We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (264)

Review

Buckerfield: The Story of a Vancouver Family

Buckerfield tells the story of one of Vancouver’s most important business families. The story is structured around two narrative strands. One is the business history of the family patriarch, Edward Ernest Buckerfield, the New Brunswick-born...

Review by Robert A.J. McDonald


Review

The Mapmaker’s Eye: Douglas Thompson on the Columbia Plateau

More than an exhibition catalogue but every bit that as well, Jack Nisbet’s Mapmaker’s Eye takes its reader farther into Anglo-Welsh-Canadian explorer David Thompson’s five years (1808-12) on the Pacific Slope than has any previous...

Review by I.S. MacLaren


Review

David Douglas, a Naturalist at Work: An Illustrated Exploration across Two Centuries in the Pacific Northwest

In June 1824, the Governor and Committee of the Hudson’s Bay Company agreed to transport David Douglas, a young Scottish employee of the Horticultural Society of London to its “Columbia District,” to assist the society’s...

Review by Ted Binnema


Review

Civilizing the Wilderness: Culture and Nature in Pre-Confederation Canada and Rupert’s Land

  Newcomers to Canada and Rupert’s Land in the mid-nineteenth century brought with them an assortment of cultural baggage. A. A. den Otter reveals that the twinned concepts of “civilization” and “wilderness” formed the dominant...

Review by Jonathan Clapperton


Review

Selected Letters of A.M.A. Blanchet, Bishop of Walla Walla & Nesqualy (1846-1879)

During his long tenure as the founding Bishop of Walla Walla and of its successor diocese of Nesqualy, A.M.A. Blanchet meticulously copied (or had copied) his outgoing correspondence. Upon his retirement in 1879, nearly thirty-two...

Review by John Barker


Review

Recollecting: Lives of Aboriginal Women of the Canadian Northwest and Borderlands

This multiple award-winning collection considers Aboriginal women through a regional approach. Its essays contribute to several intersecting historiographies: women’s and gender histories, Aboriginal women’s history, and biography. Beyond these, the works are unified through their...

Review by Susan Neylan


Review

The Nature of Borders: Salmon, Boundaries, and Bandits on the Salish Sea

Lissa Wadewitz’s The Nature of Borders offers valuable insights into the shifting nature of boundaries on the Salish Sea and their significance for the Pacific salmon swimming through it. These fish traverse the sea on...

Review by Howard Stewart


Review

John Scouler (c.1804-1871) Scottish Naturalist: A Life, with Two Voyages

Less celebrated than his friend David Douglas, John Scouler was nevertheless an important scientific traveller to the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Nootka Sound, Haida Gwaii, and Observatory Inlet in 1825. Although Douglas has been...

Review by Ted Binnema


Review

A Modern Life: Art and Design in British Columbia, 1945-1960

An early and still not inappropriate epithet for Vancouver is Terminal City. This epithet denotes not only a peripheral cultural as well as a geographical location but also the city’s potential for development, despite its...

Review by Rhodri Windsor-Liscombe


Review

Voyages: to the New World and Beyond

This is a book about ships, large and small, and of their experiences mainly in the line of exploration and discovery. From the mid-fifteenth to the mid-nineteenth centuries the world’s oceans and distant annexes were...

Review by Barry Gough


Review

Good Intentions Gone Awry: Emma Crosby and the Methodist Mission on the Northwest Coast

Over the years, historians have paid only sporadic attention to Christian missionaries in British Columbia. While excellent studies periodically appear, they tend to reflect themes and approaches developed elsewhere. Good Intentions Gone Awry thus reflects...

Review by John Barker


Review

Canada’s Entrepreneurs: From the Fur Trade to the 1929 Stock Market Crash: Portraits from the Dictionary of Canadian Biography.

The editors of Canada’s Entrepreneurs assembled this book to appeal to a wide variety of Canadian readers (including non-academics), to inspire instructors to incorporate more business history into their courses, and to showcase the Dictionary...

Review by Ted Binnema


Review

Harbour City: Nanaimo in Transition, 1920-1967

Nanaimo is a perplexing place for a historian. The city’s elected officials and first Nations leaders often disregard and frequently disdain historical structures. Recently, two buildings that had been listed on the city’s heritage register...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Review

Shoot!

George Bowering’s Shoot!, originally published in 1994, is based on the historical account of the murder of officer Johnny Ussher by the McLean Gang. Ostensibly, Shoot! is a western novel that revolves around the youthful...

Review by Mark Diotte


Review

Finding Japan: Early Canadian Encounters with Asia

Finding Japan: Early Canadian Encounters with Asia depicts stories of Canadians who went to Japan, or whose lives, dreams, achievements, and failures were intimately connected to Japan. In contrast to the far more familiar experiences...

Review by Yukari Takai


Review

The Collector: David Douglas and the Natural History of the Northwest

The Horticultural Society of London demanded that David Douglas (1799-1834), their employee and North American plant hunter, keep a meticulous journal of his travels. Certainly a better field naturalist than author, Douglas refused to let...

Review by David Brownstein


Review

Canadians and the Natural Environment to the Twenty-First Century

The field of Canadian environmental history has blossomed over the past two decades. Consequently, instructors of Canadian environmental history courses are becoming increasingly spoiled with good options to choose from for course readers. In all...

Review by Jonathan Clapperton


Review

Spirit in the Grass: The Cariboo Chilcotin’s Forgotten Landscape

It is said that, in the old days, you could hear the commotion at Becher’s place as soon as your horse crested the rim of the Prairie. The old stopping house and saloon are gone...

Review by Marie Elliott


Review

Quiet Reformers: The Legacy of Early Victoria’s Bishop Edward and Mary Cridge

Edward and Mary Cridge’s life in Victoria began in 1855, when the Hudson’s Bay Company’s James Douglas still reigned supreme. By the time Edward died in 1913 the most significant sign of the HBC in...

Review by Diana Chown


Review

Pemmican Empire: Food, Trade, and the Last Bison Hunts in the North American Plains, 1780-1882

Let us get the quibbling out of the way first, lest it leave a bad taste in our mouths at the end. Cambridge University Press appears to have put little effort into indexing this volume,...

Review by Scott P. Stephen


New Media / Exhibition Review

Reflexive Anthropology on Display: Franz Boas, George Hunt, and the Co-Production of Ethnographic Knowledge

  A portion of an 1897 letter from Franz Boas to Kwagu’ł Chiefs, reproduced in English and Kwak’wala, opens The Story Box: Franz Boas, George Hunt and the Making of Anthropology, an exhibition on view...

Review by Christopher T. Green


Kwakwaka'wakw U'mista Cultural Centre Boas Franz George Hunt