We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (13)

Review

Salmon Canneries: British Columbia North Coast

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 96, Winter 1992  

Review by Alicja Muszynski


Review

The Good Hope Cannery: Life and Death at a Salmon Cannery

Until post-war technology allowed for the centralization of salmon canning, the industry relied on numerous canneries located close to the fishing grounds. More than 200 canneries were scattered along the BC coast, and apart from...

Review by Kenneth Campbell


Review

Watara- Dori (Birds of Passage)

WATARA-DORI (Birds of Passage) is a biographical fiction of a half-year period (24 June 1915 to 1 January 1916) in the life of a Japanese-Canadian fisher. Mitsuo Yesaki has a thorough knowledge of the Pacific coast fisheries,...

Review by Michiko Ayukawa


Review

Nikkei Fishermen on the BC Coast: Their Biographies and Photographs

The term “Nikkei” has become prevalent in the last decade or two. Its broad definition is “people of Japanese descent and their descendants,” and includes those of mixed heritage. It assumes they have an interest...

Review by Michiko Ayukawa


Review

Legacy in Wood: The Wahl Family Boat Builders

For almost half a century, the Wahl family boatyard near Prince Rupert produced high-quality wooden boats for the coastal fishing fleet. Founded by Norwegian immigrant Ed Wahl after the First World War, the boatyard built...

Review by Forrest Pass


Review

High Boats: A Century of Salmon Remembered

The commercial salmon fishery has recently inspired a spate of books on the fading of the salmon industry. This volume fits into that literature. Among its special virtues are its basis in a specific area...

Review by Keith Ralston


Review

Sutebusuton: A Japanese Village on the British Columbia Coast

MITSUO YESAKI was born in Steveston, known to its early Japanese-Canadian residents as Sutebusuton. He spent his early childhood there until the expulsion of Japanese Canadians from the West Coast in 1942. He is a...

Review by Ann Dore


Review

Making Wawa: The Genesis of Chinook Jargon

It is difficult to research and write about the history of British Columbia without coming across snippets of Chinook Jargon. Within living memory, it was the lingua franca in coastal logging camps and salmon canneries,...

Review by Forrest Pass


Review

Sakura in the Land of the Maple Leaf: Japanese Cultural Traditions in Canada

This book, edited by the curator of Asian studies at the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Gatineau, Quebec, is a worthy publication. It is a compilation of three research projects conducted in 1976-77 for the...

Review by Michiko Ayukawa


Review

The Sea Among Us: The Amazing Strait of Georgia

Much of my critique of Beamish and McFarlane’s The Sea Among Us is that familiar reviewer’s refrain: they didn’t write the book that I would have. With the luxury of a dozen different writers, I...

Review by Howard Stewart


Review

The W̲SÁNEĆ and Their Neighbours: Diamond Jenness on the Coast Salish of Vancouver Island, 1935

Anthropologist Rolf Knight launched a new chapter of Indigenous history in 1978 with the publication of his book, Indians at Work: An Informal History of Native Indian Labour in British Columbia, 1858-1930.[1]  In contrast to...

Review by Wendy Wickwire


Review

Resilience, Reciprocity and Ecological Economics: Northwest Coast Sustainability

In this brief and densely-packed treatise on why and how the aboriginal economy of the Northwest Coast worked so well, Ronald Trosper dives into the science fiction/fantasy territory: he re-imagines the clash of two competing...

Review by Jude Isabella


Review

The Nature of Borders: Salmon, Boundaries, and Bandits on the Salish Sea

Lissa Wadewitz’s The Nature of Borders offers valuable insights into the shifting nature of boundaries on the Salish Sea and their significance for the Pacific salmon swimming through it. These fish traverse the sea on...

Review by Howard Stewart