We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (226)

Review

Writing the Body in Motion: A Critical Anthology on Canadian Sport Literature

Writing the Body in Motion, edited by BC writers and literary scholars Angie Abdou and Jamie Dopp, is an introduction and literary companion for readers wishing to delve into Canadian sports literature.  The book is...

Review by Tyree McCrackin


Review

Encyclopedia of Literature in Canada

THE TASK APPEARS straightforward – in this case, to read W.H. New’s monumental Encyclopedia ofLiterature in Canada for information on BC writing. There is, usefully, an entry on British Columbia (unsigned, meaning “written by New”):...

Review by Richard Lane


Review

Landscapes of War and Memory: The Two World Wars in Canadian Literature and the Arts, 1977–2007

In Jack Hodgins’s Broken Ground (1998), memories of the Great War haunt the fictional community of Portuguese Creek on Vancouver Island, but what should be remembered of the horrors of France remains uncertain. The notebook...

Review by Nicholas Bradley


Review

Comrades and Critics: Women, Literature, and the Left in 1930s Canada

Canada’s best-known female literary writers from the 1930s are all closely associated with British Columbia: activist wordsmith Dorothy Livesay, then a member of the Communist Party, who first moved to Vancouver in 1936; Anne Marriott,...

Review by Carole Gerson


Review

Bluesprint: Black British Columbian Literature and Culture

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 136, Winter 2002  

Review by Sneja Gunew


Review

Catching the Torch: Contemporary Canadian Literary Responses to World War I

Neta Gordon’s Catching the Torch: Contemporary Canadian Literary Responses to World War I is a firmly contemporary study of the notion of the Great War in modern memory: that is, the First World War’s imaginative...

Review by James Gifford


Review

Masterworks of the Classical Haida Mythtellers

THE IDEA OF a story being as sharp as a knife, which is the title of Robert Bringhurst’s astonishing introduction to the works of classical Haida poets, is a useful proposition to consider in order...

Review by Terry Glavin


Review

Paddling Her Own Canoe: The Times and Texts of Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake)

POET, WRITER, storyteller, spokesperson, performer, actress, performance artist. Pauline Johnson is certainly the most public and popular writer that nineteenth-century Canada produced, and perhaps even the most public Canadian writer of the last century. Such...

Review by Armand Ruffo


Review

First Invaders: The Literary Origins of British Columbia

Alan Twigg is the publisher of BC BookWorld, which plays an important role in the literary life of British Columbia, and the author of eight previous books, chiefly on literature and politics. First Invaders is...

Review by Daniel Clayton


Review

The Heavens are Changing: Nineteenth-Century Protestant Missions and Tsimshian Christianity

WRITING IN Moon of Wintertime: Missionaries and the Indians of Canada in Encounter since 1534 (University of Toronto Press, 1984, 250) of seventeenth-century Jesuit missions to the Huron, John Webster Grant quoted a Huron man...

Review by J.R. Miller


Review

Regulating Lives: Historical Essays on the State, Society, the Individual, and the Law

REGULATING LIVES adds to a rapidly growing body of work in Canadian legal history and in the history of moral regulation. The collection should be of great interest to historians of the family, gender, race...

Review by Catherine Carstairs


Review

Contesting White Supremacy: School Segregation, Anti-Racism, and the Making of Chinese Canadians

In September 1922, the Victoria, B.C. school board ordered 155 Chinese children (97 were Canadian-born and many spoke only English) to leave its regular elementary schools and move to segregated schools which only they would...

Review by Patricia Roy


Review

The Reluctant Land: Society, Space, and Environment in Canada before Confederation

This ambitious book takes up the daunting challenge of surveying Canada’s evolution from the 1500s to the 1870s. Cole Harris’ long and distinguished career as a historical geographer with exceptionally wide-ranging interests provide him with...

Review by Allan Greer


Review

Makuk: A New History of Aboriginal-White Relations

Makúk: A New History of Aboriginal-White Relations is a thorough treatment of a significant subject in BC history. Lutz has examined the history of exchanges of things, labour, and ideas between Aboriginal peoples and immigrants...

Review by Margaret Anderson


Review

A Political Space: Reading the Global through Clayoquot Sound

Clayoquot Sound. Home of the Nu-Chah-Nuulth First Nation for thousands of years. Home of loggers and fishers who have contributed to a global market for wood and fish products for decades. Home to scenic fjords,...

Review by David Tindall


Review

Mountains So Sublime: Nineteenth-Century British Travellers and the Lure of the Rocky Mountain West

Mountains So Sublime is a thoughtful study of the reactions of Victorian British travellers to the Rocky Mountain West, as expressed through their published travelogues and unpublished diaries and reminiscences. Recently retired from a long...

Review by Forrest Pass


Review

The Pacific Muse: Exotic Femininity and the Colonial Pacific

In their recent edited collection, Bodies in Contact: Rethinking Colonial Encounters in World History (2005), Tony Ballantyne and Antoinette Burton call for a renewed focus on gender as a category of historical analysis, positioning “the...

Review by Frances Steel


Review

Commerce by a Frozen Sea: Native Americans and the European Fur Trade

This may be the most important book on the history of the fur trade in the Hudson’s Bay Company Territories published in a generation. Although its purview does not include British Columbia, all historians of...

Review by Theodore Binnema


Review

The Literary Storefront: The Glory Years: Vancouver’s Literary Centre 1978-1985

Few bookstores figure prominently in modern literary history. Shakespeare and Company in Paris, once frequented by Joyce, Stein, Fitzgerald, and Hemingway, and City Lights in San Francisco, made famous by Ginsberg and Kerouac, are shrines...

Review by Nicholas Bradley


Review

Points of Entry: How Canada’s Immigration Officers Decide Who Gets In

Though less controversial than in many other countries, admission of immigrants and refugees to Canada not infrequently raises protests of “too many” or “too few” from partisan commentators, and sensationalised media accounts of particular entry...

Review by David Ley