We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (45)

Book Review

Against the Current and Into the Light: Performing History and Land in Coast Salish Territories and Vancouver’s Stanley Park

Coast Salish Indigenous people never ceded their lands and resources to settlers and have always asserted their sovereignty. Over time, those assertions have taken various forms: petitions, protests, litigation. There have also been cultural assertions...

Review by Sean Kheraj


Book Review

Rain City: Vancouver Reflections

John Moore is a BC-based free-lance journalist and author. Original versions of the sixteen essays that make up this volume have appeared in a variety of newspapers and periodicals over several decades. Some have won...

Review by John Belec


Book Review

Time Travel: Tourism and the Rise of the Living History Museum in Mid-Twentieth-Century Canada

We all remember them. I know that I do. Having spent a summer in my youth washing dishes at Fort Steele heritage town, I remember the wooden boardwalks, the ramshackle buildings, the yellow school buses...

Review by Sean MacPherson


Book Review

Vistas: Artists on the Canadian Pacific Railway

Vistas, Artists on the Canadian Pacific Railway is about the ways in which painters and photographs met the challenge of capturing the mountain landscape west of Calgary during the late nineteenth century. This book is...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

Creative Margins: Cultural Production in Canadian Suburbs

Alison Bain, an associate professor of geography at York University, begins Creative Margins with David Gordon and Mark Janzen’s assertion that “Canada is a suburban nation (3),” noting that our population, like that of the...

Review by Ginny Ratsoy


Book Review

Canadian Pacific: The Golden Age of Travel

The Canadian Pacific Railway’s travel literature boasts marvellous scenery, adventure, and extravagance. “You shall see mighty rivers, vast forest, boundless plains, stupendous mountains and wonders innumerable, and you shall see in all in comfort, nay...

Review by Heather Longworth Sjoblom


Book Review

Spirits of the Rockies: Reasserting an Indigenous Presence in Banff National Park

The history of Indigenous peoples and parks — notably their exclusion from such places — is a field of study that has blossomed over the past two decades. Courtney Mason’s Spirits of the Rockies: Reasserting...

Review by Jonathan Clapperton


Book Review

Climber’s Paradise: Making Canada’s Mountain Parks, 1906-1974

Two powerful and iconic institutions can be found at the centre of most histories of tourism and recreation in the mountains of western Canada: the Canadian Pacific Railway and the agency known today as Parks...

Review by Ben Bradley


Book Review

Okanagan Geology South: Geologic Highlights of the South Okanagan, British Columbia

Guidebooks present risks. Some authors inadvertently lead readers into the minutia that is their passion. Others find themselves indulging in editorial or polemic. Yet others lose their readers in what might be described as a...

Review by Wayne Wilson


Book Review

Inventing Stanley Park: An Environmental History

Vancouver’s famous park has received a lot of attention, including from notable historians like Jean Barman and Robert A. J. McDonald, prominent artists like Emily Carr, and a continuous collection of journalists and tourism writers...

Review by Philip Van Huizen


Book Review

Finding Jim

Finding Jim is an intimate portrayal of grief. In this memoir, first-time author Susan Oakey-Baker chronicles her relationship with mountain guide Jim Haberl (1958-99), a Canadian climber made famous for his 1993 ascent of K2...

Review by Zac Robinson


Book Review

Mystery Islands: Discovering the Ancient Pacific

Drawing on experience gained from travel writing assignments, Salt Spring author Tom Koppel tackles an ambitious subject, the peopling of the Pacific Ocean, with a book of interesting anecdotes and information set within a larger,...

Review by Chris Arnett


Book Review

Long Beach Wild: A Celebration of People and Place on Canada’s Rugged Western Shore

Long Beach Wild is the kind of book that academics are often quick to dismiss. It’s popular history, after all (academics, of course, preferring unpopular histories), by a freelance writer whose many previous works include...

Review by Philip Van Huizen


Book Review

Selling Canada: Three Propaganda Campaigns that Shaped the Nation

In his latest project Daniel Francis takes on a series of publicity campaigns, running from the 1870s through to 1940: immigration to western Canada, the First World War, and the promotion of tourism from the...

Review by Doug Owram


Book Review

Manufacturing National Park Nature: Photography, Ecology, and the Wilderness Industry of Jasper

Contributing to the emerging and vibrant field of national park histories in Canada, J. Keri Cronin’s Manufacturing National Park Nature: Photography, Ecology, and the Wilderness Industry of Jasper explores how photographs created for tourist consumption...

Review by Jenny Clayton


Book Review

Geography of British Columbia: People and Landscapes in Transition 3rd Edition

I was intrigued by this textbook and agreed to review it for two reasons: first, because it is more than fifteen years since I lived in British Columbia and I was keen to discover how...

Review by Daniel Clayton


Book Review

Campbell River: Gateway to the Inside Passage, Including Strathcona, the Discovery Islands and the Mainland Inlets

Campbell River, Gateway to the Inside Passage offers a fresh look at the Campbell River area, mainly seen through the lens of Boomer Jerritt, whose striking images comprise a large portion of the book. The...

Review by Catherine Gilbert