We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (45)

Book Review

Gold Rush Manliness: Race and Gender on the Pacific Slope

Ten years and many miles separated two distinct, yet in some ways similar, gold rushes. In 1848, rumors of gold at Sutter’s Mill sparked a process that would lure roughly 265,000 people to California, a...

Review by Alice Gorton


Book Review

Selling Out or Buying In? Debating Consumerism in Vancouver and Victoria, 1945-1985

Today we live in a consumer-oriented culture in which material items help to define who we are, or, who we want to be. To meet our material needs, stores are now open seven days a...

Review by Dr. Matthew J. Bellamy


Book Review

Witness to Loss

Witness to Loss is a multi-authored study of wartime Japanese Canadian confinement that draws from the memoirs of Kishizo Kimura, a Japanese-born man who immigrated to Canada in 1911. Kimura had an important impact on the...

Review by Christian Roy


Book Review

Not Fit to Stay: Public Health Panics and South Asian Exclusion

In the spring of 2018, hundreds of people gathered between city hall and the public library in downtown Bellingham, Washington, to witness the dedication of a 10-ton granite “Arch of Reconciliation,” a monument to and...

Review by Jennifer Seltz


Book Review

The Right Relationship: Reimagining the Implementation of Historical Treaties

In the 1764 Treaty of Niagara, representatives of the British Crown met with a gathering of more than two thousand Indigenous leaders and committed that North American settlement would only proceed with Indigenous consent. At...

Review by Tyler McCreary


Book Review

Not My Fate: The Story of a Nisga’a Survivor

Not My Fate: The Story of a Nisga’a Survivor is Janet Romain’s account of the life of her friend and fellow northerner, Josephine Caplin.[1]  Jo was born in Smithers to a Nisga’a mother and non-Aboriginal...

Review by Carole Blackburn


Book Review

Tax, Order, and Good Government: A New Political History of Canada, 1867-1917.

E.A Heaman has produced a decided masterpiece on a topic too often thought to be dry as a bone. Taxation, with its underlying legitimacy of consent, is the lifeblood of the state, supplying it with...

Review by Michael J. Prince


Book Review

Tending the Student Body: Youth, Health, and the Modern University

This fine piece of work provides new insights into the way the nature and culture of life in Canadian universities changed during the first sixty years of the twentieth century. Based on a careful review...

Review by Donald Fisher


Book Review

The Contemporary Coast Salish: Essays by Bruce Granville Miller

I was a third-year undergraduate at UBC in 1990 when Bruce Miller joined the Department of Anthropology and Sociology, launching his second career after having taught high school.  Between 1991 and 1994 I took several...

Review by Brian Thom


Book Review

Points of Entry: How Canada’s Immigration Officers Decide Who Gets In

Though less controversial than in many other countries, admission of immigrants and refugees to Canada not infrequently raises protests of “too many” or “too few” from partisan commentators, and sensationalised media accounts of particular entry...

Review by David Ley


Book Review

Allied Power: Mobilizing Hydro-electricity during Canada’s Second World War

In Allied Power, Matthew Evenden expertly demonstrates how private and public power commissions and corporations throughout Canada expanded hydro-electric capacity in response to the ballooning demands for power and production during the Second World War....

Review by Jonathan McQuarrie


Book Review

French Canadians, Furs, and Indigenous Women in the Making of the Pacific Northwest

Since the sixteenth century, intrepid French Canadians have traversed the North American landscape to the very edges of the continent, and established families and communities in virtually every region north of Mexico. Given this legacy...

Review by Heather Devine


Book Review

He Moved a Mountain: The Life of Frank Calder and the Nisga’a Land Claims Award

Like others over the course of history who have influenced fundamental human rights change, Frank Arthur Calder seems to have been born to that grand purpose. Calder’s Nisga’a elders accurately foresaw that he was destined...

Review by Katherine Palmer Gordon


Book Review

“Metis:” Race, Recognition, and the Struggle for Indigenous Peoplehood

In “Métis,” Chris Andersen highlights the widespread marginalization of Métis peoples by taking to task the continued racialization of the term “Métis.” Systematically unpacking the ways in which the word “Métis” has been misrecognized and...

Review by Gabrielle Legault


Book Review

For King and Kanata: Canadian Indians and the First World War

Exploring the participation of Canadian First Nations in the First World War, Timothy Winegard takes aim at two historiographical problems: the tendency to simply insert Aboriginal military contributions where they have been otherwise ignored, and...

Review by Sarah Nickel


Book Review

Cartographies of Violence: Japanese Canadian Women, Memory, and the Subjects of the Internment

In the second chapter of her powerful book, Mona Oikawa indicts the critical reception of well-known Japanese-Canadian representations of Internment. Readings of Muriel Kitagawa’s This is My Own, for example, have tended to “exceptionalize” it...

Review by Jordan Stanger-Ross