We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (220)

Book Review

From New Peoples to New Nations: Aspects of Metis History and Identity from the Eighteenth to the Twenty-first Centuries

Gerhard Ens and Joe Sawchuck’s co-written volume From New Peoples to New Nations approaches historical and contemporary Métis identity from a perspective that is uncommon and even contested among Indigenous histories. From a social constructionist...

Review by Gabrielle Legault


Book Review

A Nation in Conflict: Canada and the Two World Wars

In the practice of military history, historians have tended to examine conflicts independently of each other, separating them out from other conflicts and from broader social currents and non-military events. Conflicts are often treated individually,...

Review by Jonathan Weier


Book Review

Climber’s Paradise: Making Canada’s Mountain Parks, 1906-1974

Two powerful and iconic institutions can be found at the centre of most histories of tourism and recreation in the mountains of western Canada: the Canadian Pacific Railway and the agency known today as Parks...

Review by Ben Bradley


Book Review

When Good Drugs Go Bad: Opium, Medicine, and the Origins of Canada’s Drug Laws

This is a story of contested authority. Dan Malleck has drawn from legal, medical, newspaper, policy, and pharmacy perspectives to explore the shifting conceptualizations of opium addiction and regulation in nineteenth century Canada. In some...

Review by Erika Dyck


Book Review

Common Bonds: A History of Greater Vancouver Community Credit Union

The credit union movement in British Columbia is, in a way, a legacy of the Great Depression. When banks and governments were unwilling or unable to respond appropriately to economic crisis, mutual aid arrangements became...

Review by Lani Russwurm


Book Review

Innocence on Trial: The Framing of Ivan Henry

When Ivan Henry’s wife Jessie contacted Vancouver Police Department (VPD) detectives in 1982, she initiated a series of events that would see her husband spend the next twenty-seven years in prison for crimes he maintained...

Review by Bonnie Reilly Schmidt


Book Review

Cold Case Vancouver: The City’s Most Baffling Unsolved Murders

Eve Lazarus’s fascination with Vancouver’s history continues with her latest book, Cold Case Vancouver: The City’s Most Baffling Unsolved Murders. Crime buffs and readers interested in true crime literature or in understanding how police investigate...

Review by Bonnie Reilly Schmidt


Book Review

Three Athapaskan Ethnographies: Diamond Jenness on the Sekani, Tsuu T’ina and Wet’suwet’en, 1921-1924

Diamond Jenness was a diligent and talented ethnographer, and the years 1921-1924 were particularly productive. In the summer of 1921 he visited the Sarcee (Suuu T’ina) of Alberta and wrote a report based on “field-notes...

Review by Robin Ridington


Book Review

Truth & Indignation: Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Indian Residential Schools

The struggle to articulate Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) has seen varying degrees of success since the Commission was established in the 2006 Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement. In 2008, the Aboriginal Healing Foundation...

Review by David Gaertner


Book Review

Vancouver Blue: A Life Against Crime

Wayne Cope joined the Vancouver Police Department (VPD) in 1975, the fulfillment of a childhood dream to be a police officer. Like most police memoirs, Cope’s is filled with anecdotal stories, some humorous and some...

Review by Bonnie Reilly Schmidt


Book Review

The Gold Will Speak For Itself: Peter Leech and Leechtown

Vancouver Island has a distinctive personality among the regions of British Columbia, one that has been shaped in complex ways by geography and history. The books reviewed here vary in their candlepower, but all of...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Book Review

The Bastard of Fort Stikine: The Hudson’s Bay Company and the Murder of John McLoughlin, Jr.

  During his round-the-world voyage in 1842, Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) Governor George Simpson arrived at Fort Stikine and discovered that chief trader John McLoughlin Jr. had been killed. Two recent books discuss this event....

Review by Corey Larson


Book Review

From Classroom to Battlefield: Victoria High School and the First World War

In his portrait of Victoria High School (VHS), Barry Gough has created a vivid microcosm of the First World War’s impact on Canadians. As one of Canada’s foremost historians, Gough brings a special authenticity to...

Review by James Wood


Book Review

Wood Storms/Wild Canvas: The Art of Godfrey Stephens

In the introduction that the art critic Robert Amos has contributed to this pictorial biography, he tells us that Duncan-born Godfrey Stephens is “too busy and too self-centred, to study the influences of art history...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

A Missing Genocide and the Demonization of its Heroes

Tom Swanky’s self-published book A Missing Genocide and the Demonization of its Heroes brings into sharp focus the problems faced by historians steeped in a discipline that does not fully appreciate the culturally constructed limitations...

Review by Chris Arnett


Book Review

Walhachin: Birth of a Legend

Walhachin has a particular resonance for many British Columbians. Because of this, certain aspects of the Walhachin story have acquired a permanency and legitimacy that are not supported by what actually happened at this Edwardian orchard...

Review by Dennis Oomen


Book Review

Rebel Youth: 1960s Labour Unrest, Young Workers, and New Leftists in English Canada

With Rebel Youth, Ian Milligan hearkens back to the political youth movements that went to the barricades, the conferences, and the picket lines in the 1960s, and in the process historicizes the events and people...

Review by Ron Verzuh


Book Review

Surveying Southern British Columbia: A Photojournal of Frank Swannell, 1901-07

When the Vancouver convention centre was completed in 2009, a series of interpretive panels describing the history of British Columbia were placed along the waterfront promenade. Featured among these panels is the story of “BC’s...

Review by Kelly Black