We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (55)

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Now Is the Time

In the extraordinary short film Now Is the Time, Haida filmmaker Christopher Auchter brings to the screen a moving story of renewal through the restoration and re-editing of footage from the National Film Board of...

Review by Kristin L. Dowell


museums repatriation aboriginal self government colonialism settler colonialism aboriginal art aboriginal rights Haida Indigenous worlds

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Vancouver: No Fixed Address

What stays with you after watching Charles Wilkinson’s new documentary, Vancouver: No Fixed Address, is its beautiful cinematography. Vancouver’s ideal location at the intersection of the ocean, the mountains, and the sky is captured brilliantly: every shot...

Review by Patricia Wood


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Monkey Beach

Cree and Métis director Loretta Todd’s Monkey Beach is a long-awaited adaptation of Haisla and Heitsulk writer Eden Robinson’s classic novel of the same name. And, in many ways, the film doesn’t disappoint. In Todd’s...

Review by Theresa Warburton


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Celebrating the Indigenous-Filipino Community on Bainbridge Island and the Indigenous Women Who Brought it into Being: A Review of Honor Thy Mother

The field of Indigenous studies is being called on with urgency to listen to, center, and amplify the voices and experiences of multiracial, multiethnic Indigenous community members beyond whiteness, especially the important voices and experiences...

Review by Ashley Caranto Morford


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Uninterrupted

Editorial note: Uninterrupted is reviewed here following its role as inspiration for a nightly ‘cinematic spectacle’ on Vancouver’s Cambie Street Bridge during the summer of 2017 (see uninterrupted.ca). Uninterrupted, a film about a very special...

Review by Nick Stanger


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

A Tradition of Evolution: The Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival

Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival: Vancouver, British Columbia, 25-26 May 2017. The festival featured film and new media presentations, including a “Turtle Island Shorts” program (May 26); VR and augmented reality presentations (May 27); and...

Review by Carleigh Baker


aboriginal art

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Screen Sovereignty: Indigenous Matriarch 4 Articulating the Future of Indigenous VR

 Indigenous matriarchs are changing the culture of the technology industry through virtual reality (VR). Indigenous Matriarch 4 (IM4) is the first Indigenous virtual reality media lab and is situated on the West Coast. Currently, it...

Review by Courteney Morin


new media technology virtual reality aboriginal art

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Konelīne: our land beautiful

Winner of the Best Canadian Feature at the 2016 Hot Docs Festival, Nettie Wild’s Konelīne: our land beautiful weaves together stories of humanity’s relationships with industry, the wilderness, and nature in Northwestern British Columbia. Telling...

Review by Matthew Gartner


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Konelīne: our land beautiful

As the language and culture director for the Tahltan Nation and a Tahltan academic, I believe giving voice to our people is crucial. Until recent times, the academy has privileged the voices of settlers and...

Review by Matthew Gartner


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

When the City Sleeps, We Dream of Disruption: A Review of Lisa Jackson’s Transmissions Exhibition

Lisa Jackson’s exhibition entitled Transmissions premiered at the Simon Fraser University’s Vancouver campus from 6–28 September 2019. This new body of work weaves interdisciplinary themes regarding society, nature, Indigenous languages, and ecological futures. Lisa Jackson is Anishinaabe from the Aamjiwnaang First Nation and...

Review by Karlene Harvey


Aboriginal languages environment urbanization

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open 

Though many will recognize Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers for her remarkable body of short and documentary films (Bloodland [2011], A Red Girl’s Reasoning [2012], Bihttoš [2014], cəsnaʔəm, the city before the city [2017]), The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open (2019)...

Review by Karrmen Crey


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Pop Culture Confronts British Columbia’s Colonial History

Grand Theft Terra Firma: A Game of Imperial Stickup, Abbotsford, British Columbia, the Reach Gallery Museum, 17 January – 7 May 2017. The exhibition is augmented by several public events, including a live theatrical performance...

Review by Erika Balcombe


Book Review

Indigenous Repatriation Handbook

The First Peoples of the Pacific Coast are at the forefront of Indigenous Museology and Repatriation Scholarship. While some communities might be just starting to tangle with the complex politics and strategies of claiming back...

Review by Anna De Aguayo


Book Review

Mudflat Dreaming: Waterfront Battles and the Squatters Who Fought them in 1970s Vancouver

Liminal spaces make places. This is the central theme of Jean Walton’s book, Mudflat Dreaming, an unconventional work of literary nonfiction that weaves together memoir, film studies, and Vancouver history in the 1970s, a pivotal...

Review by Kaden Jelsing


Book Review

Water Rites: Reimagining Water in the West

In Water Rites: Reimagining Water in the West, editor Jim Ellis has assembled scholarly writing, insightful commentary, and engaging visual imagery to better understand the myriad human connections to water in Alberta. Though geographically focused in...

Review by Zander Albertson


Book Review

Maker of Monsters: The Extraordinary Life of Beau Dick

The recent passing of Beau Dick makes this documentary film both a testament and an affirmation of an extraordinary life. More than a recitation of the chronology of his life, the filmmakers have created a...

Review by Michelle McGeough


Book Review

The W̲SÁNEĆ and Their Neighbours: Diamond Jenness on the Coast Salish of Vancouver Island, 1935

Anthropologist Rolf Knight launched a new chapter of Indigenous history in 1978 with the publication of his book, Indians at Work: An Informal History of Native Indian Labour in British Columbia, 1858-1930.[1]  In contrast to...

Review by Wendy Wickwire


Book Review

Tax, Order, and Good Government: A New Political History of Canada, 1867-1917.

E.A Heaman has produced a decided masterpiece on a topic too often thought to be dry as a bone. Taxation, with its underlying legitimacy of consent, is the lifeblood of the state, supplying it with...

Review by Michael J. Prince


Book Review

Museums and the Past: Constructing Historical Consciousness

Museums and the Past opens with a statement that “‘museums’ and ‘historical consciousness’ dovetail almost intuitively” (3). I don’t think they do, and this book does not convince me. The editors offer a couple of...

Review by Alan Gordon


Book Review

Landscapes of War and Memory: The Two World Wars in Canadian Literature and the Arts, 1977–2007

In Jack Hodgins’s Broken Ground (1998), memories of the Great War haunt the fictional community of Portuguese Creek on Vancouver Island, but what should be remembered of the horrors of France remains uncertain. The notebook...

Review by Nicholas Bradley


Book Review

Home, Work, and Play: Situating Canadian Social History, Third Edition

Home, Work, and Play is a reader designed for university or college students studying Canadian social history. The editors have put together a diverse collection that can be used at any level from a second...

Review by John-Henry Harter