We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

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Articles

Book & Film Reviews

book film review

Ethel Wilson: A Critical Biography

THE TWO THINGS about Ethel Wilson’s writing that David Stouck emphasizes in his critical biography are her ability to evoke a sense of place and her great reverence for “the English sentence.” Anyone would think...

By Misao Dean


book film review

Lelooska: The Life of a Northwest Coast Artist

IN SEPTEMBER 1996 Don “Lelooska” Smith, a highly regarded Northwest Coast artist, was laid to rest near his home in Ariel, Washington. The present volume is the result of a collaboration between Lelooska and historian...

By Melinda Jette


book film review

Making Native Space: Colonialism, Resistance, and Reserves in British Columbia

OVERVIEW  IN MAKING NATIVE SPACE, Cole Harris describes how settlers displaced Aboriginal people from their land in British Columbia,1 painstakingly documenting the creation of Indian reserves in the province from the 1830s to 1938. Informed...

By Val Napoleon


book film review

The First Russian Voyage Around the World: The Journal of Hermann Ludwig von Lowenstern (1803-1806)

THE RUSSIAN VOYAGE around the world (1803-06) recounted in this journal by the fourth officer and cartographer of the expedition’s flagship, the Nadezhda (Hope), is noteworthy on several counts. It was the country’s maiden circumnavigation...

By James Gibson


book film review

Steel Rails and Iron Men: A Pictorial History of the Kettle Valley Railway

THE DECISION of Whitecap Books to publish the first paperback edition of Steel Rails &Iron Men is appropriate and timely. Since this book appeared in cloth in 1990, the Kettle Valley Railway (the KV) has...

By Duane Thomson


book film review

Sutebusuton: A Japanese Village on the British Columbia Coast

MITSUO YESAKI was born in Steveston, known to its early Japanese-Canadian residents as Sutebusuton. He spent his early childhood there until the expulsion of Japanese Canadians from the West Coast in 1942. He is a...

By Ann Dore


book film review

Murdering Holiness: The Trials of Franz Creffield and George Mitchell

FEW BOOK JACKETS are as striking as the one that graces Jim Philips and Rosemary Gartner’s text. Bale-fully staring back at the viewer is a prison photograph of Franz Creffield, who bears an uncanny resemblance...

By Angus McLaren


book film review

American Workers, Colonial Power: Philippine Seattle and the Transpacific West, 1919-1941

THIS IS AN AMBITIOUS bookthat aims to “recontextualize, if not challenge” (9) several standard historical narratives: of the American West, of Asian American settlement, and of Filipino experiences in the United States in the early...

By Geraldine Pratt


book film review

Company Towns of the Pacific Northwest

COMPANY TOWNS – once ubiquitous across the greater North American West – usually originated in the corporate need for labour in isolated areas of resource extraction. Even those who remember favourably their experiences in company...

By William Robbins


book film review

Parallel Destinies: Canadian-American Relations West of the Rockies

THIS COLLECTION of essays came out of a 1996 conference in Seattle that celebrated the 150th anniversary of the Oregon Treaty, the agreement that largely fixed the boundary west of the Rocky Mountains between the...

By Gordon Hak


book film review

Colonization and Community: The Vancouver Island Coalfield and the Making of the British Columbian Working Class

JOHN DOUGLAS BELSHAW has provided the historical community with a well-researched, artfully written, and well-indexed account of an important aspect of Vancouver Island coalmining history: the experience of nineteenth-century British immigrant miners. He gives the...

By Lynne Bowen


book film review

Nuu-chah-nulth Voices, Histories, Objects & Journeys

NUU-CHAH-NULTH VOICES, Histories, Objects &Journeys is an anthology produced to complement Out of the Mist: HuupuKwanum—Tupaat, Treasure of the Nuu-chah-nulth Chiefs, an exhibition mounted in April 2000 by the Royal British Columbia Museum in conjunction with...

By Daniel Marshall


book film review

At Home with the Bella Coola Indians: T.F. Mcllwraith’s Field Letters, 1922-4

IN THE EARLY 1920s on the Northwest Coast of British Columbia, twenty-three-year-old anthropologist Thomas Forsyth Mcllwraith arrived in the Bella Coola Valley to study the small community of the Nuxalk people. He would later make...

By Jacinda Mack


book film review

Voices of a Thousand People: The Makah Cultural Research Center

THE MAKAH TRIBE at Neah Bay, Washington State, has become one of the most visible and controversial Indigenous communities in North America due to the media gaze on their efforts to revive traditional whaling in...

By Michael Marker


book film review

Sit Down and Drink Your Beer: Regulating Vancouver’s Beer Parlours, 1925-1954

To A YOUNG LAW TEACHER recently arrived from England in Saskatoon in the mid-sixties, the Canadian law relating to both the consumption of alcohol and gambling was odd. Why were bars shielded from the public...

By John McLaren


book film review

Constance Lindsay Skinner: Writing on the Frontier

THE SUBTITLE of this biography has several meanings. Constance Lindsay Skinner (1877-1939) lived on a variety of frontiers – geographical, social, literary, and imaginative. Skinner occupies a minor place in the canon of American literature...

By Margaret Prang


book film review

Sojourning Sisters: The Lives and Letters of Jessie and Annie McQueen

JEAN BARMAN’S Soujourning Sisters is an important book that merits a wide audience, consisting of both those interested specifically in British Columbia and those interested in Canadian history writ large. It recasts the notion of...

By Suzanne Morton


Audio Article

Contributors

Contributors

Nathan J. Young is a graduate student and Killam Predoctoral Fellow in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at the University of British Columbia.

Robert Campbell teaches Canadian history at Capilano College. He is the author of numerous articles and two books on regulation of liquor.

Christopher Dummitt is a doctoral candidate at Simon Fraser University. “Risk on the Rocks” is part of a larger work on the connections between ideas of masculinity and the experience of modernity in postwar Vancouver.

Karen Routledge recently completed her MA in History at SFU and is currently a PhD student at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey.