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Book & Film Reviews

book film review

The Principle of Tsawalk: An Indigenous Approach to Global Crisis

Do the theories and worldviews of the Enlightenment unfold all there is to know about reality? Can the political relationships between Canadians and Indigenous peoples be mended solely through Eurocentric remedies? Can settler Canadians and...

By Damien Lee


book film review

The Imaginary Indian: The Image of the Indian in Canadian Culture (2nd Edition)

Twenty years after its initial publication, The Imaginary Indian: The Image of the Indian in Canadian Culture remains a relevant read. Featuring a new preface and afterword, this second edition of Daniel Francis’s important popular...

By Chelsea Horton


book film review

Westward Bound: Sex, Violence, the Law, and the Making of a Settler Society

Westward Bound is a work of remarkable scope and depth. Covering the period from 1886 to 1940, Lesley Erickson uses records from local courts, the Department of Indian Affairs, and the North West Mounted Police...

By Chris Herbert


book film review

Oral History on Trial: Recognizing Aboriginal Narratives in the Courts

Telling It To The Judge and Oral History On Trial tackle the problematic reception by Canadian courts of ethno-history and oral history presented by First Nations and their experts. However, Arthur Ray and Bruce Miller...

By Bruce Granville Miller


book film review

Murder in the Chilcotin

Author Roy Innes can be forgiven for his less than stellar accuracy in depicting the Cariboo Chilcotin in his recent crime novel, Murder in the Chilcotin. His story-telling prowess, captivating story line, and intriguing plot...

By Sage Birchwater


book film review

The Nature of Borders: Salmon, Boundaries, and Bandits on the Salish Sea

Lissa Wadewitz’s The Nature of Borders offers valuable insights into the shifting nature of boundaries on the Salish Sea and their significance for the Pacific salmon swimming through it. These fish traverse the sea on...

By Howard Stewart


book film review

The Pathfinder: A.C. Anderson’s Journeys in the West

Alexander Caulfield Anderson was born to British parents on a plantation in India in 1814, raised and schooled in England, and in 1831 arrived in Lachine, Lower Canada, where he was promptly hired on as...

By Ken Brealey


book film review

Selling Canada: Three Propaganda Campaigns that Shaped the Nation

In his latest project Daniel Francis takes on a series of publicity campaigns, running from the 1870s through to 1940: immigration to western Canada, the First World War, and the promotion of tourism from the...

By Doug Owram


book film review

A Sisterhood of Suffering and Service: Women and Girls of Canada and Newfoundland During the First World War

When it comes to the history of women in wartime Canada, the Second World War has so far attracted the most attention from scholars. Perhaps surprisingly, given the otherwise-abundant scholarship on Canada’s Great War, those...

By Lisa Pasolli


book film review

Canada’s Road to the Pacific War: Intelligence, Strategy, and the Far East Crisis

Canada’s Road to the Pacific War examines the role of intelligence in Canadian strategic planning during the year preceding the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Drawing on archival resources in Canada, Britain, and the United...

By James Wood


book film review

Raincoast Chronicles 21: West Coast Wrecks and Other Maritime Tales

Tales of shipwrecks along British Columbia’s coast have focused on adventure and tragedy since the fur trade era. With marine transportation occupying such an important role in our daily lives, it is remarkable that so...

By David Hill-Turner


book film review

The Uchuck Years: A West Coast Shipping Saga

The Uchuck Years is the tale of how two partners managed to keep a passenger and freight service afloat on Vancouver Island’s West Coast and pass the company on to the next generation. David Esson...

By Kenneth Campbell


book film review

Passing Through Missing Pages: The Intriguing Story of Annie Garland Foster

In the early 1990s, author Frances Welwood agreed to research the life of Annie Garland Foster for a Nelson Museum exhibition, “The Women of Nelson, 1880-1950.” An early woman graduate of the University of New...

By Duff Sutherland


book film review

Yip Sang and the First Chinese Canadians

Francis Hern’s Yip Sang and the First Chinese Canadians is the biography of a prominent merchant in Vancouver’s Chinatown in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The story begins with Yip Sang’s arrival in...

By LiLynn Wan


book film review

Dim Sum Stories: A Chinatown Childhood

Vancouver’s Chinatown has been the subject of numerous notable academic studies, providing a focus that has proven to be essential to the Canadian historical narrative. In analyzing the history of Vancouver’s Chinatown, scholars have made...

By LiLynn Wan


book film review

A Hard Man to Beat: The Story of Bill White, Labour Leader, Historian, Shipyard Worker, Raconteur

Selected as one of ten Vancouver books reprinted to celebrate the city’s 125th anniversary, A Hard Man to Beat is perhaps even more important now than when it was first published. Then, Bill White’s lively...

By Mark Leier


book film review

The Education of an Innocent: An Autobiography by E.R. “Ernie” Forbes

Why should BC Studies review the autobiography of E.R. “Ernie” Forbes, a leading historian of Maritime Canada? The answer is that several years in Victoria helped him to confirm his ideas about the importance of...

By Patricia Roy


book film review

Mulligan’s Stew: My Life … So Far

Searching the Canadian literary pantry for a satisfying meal of rock and roll history can turn up very slim pickings indeed. Which is why British Columbia veteran DJ, VJ, and actor Terry David Mulligan’s memoir...

By Vanessa Colantonio


book film review

All Roads Lead to Wells: Stories of the Hippie Days

The growing literature about hippies demonstrates that the phenomenon was anything but uniform. Joy Inglis, in a privately printed book, describes one manifestation: a commune on Quadra Island that was established in 1968 by Antioch...

By David Stouck


book film review

Stranger on a Strange Island: From Main Street to Mayne Island

Grant Buday’s slim tome about his transition to life on Mayne Island in the new millennium is my favourite among the small pile of good books about life on the inland sea that I’ve reviewed...

By Howard Stewart


book film review

Front Lines: Portraits of Caregivers in Northern British Columbia

“I always seem to get inspiration and renewed vitality by contact with this great novel land of yours….”[1] So said Prime Minister Winston Churchill to Vice President Richard Nixon, in June 1954, at a British...

By Pamela Ratner


book film review

City Critters: Wildlife in the Urban Jungle

This beautifully illustrated volume introduces readers young and old to the diversity of wild animals that share urban environments with us. Through entertaining anecdotes and compelling and often humorous narrative, Nicholas Read explains where these...

By Jennifer Bonnell


book film review

Nowhere Else on Earth: Standing Tall for the Great Bear Rainforest

The Great Bear Rainforest, also known as the North and Central Coast of British Columbia, is one of the last intact temperate rainforests left in the world. This region has received much attention since 1989,...

By Margaret (Maggie) Low


book film review

Manufacturing National Park Nature: Photography, Ecology, and the Wilderness Industry of Jasper

Contributing to the emerging and vibrant field of national park histories in Canada, J. Keri Cronin’s Manufacturing National Park Nature: Photography, Ecology, and the Wilderness Industry of Jasper explores how photographs created for tourist consumption...

By Jenny Clayton


book film review

Making Meaning out of Mountains: the Political Ecology of Skiing

Mountains play important and complex roles in the lives of British Columbians. As sources of material wealth, barriers to travel and communication, and sites of physical and spiritual exertion and exploration, mountain landscapes have shaped...

By David Rossiter


Contributors

Contributors

Jean Barman’s ten books and numerous edited volumes, articles, and book chapters on British Columbia history have won a dozen Canadian and American awards. Her prize-winning The West beyond the West: A History of British Columbia is in its third edition. She is professor emeritus at the University of British Columbia, a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and recipient of a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal.

Malcolm G. Bird is an assistant professor of Politics at the University of Winnipeg who is fascinated by the evolution of Canada’s Crown corporations.

Deidre Cullon is currently a PhD student in the anthropology department at the University of Victoria. She has worked with First Nations in British Columbia for more than 15 years and lives on Vancouver Island.

Shelly Ikebuchi completed her PhD in sociology at the University of British Columbia. Her research interests include the historical intersections of gender, race, and nation in British Columbia. She teaches in the Department of Sociology at Okanagan College in Kelowna, British Columbia, where she is also the current Chair.

Bradley P. Tolppanen is a librarian at Booth Library, Eastern Illinois University. His publications focus on library services and bibliography.

Ron Verzuh is a writer and historian currently completing his doctoral dissertation in history at Simon Fraser University. His topic: the labour and social relations that engulfed Trail, British Columbia, from 1935 to 1955. He is a retired national communications director for the Canadian Union of Public Employees and author of three books, several monographs, and numerous articles. He was a member of Mine-Mill Local 480 when it merged with the Steel Workers in 1967. His article on Paul Robeson’s 1950s Peace Arch concerts appeared in BC Studies 174 (2012)
Jean Barman’s ten books and numerous edited volumes, articles, and book chapters on British Columbia history have won a dozen Canadian and American awards. Her prize-winning The West beyond the West: A History of British Columbia is in its third edition. She is professor emeritus at the University of British Columbia, a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and recipient of a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal.

Malcolm G. Bird is an assistant professor of Politics at the University of Winnipeg who is fascinated by the evolution of Canada’s Crown corporations.

Deidre Cullon is currently a PhD student in the anthropology department at the University of Victoria. She has worked with First Nations in British Columbia for more than 15 years and lives on Vancouver Island.

Shelly Ikebuchi completed her PhD in sociology at the University of British Columbia. Her research interests include the historical intersections of gender, race, and nation in British Columbia. She teaches in the Department of Sociology at Okanagan College in Kelowna, British Columbia, where she is also the current Chair.

Bradley P. Tolppanen is a librarian at Booth Library, Eastern Illinois University. His publications focus on library services and bibliography.

Ron Verzuh is a writer and historian currently completing his doctoral dissertation in history at Simon Fraser University. His topic: the labour and social relations that engulfed Trail, British Columbia, from 1935 to 1955. He is a retired national communications director for the Canadian Union of Public Employees and author of three books, several monographs, and numerous articles. He was a member of Mine-Mill Local 480 when it merged with the Steel Workers in 1967. His article on Paul Robeson’s 1950s Peace Arch concerts appeared in BC Studies 174 (2012)