We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (337)

new media review

A Tradition of Evolution: The Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival

Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival: Vancouver, British Columbia, 25-26 May 2017. The festival featured film and new media presentations, including a “Turtle Island Shorts” program (May 26); VR and augmented reality presentations (May 27); and...

Review by Carleigh Baker


aboriginal art

Review

Ancient Pathways, Ancestral Knowledge: Ethnobotany and Ecological Wisdom of Indigenous Peoples of Northwestern North America

Nancy Turner’s new work Ancient Pathways, Ancestral Knowledge is undoubtedly her magnum opus. It is a thing of great scope, beauty, eloquence, and cohesion. Yet perhaps its greatest attribute, like all of Turner’s work, is...

Review by Natasha Lyons


Review

Wicihitowin: Aboriginal Social Work in Canada

“Wicihitowin” is a Cree word that describes the collective processes involved in helping/sharing with one another, and that is what the eleven First Nations, Métis, and Inuit social work educators across Canada have done with...

Review by Shelly Johnson


Review

Coasts Under Stress: Restructuring and Social-Ecological Health

Resilience. This is a word that, for me, conjures up a feeling of hard times met with bald-faced determination to get through whatever comes one’s way. Coasts under Stress brings this idea to life through...

Review by Tracy Summerville


Review

Mapping my Way Home: A Gitxsan History

British Columbians may be familiar with the landmark Delgamuukw case (Supreme Ct. of Canada, 1997), which established that testimony on based upon traditional knowledge and oral history is valid evidence. But most are limited in...

Review by Jillian Ridington


Review

Creating Space: My Life and Work in Indigenous Education

There is no such thing as Indigenous education. There is only cross-cultural education containing negotiations between both Indigenous people and the settler societies that colonized them. Understanding the past is essential, but even if we...

Review by Michael Marker


Review

Aboriginal Peoples and Forest Lands in Canada

Forests, long of economic and socio-cultural importance to both Aboriginal peoples and settlers in Canada, have also been sites of contention between these groups, reflected in blockades, court action, and state policies intended to address...

Review by Brian Egan


Review

Saanich Ethnobotany: Culturally Important Plants of the WSANEC People

In Saanich Ethnobotany, Nancy Turner and Richard Hebda describe the land and vegetation of W̱SÁNEĆ (Saanich), examine the “many interrelationships between people and plants” (11), and explore the traditional ecological knowledge that allowed local First...

Review by Andrew Cienski


Review

Learning and Teaching Together: Weaving Indigenous Ways of Knowing into Education

Students must become aware of how ambition, self-gratification, power, and control as purposes for learning are forms of self-deception that must be avoided because they lead eventually to the misuse of knowledge and the further...

Review by Michael Marker


Review

Switchbacks: Art, Ownership and Nuxalk National Identity

Jennifer Kramer’s book describes some recent negotiations of public representation and the incipient construction of national identity through the disposition of works of art by the Nuxalk people of Bella Coola, British Columbia. This book...

Review by Judith Ostrowitz


Review

Plants of Haida Gwaii

FOR THOSE SCHOLARS conducting research within First Nations communities at this postcolonial moment in academic history, old rules do not apply. One must navigate a rearranged landscape made up of new challenges and opportunities. First...

Review by Douglas Deur


Review

Reserve Memories: The Power of the Past in a Chilcotin Community

THE CURRENT POLITICAL climate in British Columbia is one that seeks to resolve Aboriginal legal entitlements and treaty rights through verification of precolonial practices and residency. Since 2000, when the so-called modern-day treaty process was...

Review by Jo-Anne Fiske


Review

Raven Travelling: Two Centuries of Haida Art

A book of this kind – large and sumptuous, rich with colour photo graphs of historical and more recent Haida art from the Northwest Coast, and featuring a dozen essays by Haida and non-Native contributors...

Review by Karen Duffek


Review

Gathering Places: Aboriginal and Fur Trade Histories

Academic publishers seem to be shying away from festschriften these days, but there are good reasons for UBC Press to buck that trend with this book. The long-standing academic tradition of a scholar’s colleagues and...

Review by Scott Stephen


Review

Asserting Native Resilience: Pacific Rim Indigenous Nations Face the Climate Crisis

For the past five centuries, Indigenous people of the Pacific Rim have been on the receiving, destructive end of European expansion and technology, witnessing their lands occupied by extractive, industrialized nation states. Now assimilated into...

Review by Chris Arnett


Review

Northwest Coast: Archaeology as Deep History

The Society for American Archaeology website describes their “Contemporary Perspectives” series, in which Northwest Coast is the second title, as “short volumes focused on the archaeology of a specific region.” Aimed at “busy professionals and...

Review by Alan McMillan


Review

Voices of a Thousand People: The Makah Cultural Research Center

THE MAKAH TRIBE at Neah Bay, Washington State, has become one of the most visible and controversial Indigenous communities in North America due to the media gaze on their efforts to revive traditional whaling in...

Review by Michael Marker


Review

Extraordinary Anthropology: Transformations in the Field

“Anthropology is unquestionably a discipline with well-known intellectual traditions, or histories … [It is] not a social science tout court, but something else. What that something else is has been notoriously difficult to name, precisely...

Review by Leslie Robertson


Review

States of Nature: Conserving Canada’s Wildlife in the Twentieth Century

The publication of Tina Loo’s States of Nature: Conserving Canada’s Wildlife in the Twentieth Century marks the coming of age of the field of Canadian environmental history. In some respects, this statement may seem over...

Review by Billy Parenteau


photo essay