We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (46)

Book Review

Iroquois in the West

Sometimes the most detailed and poignant histories emerge from historical fragments. In Iroquois in the West Jean Barman uses what she calls “slivers of stories from the shadows of the past” to tell a rich...

Review by Dane Allard


Book Review

Gold Rush Manliness: Race and Gender on the Pacific Slope

Ten years and many miles separated two distinct, yet in some ways similar, gold rushes. In 1848, rumors of gold at Sutter’s Mill sparked a process that would lure roughly 265,000 people to California, a...

Review by Alice Gorton


Book Review

Apples, etc. An Artist’s Memoir

Apples, etc. An Artist’s Memoir by Gathie Falk, edited by Robin Laurence, is an account of the acclaimed Vancouver-based artist’s life that offers new insight into her tenacious experimentation with the ordinary. Like a grocery list...

Review by Caitlin Chaisson


Book Review

Asian Canadian Studies Reader

This collection of essays is an integral part of American-modelled activism to establish a collective scholarly field for Asian Canadians beyond national boundaries. Such trials, as the editors argue, have already been initiated, for example,...

Review by Aya Fujiwara


Book Review

Engaging the Line: How the Great War Shaped the Canada-US Border 

That the Great War changed boundaries and upset communities is not news to anyone who looks at an historical atlas of Europe.  That the war affected communities living along what is often referred to as ‘the...

Review by Chris Leach


Book Review

Maximum Canada: Why 35 Million Canadians Are Not Enough

Anyone with even the most superficial knowledge of eugenics, racism, the ‘domestication’ of women, and the history of the 20th century will know why pronatalism might ring the wrong bells. And this is setting aside...

Review by John Douglas Belshaw


Book Review

Borderline Crime: Fugitive Criminals and the Challenge of the Border

Bradley Miller, an assistant professor of history at the University of British Columbia, has produced an unprecedented look at the patchwork development of the law as it pertains to the Canada-U.S. border over the course...

Review by Brandon Dimmel


Book Review

Great Fortune Dream: The Struggles and Triumphs of Chinese Settlers in Canada, 1858-1966

David Chuenyan Lai and Ding Guo’s Great Fortune Dream is a comprehensive history of the Chinese in Canada, from early settlement to the 1960s. While much has been written on the subject, there have been...

Review by LiLynn Wan


Book Review

The Amazing Mazie Baker: The Squamish Nation’s Warrior Elder

I grew up ten minutes away from Eslha7án, the Mission Indian Reserve, in what is today known as North Vancouver, which is part of the territory of the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Úxwumixw or Squamish Nation. Yet I...

Review by Sean Carleton


Book Review

Unfree Labour?: Struggles of Migrant and Immigrant Workers in Canada

Canada has a long history of reliance on the labour of both permanent immigrants and migrant workers. In recent decades, the number of migrant workers entering Canada has increased significantly relative to permanent immigrants. A...

Review by Sarah Marsden


Book Review

The Voyage of the Komagata Maru: The Sikh Challenge to Canada’s Colour Bar

It was with great anticipation that those of us who study South Asian migration to Canada have awaited the expanded and revised version of Hugh Johnston’s The Voyage of the Komagata Maru. Johnston’s original monograph...

Review by Sharanjit Kaur Sandhra


Book Review

An Archaeology of Asian Transnationalism

Although descriptive work on historic artifacts of Asian origin has been sporadically produced by American archaeologists since the 1960s, and by British Columbia archaeologists since the 1970s, recent years have seen a blossoming of Asian...

Review by Grant Ross Keddie


Book Review

Welcome to Resisterville: American Dissidents in British Columbia

Just about every kid who grew up in British Columbia in the 1980s had a friend (or a friend of a friend) whose parents were American immigrants. Their parents usually arrived in the province sometime...

Review by Sean Kheraj


Book Review

The Punjabis in British Columbia: Location, Labour, First Nations, and Multiculturalism

Kamala Elizabeth Nayar’s groundbreaking work, The Punjabis in British Columbia, represents a significant addition to a number of fields. At a basic level, it focuses on the important but sorely understudied community of Punjabis who...

Review by Anne Murphy


Book Review

Marjorie Too Afraid To Cry: A Home Child Experience

The Prince of Wales Fairbridge Farm School was located near Duncan, British Columbia. Between 1935 and 1950 it accommodated over three hundred underprivileged British children. Marjorie Arnison was one of them. She arrived at the...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Book Review

Mnemonic: A Book of Trees

In Mnemonic: A Book of Trees Teresa Kishkan explores how our concept of self is intimately connected to the places we have experienced. Kishkan describes how places are sensed and experienced, and how these place-specific...

Review by Lauren Harding


Book Review

Orienting Canada: Race, Empire and the Transpacific

The history of Canada’s Pacific relations has long been a neglected subject. The general consensus was that Pacific relations were not central to understanding the history of the country and its place in the world....

Review by Laura Madokoro


Book Review

Jewels of the Qila: The Remarkable Story of an Indo-Canadian Family

Jewels of the Qila: The Remarkable Story of an Indo-Canadian Family, finds Hugh Johnston, the leading expert on early South Asian migration to Canada, on familiar terrain. This time Johnston provides a rare familial and...

Review by Ali Kazimi


Book Review

Dim Sum Stories: A Chinatown Childhood

Vancouver’s Chinatown has been the subject of numerous notable academic studies, providing a focus that has proven to be essential to the Canadian historical narrative. In analyzing the history of Vancouver’s Chinatown, scholars have made...

Review by LiLynn Wan


Book Review

Lillian Alling: The Journey Home

In 1929, Lillian Alling reached the coast of Alaska on her way to Siberia. Her three-year walk across North America began in New York City and ended at Cape Wales where her footsteps disappeared after...

Review by PearlAnn Reichwein


Book Review

Geography of British Columbia: People and Landscapes in Transition 3rd Edition

I was intrigued by this textbook and agreed to review it for two reasons: first, because it is more than fifteen years since I lived in British Columbia and I was keen to discover how...

Review by Daniel Clayton


Book Review

Whoever Gives us Bread: The Story of Italians in British Columbia

More than twenty years ago, Gabriele Scardellato lamented the dearth of attention to Italian Canadians living “beyond the frozen wastes” (Scardellato 1989). There have been modest advances since that time, including Patricia K. Wood’s Nationalism...

Review by Stephen Fielding