

Return to Northern British Columbia: A Photojournal of Frank Swannell, 1929-39

This is the third and final instalment in Jay Sherwood’s series about the work of provincial land surveyor Frank Swannell. It describes Swannell’s activities during the 1930s, including several seasons spent in areas of northern...

By Ben Bradley


book film review

Brian Jungen

The book provides an overview of the career of the artist Brian Jungen, consisting of essays by Daina Augaitis and four other notable curators — Cuauhtémoc Medina, Ralph Rugoff, Kitty Scott, and Trevor Smith. The...

By Geoffrey Carr


book film review

Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe

Most people identify Northwest Coast Aboriginal culture with the totem pole, most notably with the dramatic Thunderbird-winged carvings of the Kwakwaka’wakw Peoples. In Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe, Martine Reid and co-authors James Raffan and Michael...

By Maria Tippett


book film review

Angus McDonald of the Great Divide: The Uncommon Life of a Fur Trader 1816-1889

The Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) has been the source for North American historians since the late nineteenth century. From the beginnings of it adventures in the fur trade, the Company’s head office in London sent...

By Deidre Simmons


book film review

The British Columbia Court of Appeal: The First Hundred Years, 1910-2010

A law court has an inner life, beyond the many outside lives that it can rescue, ruin, remedy and reward. When it is an appellate court, the urge to converge as group judgment replaces the...

By DeLloyd Guth


book film review

Vancouver Noir: 1930-1960

In the August 1946 issue of the French cinema studies journal, L’écran française, French critic Nino Frank used the term “film noir” to describe a new generation of American crime films only recently allowed into...

By Vanessa Colantonio


book film review

The Development of the Fraser River Salmon Canning Industry, 1885 to 1913

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 21, Spring 1974  

By Keith Ralston


book film review

The Cannibal Spirit

Harry Whitehead’s novel The Cannibal Spirit fictionalizes one of the most important figures in the history of BC anthropology, Franz Boas’s long-time collaborator George Hunt. With many points of reference to Joseph Conrad’s Heart of...

By Judith Berman


book film review

Fred Herzog: Photographs

Vancouver photographer Fred Herzog has rapidly emerged from photographic obscurity over the past decade and now, after almost sixty years of picturing the Vancouver scene, finally has the book that he, and his images, deserve....

By Bill Jeffries


book film review

Resilience, Reciprocity and Ecological Economics: Northwest Coast Sustainability

In this brief and densely-packed treatise on why and how the aboriginal economy of the Northwest Coast worked so well, Ronald Trosper dives into the science fiction/fantasy territory: he re-imagines the clash of two competing...

By Jude Isabella


book film review

Thrown: British Columbia’s Apprentices of Bernard Leach and Their Contemporaries

  Thrown, British Columbia’s Apprentices of Bernard Leach and their Contemporaries has its origins in an exhibition at the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery at the University of British Columbia. Although every item in the 2004...

By Maria Tippett


book film review

Cultural Grammars of Nation, Diaspora, and Indigeneity in Canada

Cultural Grammars of Nation, Diaspora, and Indigeneity in Canada is a valuable contribution to an emerging discourse within the field of Indigenous Studies. It furthers a multi-disciplinary dialogue by exploring the relationships between transnationalism, diaspora,...

By Gabrielle Legault


book film review

Voyages: to the New World and Beyond

This is a book about ships, large and small, and of their experiences mainly in the line of exploration and discovery. From the mid-fifteenth to the mid-nineteenth centuries the world’s oceans and distant annexes were...

By Barry Gough


book film review

Seeing Reds: The Red Scare of 1918-1919, Canada’s First War on Terror

In Seeing Reds: The Red Scare of 1918-1919, Canada’s First War on Terror, Daniel Francis provides an overview of the response of the Canadian state and elite to the postwar labour revolt. Although written for...

By Duff Sutherland


book film review

Nature’s Northwest: The North Pacific Slope in the Twentieth Century

In Nature’s Northwest, William G. Robbins and Katrine Barber have synthesized a wealth of scholarship on the Greater Northwest, encompassing Idaho, Oregon, Washington, western Montana, and southern British Columbia. The authors track social, economic, political,...

By Richard Rajala


book film review

Searching for a Seaport: with the 1870s CPR Explorer Surveyors on the Coast of British Columbia

While researching Surveying Central British Columbia I learned that in the 1920s Frank Swannell found evidence several times of the Canadian Pacific Railway surveys which had been made through the Tweedsmuir and Chilcotin areas a...

By Jay Sherwood


book film review

Bruce McDonald’s “Hard Core Logo”

Although it’s one of the three major production sites In Canada, surprisingly few memorable movies have actually been made in Vancouver. Even lonely Winnipeg has fared better in this regard, with cinematic mythologizer Guy Maddin...

By Mark Harris


book film review

The Kelowna Story: An Okanagan History

Sharron Simpson’s The Kelowna Story offers her clear intention of providing for the people of Kelowna, most of whom are recent arrivals, “a collective memory” (9) about the origin and development of their community. Overall,...

By David Dendy


book film review

Chilliwack’s Chinatowns: A History

Writing about immigrants has long been central to Canadian historical scholarship. Today, the history of immigration also constitutes an essential element of the popular imagination in Canada and, in turn, of our sense of national...

By LiLynn Wan


book film review

The Private Journal of Captain G. H. Richards: The Vancouver Island Survey (1860-1862)

Captain (later Admiral Sir) George Henry Richards, Royal Navy, is one of the great personages of that unique era in modern history known as Pax Britannica – a period when “Britain Ruled the Waves,” and sometimes, as...

By Barry Gough


book film review

The Legendary Betty Frank: The Cariboo’s Alpine Queen

As a young girl, Betty Cox (Frank) had some very non-traditional ideas of what she wanted to be when she grew up. She dreamed of riding horses, mushing dogs, and guiding hunters in the northern...

By Judy Campbell


book film review

Sister and I from Victoria to London

In 1910, the writer and artist Emily Carr travelled with her sister Alice from Victoria, British Columbia, to London, England. Crossing Canada by train, then the Atlantic Ocean by steamer, the women encountered porcupines, antique...

By Laura Ishiguro


Contributors

Contributors

Mica Jorgenson graduated with a master’s degree in history from the University of Northern British Columbia in May 2012. Her thesis is entitled, “‘It Happened to Me in Barkerville’: Aboriginal Identity, Economy, and Law in the Cariboo Gold Rush, 1862-1900.” She has spent many years researching and writing on the environmental and First Nations history of the Barkerville/Bowron region, and she has presented her work at academic conferences across the province.

Lawrence D. Taylor is a researcher with the Departamento de Estudios Culturales at El Colegio de la Frontera Norte in Tijuana, Mexico, and he specializes in the fields of Canadian studies and the history of the US-Mexico border region. His publications include El nuevo norteamericano: Integracion continental, cultura e identidad nacional [The New North American: Continental Integration, Culture and National Identity] (Mexico City: Centro de Investigaciones sobre la America del Norte, unam/e1 Colegio de la Frontera Norte, 2001) and articles concerning the northern development policy of the Diefenbaker government. He is currently at work on books dealing with the Diefenbaker government’s National Development Programme and the National Power Grid project. He is also conducting research on the history of monorails in transportation and the use of railways in general for development projects in the north.

Christopher J. Schneider is assistant professor of sociology at the University of British Columbia, Okanagan campus. He has received awards in recognition of his teaching, research, and community service contributions to public education. His research investigates mass media messages about crime, deviance, popular music, and information technologies in everyday life. Dr. Schneider has published articles and book chapters, as well as co-authored and co-edited books, in these areas. He has given more than 250 interviews with various news media across North America.

Daniel Trottier is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Informatics and Media at Uppsala University, Sweden, where he is involved in two European Union projects on security and social media. He previously held a postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Sociology at the University of Alberta, and he obtained his PhD in sociology at Queen’s University. He is the author of Social Media as Surveillance (Surrey, UK: Ashgate, 2012) as well as numerous articles on the sociology of digital and social media.
Elvin Wyly is associate professor of geography and chair of the Urban Studies Coordinating Committee at the University of British Columbia. His teaching and research focus is on the urbanization of social inequality, housing markets, and neighbourhood change, and the politics of data and quantification. Graeme Wynn is a professor of historical geography at the University of British Columbia and editor of BC Studies. He has taught and written extensively on environmental history. Dr. Wynn has researched the development of New World societies and the environmental impacts of European expansion around the world, including in early Canada and colonial New Zealand. He is general editor of the Nature/History/ Society series at ubc Press, co-editor of the Journal of Historical Geography (published by Elsevier), and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He is currently the Brenda and David McLean Chair of Canadian Studies at the University of British Columbia.
Graeme Wynnis a professor of historical geography at the University of British Columbia and editor of BC Studies. He has taught and written extensively on environmental history. Dr. Wynn has researched the development of New World societies and the environmental impacts of European expansion around the world, including in early Canada and colonial New Zealand. He is general editor of the Nature/History/ Society series at UBC Press, co-editor of the Journal of Historical Geography (published by Elsevier), and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He is currently the Brenda and David McLean Chair of Canadian Studies at the University of British Columbia.