We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Single Issue

BC Studies no. 181 Spring 2014

Our Spring 2014 issue features a Photo Essay on Victoria’s Uplands by Larry McCann as well as articles by Jordan Stanger-Ross, Lynne Marks, Jennifer Silver, and Christopher Herbert.

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Articles

Photo Essays

photo essay

Book & Film Reviews

book film review

Memories of Jack Pickup: Flying Doctor of British Columbia

       Transportation and communication technologies have played an integral role in modernizing British Columbia by reconfiguring possibilities of movement and exchange. As Cole Harris has pointed out in The Resettlement of British Columbia (1997), the...

By Bret Edwards


book film review

Back to the Land: Ceramics from Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands, 1970-1985

Earning a decent living from pottery is difficult. Crafts, in general, do not support high earners. The notion that any amateur can throw a pot has kept professional potters just above the poverty line —...

By Maria Tippett


book film review

Life in the Tee-Pee

In the spring of 1956, the proprietors of the roadside Tee-Pee Restaurant near Boston Bar were unceremoniously informed that their business and odd assortment of buildings would be expropriated and destroyed to make way for...

By Ian Mosby


book film review

The Fisher Queen: A Deckhand’s Tales of the BC Coast

Promoting an upcoming reading of Don Pepper’s A Life on the Water at the Vancouver Maritime Museum, Harbour Publishing exclaims: “Here, finally, is a book about commercial salmon fishing through the eyes of a commercial...

By Molly Clarkson


book film review

Social Transformation in Rural Canada Community, Cultures, and Collective Action

  Over the course of the twentieth century, massive social, economic, cultural, and political transformations occurred in Canada, almost all of which benefitted rapidly growing urban areas. As urban areas grew more and more dominant,...

By Chris Herbert


book film review

Sensational Victoria: Bright Lights, Red Lights, Murders, Ghosts & Gardens

Eve Lazarus is a Vancouver-based freelance writer and self-confessed obsessive blogger about houses and their genealogies. Her passion for history, the arts, old houses, and her community has resulted in three previous books: At Home...

By John Adams


book film review

Imperial Vancouver Island: Who was Who 1850-1950

The author of this work, Professor J.F. Bosher, was born in North Saanich near Sidney, British Columbia and raised in a cultured English family. Having retired from York University in Toronto, where he specialized in...

By Patrick Dunae


book film review

Dispatches From The Occupation: A History of Change

On 25 September 2011, the first “occupiers” began to move into Zuccotti Park. Located near the heart of Wall Street, New York’s financial district, their presence was initially ignored by mainstream media. However, awareness grew...

By Robin Folvik


book film review

Behind the Steam: The Inside Story of the Gastown Steam Clock

With a seemingly permanent cluster of tourists snapping its photo, the Gastown steam clock is undoubtedly one of the most popular tourist attractions in Vancouver. Despite its misleading Edwardian appearance (it was built in the...

By Lani Russwurm


book film review

Debating Dissent: Canada and the Sixties

Generation has dominated sixties scholarship since the baby-boomers came of age in the 1960s. Early historical scholarship, often written by those who participated in the events, emphasized a rupture with the past. These writers focused...

By Nancy Janovicek


book film review

K’esu’: The Art and Life of Doug Cranmer

Jennifer Kramer’s book K’esu’: The Art and Life of Doug Cranmer was written to accompany the Museum of Anthropology’s 2012 landmark retrospective exhibit about the life and work of the internationally renowned Kwakwaka’wakw artist Doug...

By Carolyn Butler Palmer


book film review

The Canadian Pacific’s Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway: The CPR steam years, 1905-1949

While the roundhouses are now mostly silent and only the occasional freight train makes its way up and down the island, the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway (E&N) occupies a prominent place in Vancouver Island’s history....

By David Hill-Turner


book film review

Perfect Youth: The Birth of Canadian Punk

As the angry, impetuous, and disobedient stepchild of rock-and-roll, punk has become an increasingly popular topic for academic and popular writers. Yet, as Sam Sutherland’s Perfect Youth demonstrates, Canadian contributions have often gone unnoticed. In...

By Eryk Martin


book film review

Above the Bush: A Century of Climbing on Vancouver Island, 1912-2012

In 1968, Mike Walsh did a solo ascent of Vancouver Island’s second highest peak, Mount Colonel Foster in Strathcona Park, “without rope or pitons,” an approach he did not recommend to others (67). Reporting on...

By Jenny Clayton


book film review

Canadian Liberalism and the Politics of Border Control, 1867-1967

Always among the more contentious of Canadian public policies, the control of immigration, legal and illegal, is once again on the front burner. Political scientist Christopher Anderson sets himself the task of explaining the broad...

By Reg Whitaker


book film review

Alpine Anatomy: The Mountain Art of Arnold Shives

Alpine Anatomy: The Mountain Art of Arnold Shives celebrates the North Vancouver printmaker and painter’s representations of British Columbia’s sublime mountainous landscape. The book offers an overview of Shives’ career and includes five essays by...

By Devon Smither


book film review

Ian Wallace: At the Intersection of Painting and Photography

This is the fifth catalogue published in conjunction with a solo art exhibition by Ian Wallace since 2007. It is also the largest and most handsomely designed of the group, the collaborative product of an...

By John O'Brian


book film review

Father August Brabant: Saviour or Scourge?

The numerous European men and fewer women who travelled overseas to spread a particular brand of Christianity among distant peoples in the nineteenth century are a perennial source of interest among scholars — and for...

By Nicholas May


book film review

Subverting Exclusion: Transpacific Encounters with Race, Caste, and Borders, 1885-1928

In 1871 in the process of dismantling the mibun or caste system that had been the basis of Japanese politics and society for hundreds of years, the fledgling Meiji government emancipated the buraku jūmin, or...

By Joel Legassie


book film review

Carrying on Irregardless: Humour In Contemporary Northwest Coast Art

An exhibition and catalogue devoted to humour in contemporary Northwest Coast art was long overdue. Martine Reid’s and Peter Morin’s Carrying on Irregardless: Humour In Contemporary Northwest Coast Art positions itself as the Northwest Coast...

By Judy Jansen


book film review

Ever-Changing Sky: Doris Lee’s Journey from Schoolteacher to Cariboo Rancher

Doris Lee’s memoir, Ever-Changing Sky, offers readers an account of the nearly twenty years she and her husband spent as owner/operators of Big Lake Ranch, deep in the heart of British Columbia’s Cariboo country. Freshly...

By Megan Prins


book film review

Journeywoman: Swinging a Hammer in a Man’s World

Strong women grace the covers of both of these memoirs of pioneering women who made unconventional choices in the 1970s. Four women flex their muscles in the cover image of Gumboot Girls, proudly displaying the...

By Nancy Janovicek


book film review

Sidetracked: The Struggle for BC’s Fossils

This book explores the relationship between professional paleontologists and amateur fossil collectors in the context of several important paleontological sites in British Columbia. It focuses on the friction that can develop between enthusiastic amateur collectors...

By Godfrey Nowlan


book film review

The Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway: The Dunsmuir Years: 1884-1905

Originally, Robert Dunsmuir, the founder of the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway (E&N), had intended the southern terminus to be Esquimalt and the northern terminus to be Nanaimo, as the name suggests, but before he had...

By Bruce Hodding


Contributors

Contributors

Christopher Herbert is an Assistant Professor of History at Columbia Basin College in Pasco, Washington. His recent publications include a chapter in the forthcoming Conspiracy Theories in the United States and the Middle East: A Comparative Approach from De Gruyter Press and “‘Life’s Prizes Are by Labor Got’: Risk, Reward, and White Manliness in the California Gold Rush” in the Pacific Historical Review.

Lynne Marks teaches Canadian history at the Department of History at the University of Victoria. She is the author of Revivals and Roller Rinks: Religion, Leisure and Identity in Late Nineteenth Century Small Town Ontario, has published a range of articles on gender and the social history of religion, and is completing a manuscript for UBC Press on religion and irreligion in late nineteenth and early twentieth century British Columbia.

Larry McCann, a long-time student of Canadian suburbanization and a dedicated teacher, is a Professor Emeritus of Geography at the University of Victoria. His work in both spheres has been recognized by an Outstanding Achievement Award of the Heritage Society of BC, an award of merit from the Hallmark Society of Victoria, an award for teaching excellence from the University of Victoria, and the Massey Medal of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society.

Jennifer Silver is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Guelph. Currently, she is leading or collaborating on projects that explore the dynamics and governance possibilities for contested ocean spaces and marine resources in British Columbia, international oceans governance and oceans negotiations at Rio+20, and the cultural politics of “the sustainable seafood movement.” Across these, she seeks to explain the influence of power and politics in decision-making and, where possible, to v relate this to social-ecological outcomes. She grew up in coastal Nova Scotia and has had the good fortune to work in coastal communities in British Columbia and the Turks and Caicos Islands.

Jordan Stanger-Ross is Associate Professor of History at the University of Victoria. His research and writing focus on the history of immigration, race, and inequality in twentieth century North America. This article is part of his larger ongoing project on the dispossession of Japanese Canadians, tentatively entitled “Suspect Properties.”