We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (79)

Book Review

From the Forest to the Sea: Emily Carr in British Columbia

Over sixty years after her death, Emily Carr has hit the international scene. It began in June 2012 when seven of her paintings were featured in Kassell, Germany’s prestigious Documenta, an art fair that showcases...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

From Classroom to Battlefield: Victoria High School and the First World War

In his portrait of Victoria High School (VHS), Barry Gough has created a vivid microcosm of the First World War’s impact on Canadians. As one of Canada’s foremost historians, Gough brings a special authenticity to...

Review by James Wood


Book Review

Welcome to Resisterville: American Dissidents in British Columbia

Just about every kid who grew up in British Columbia in the 1980s had a friend (or a friend of a friend) whose parents were American immigrants. Their parents usually arrived in the province sometime...

Review by Sean Kheraj


Book Review

Salmonbellies vs. The World: The Story of the Most Famous Team in Lacrosse & Their Greatest Rivals

In this well-researched, beautifully illustrated book W.B. MacDonald tells the story of the Salmonbellies from their founding to the present, and he does much more. He traces the evolution of lacrosse in the province, beginning...

Review by Eric Sager


Book Review

Encounters in Avalanche Country: A History of Survival in the Mountain West, 1820-1920

Winter in the western mountains of Canada and the United States is a challenging time of year. Encounters in Avalanche Country provides insight into the experiences of trappers, miners, railway employees, and their communities in...

Review by Heather Longworth


Book Review

Death or Deliverance: Canadian Courts Martial in the Great War

In the summer of 1919, newspapers in several communities in British Columbia printed special victory editions with honour rolls of soldiers and airmen who died or returned wounded from serving on the Western Front during...

Review by Chris Madsen


Book Review

The Ones Who Have to Pay: The Soldiers-Poets of Victoria BC in the Great War 1914-1918

Robert Ratcliffe Taylor’s study of the soldier-poets of the First World War is useful for scholarship and is approachable by a casual reader. Although the tone of this review must be critical, the utility and...

Review by James Gifford


Book Review

The Canadian Rangers: A Living History

Today the Canadian Rangers are noted as a unique unit within the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), created to establish a military presence in remote coastal and northern regions by utilizing mainly Aboriginal volunteers. Lackenbauer’s extensive...

Review by James Wood


Book Review

Harold Mortimer-Lamb: The Art Lover

Harold Mortimer-Lamb lived an extraordinary life — all ninety-nine years of it. Born in England in 1872, he came to British Columbia at the age of seventeen, initially to work on Captain L.N. Agassiz’s Fraser...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

Labour Goes to War: The CIO and the Construction of a New Social Order, 1939-45

Labour Goes to War is a welcome new study whose title promises readers an analysis of the major industrial union organizing drive led by the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) during the Second World War....

Review by Ron Verzuh


Book Review

The Amazing Foot Race of 1921: Halifax to Vancouver in 134 Days

Three teams left Halifax in a 3,645-mile pedestrian race to Vancouver in 1921. Amateur sportsman Charles Burkman was first to head west on 17 January, followed a few days later by Jack and Clifford Behan,...

Review by PearlAnn Reichwein


Book Review

InJustice Served: The Story of British Columbia’s Italian Enemy Aliens During World War II

Historical redress is a touchy subject and should be handled with care. At root, it is a question about what to address. InJustice Served is funded by the vaguely termed “Community Historical Recognition Program” (CHRP),...

Review by Stephen Fielding


Book Review

Seeing Red: A History of Natives in Canadian Newspapers

Seeing Red is a tough read. It’s tough because the sheer amount of data gathered from Canadian newspapers ends up, at times, reading like endless lists of information, rather than a coherent narrative, argument, or...

Review by Hadley Friedland


Book Review

Gateway to Promise: Canada’s First Japanese Community

  The authors, Ann-Lee Switzer and Gordon Switzer are both historians and writers with an interest in the Japanese Canadian experience. Gateway to Promise: Canada’s First Japanese Community is a rich history of the Japanese...

Review by Masako Fukawa, Stanley Fukawa


Book Review

Who Killed Janet Smith?

In late July 1924 in a house in the upper crust neighbourhood of Shaughnessy Heights, Vancouver, around midday, a Scots nursemaid was found dead in the basement by the Chinese “house boy,” Wing Fong Sing....

Review by John McLaren