We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Single Issue

Articles

article

Book & Film Reviews

book film review

Gold Dust on His Shirt: The Story of an Immigrant Mining Family

British Columbia produces an astounding number of works on non-British immigrants on the west coast. Many recent books, such as Voices Raised in Protest (2008), The Triumph of Citizenship (2007), Nikkei Fishermen on the BC...

By Eva St. Jean


book film review

The Law of the Land: The Advent of the Torrens System in Canada

In recent years both imperial historians and colonial legal historians have begun turning their attention to the networks at play within the British Empire and the transmission of information and ideas within the imperial system.[1]...

By John McLaren


book film review

Early in the Season: A British Columbia Journal

In the summer of 1968, aspiring American novelist Edward Hoagland spent seven weeks in the BC bush, interviewing locals, listening to stories, exploring highways and byways, and chronicling his experiences. He was gathering material for...

By Jonathan Peyton


book film review

Shoot!

book film review

Red Dog, Red Dog

book film review

Shoot!

George Bowering’s Shoot!, originally published in 1994, is based on the historical account of the murder of officer Johnny Ussher by the McLean Gang. Ostensibly, Shoot! is a western novel that revolves around the youthful...

By Mark Diotte


book film review

Subway under Byzantium

Vancouverites Maxine Gadd and Meredith Quartermain each pursue unique place-based poetics in recent books of poetry that deploy historical, geographical, and philosophical disciplines in ways that map specific social spaces in British Columbia. Their related...

By Jason V. Starnes


book film review

Red Dog, Red Dog

Due to the strong tourism and leisure economy of British Columbia, the Okanagan Valley has become primarily associated with orchards, beaches, and, most recently, award-winning vineyards – in short, the Okanagan Valley is synonymous with...

By Mark Diotte


book film review

A Silent Revolution? Gender and Wealth in English Canada, 1860-1930

A Silent Revolution? is a fascinating study of female capitalists in Victoria and Hamilton at the turn of the twentieth century.  Peter Baskerville employs both quantitative and qualitative methods to establish that women were willing...

By Judith Fingard


book film review

Madness, Betrayal and the Lash: The Epic Voyage of Captain George Vancouver

Madness, Betrayal and the Lash is an accessible, succinct narrative of George Vancouver’s life, focusing on the voyage he led into the Pacific in the late 18th century. Bown’s stated goal is to give Vancouver...

By Brian Richardson


book film review

Makuk: A New History of Aboriginal-White Relations

Makúk: A New History of Aboriginal-White Relations is a thorough treatment of a significant subject in BC history. Lutz has examined the history of exchanges of things, labour, and ideas between Aboriginal peoples and immigrants...

By Margaret Anderson


Contributors

Contributors

Matt Cavers recently completed an MA in geography at Queen’s University. He now lives in Gibsons, where he works as a curatorial assistant and freelance writer. His main research interest is in the ways that society and nature intersect in modern Canada.

Benjamin Isitt is Assistant Professor and Postdoctoral Fellow with the Department of History at the University of Victoria. His research on social movements in Canada and the world combines a bottom-up approach to archival records with wider geopolitical currents. A forthcoming book, From Victoria to Vladivostok, examines Canada’s forgotten Siberian Expedition of 1918-1919. A second book, Militant Minority: British Columbia Workers and the Rise of a New Left, 1948-1972, examines transitions within British Columbia’s working class during the “long boom” of North American capitalism. Dr. Isitt’s current research moves into the closing decades of the twentieth century, demonstrating how globalization and resource depletion amplified conflicts between workers and environmentalists and impacted the province’s social democratic political tradition.

Caleb Johnston is a PhD candidate at the University of British Columbia, whose research focuses on the politics of citizenship in Ahmedabad, India. He is also the artistic director of Urban Crawl, a performance company based in Vancouver, whose work explores art as a site for popular politics and physical dialogue.

Byron King Plant completed a PhD in history at the University of Saskatchewan in 2009 examining federal and provincial Indian policies in British Columbia after the Second World War. He currently is a researcher at the Legislative Library of British Columbia.

Geraldine Pratt is a Professor of Geography at the University of British Columbia. She has collaborated with the Philippine Women Centre of BC for the last 15 years, researching various aspects of a temporary foreign domestic worker program, including the marginalisation of Filipino youth. She is author of Working Feminism, co-author of Gender, Work and Space, and co-editor of the 4th and 5th editions of the Dictionary of Human Geography.

Karl Preuss earned a PhD in modern European history, with an emphasis on twentieth-century Germany, from the University of California. As part of his graduate studies, Dr. Preuss undertook research on his dissertation (on Germany and Indian nationalism before World War I) as a Fulbright-Hayes Fellow at the University of Bonn. After serving as a historian with the U.S. Air Force, Dr. Preuss returned to Canada, where he received an MA in Aboriginal studies by special arrangement with the history department at the University of Victoria. He has published articles on European history, U.S. Air Force history, and Jewish history in the American South.