We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

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Book & Film Reviews

book film review

Breaking Ground: The Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe and the Unearthing of Tze-whit-zen Village

Breaking Ground, by journalist Lynda Mapes, is a compelling, well told story of a Coast Salish tribe in Washington State – the Lower Elwha – and its fraught relations with the settler community that grew...

By Bruce Miller


book film review

Cascadia: The Elusive Utopia – Exploring the Spirit of the Pacific Northwest

Fourteen individually authored chapters (and several supplements) reflect on a shared and bifurcated bioregion and, in the process, assemble the varied ways in which the designation “Cascadia” has been applied. Among the surprises in the...

By Laurie Ricou


book film review

Tragedy at Second Narrows: The Story of the Ironworkers Memorial Bridge

Probably few occupants of the 120,000 vehicles that daily take the Ironworkers Memorial Second Narrows Crossing know its full name or the story behind it. Of those who do, a significant portion still resents the...

By Mark Leier


book film review

Becoming British Columbia: A Population History

If Canada, as William Lyon Mackenzie King once quipped, has too much geography, John Belshaw might well reply that Canadian historiography has too little demography. Regional historical writing, including that found in British Columbia, has...

By Forrest Pass


book film review

Reasoning Otherwise: Leftists and the People’s Enlightenment in Canada, 1890-1920

It took a mountain of labour to write this book, but the result is a molehill of meaningful history. This is the second volume of Ian McKay’s planned multi-volume history of the left in Canada,...

By Gary Teeple


book film review

Now It’s Called Princeton: Songs and Poems of BC’s Upper Similkameen

Both of these works step outside of conventional history, and to very good effect. One is a novel in which the principal characters participate in that mid-nineteenth-century mass movement, the BC gold rush. The other...

By John Belshaw


book film review

Legacy in Wood: The Wahl Family Boat Builders

For almost half a century, the Wahl family boatyard near Prince Rupert produced high-quality wooden boats for the coastal fishing fleet. Founded by Norwegian immigrant Ed Wahl after the First World War, the boatyard built...

By Forrest Pass


book film review

Spirit of the Nikkei Fleet: BC’s Japanese Canadian Fishermen

As I was reading this book in the late summer of 2009, I was struck by the sharp difference between the heyday of British Columbia’s fishing industry as portrayed in Spirit of the Nikkei Fleet...

By Patricia Roy


book film review

Surveying Central British Columbia: A Photojournal of Frank Swannell, 1920-28

In Surveying Central British Columbia, Jay Sherwood offers us the second instalment of the exploits of provincial surveyor Frank Swannell, who spent nine seasons creating and connecting a survey network in the Upper Nechako country...

By Frank Leonard


book film review

Seeking Balance: Conversations with BC Women in Politics

BC women have made important gains in electoral politics over the past century. In the national context, British Columbia has led the way, being the first province to elect a female premier, the first to...

By Tina Block


book film review

I Am Full Moon: Stories of a Ninth Daughter

About a decade ago, I wrote a review article in this journal in which I expressed the hope that more first-hand accounts of growing up Japanese or Chinese in British Columbia would be published [1]....

By Patricia Roy


book film review

Where the Pavement Ends

Marie Wadden is a non-Aboriginal investigative journalist/network producer for CBC Radio who is based in St. John’s, Newfoundland. In 1981, she shared her home with two Innu youth who came to the city from Sheshatshiu,...

By Shelly Johnson


Contributors

Contributors

Brendan F.R. Edwards holds a doctorate in history (specializing in Native-Newcomer relations) from the University of Saskatchewan and master’s degrees from Trent and McGill universities. He is the author of Paper Talk: A History of Libraries, Print Culture, and Aboriginal Peoples in Canada before 1960 (Scarecrow, 2005) and articles on Aboriginal literacy and publishing in History of the Book in Canada (University of Toronto Press, 2005, 2007).

Daniel Heidt is a second year PhD candidate at the University of Western Ontario. His master’s thesis examined how Howard Green’s views on war developed during his lifetime. Daniel’s current research includes continuing work on Howard Green, as well as the Canadian arctic.

James Lawson is an Assistant Professor in Canadian Politics at the Department of Political Science, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC. His specialties are in Canadian Political Economy and Environmental Policy, with a particular emphasis on natural resource policy and politics.

Gordon W. Roe completed a PhD in anthropology at SFU in 2006 which examined harm reduction programs and community organizations in the Downtown Eastside (DES). He currently lives and does research in the
DES and teaches at various institutions in the Lower Mainland.

Margot Young is Associate Professor in the Faculty of Law, University of British Columbia. She is co-editor of Poverty: Rights, Social Citizenship and Legal Activism (UBC Press, 2008) and co-author of the report Possibilities and Prospects: The Debate Over a Guaranteed Income (CCPA, 2009).