We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (183)

Book Review

Christy Clark: Behind the Smile

According to Judi Tyabji this is “not an authorized biography. In fact, it’s not really a biography at all because she’s still premier.” Rather, it is “a book about Premier Clark written by someone who...

Review by Patricia Roy


article

Regional patterns of substance use in the homeless in British Columbia

By Isabelle Aube Linden, Gregory R Werker, Christian G Schutz, Marissa Y Mar, Michael Krausz, Kerry Jang


homelessness liquor and drugs substance use Prince George Vancouver Victoria

Book Review

The Salish Sea: Jewel of the Pacific Northwest

Audrey DeLella Benedict and Joseph Gaydos’s book about the Salish Sea, like Beamish and McFarlane’s recent tome on the Strait of Georgia (or North Salish Sea), The Sea Among Us, is a gorgeously illustrated and...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

The Life and Art of Jack Akroyd

Peter Busby’s The Life and Art of Jack Akroyd is the eighth and latest book in the Unheralded Artists Series presented by Mother Tongue Publishing. The series as a whole makes a significant contribution to...

Review by Kerry Mason


Book Review

Uncharted Waters: The Explorations of José Narváez (1768–1840)

Jim McDowell’s Uncharted Waters: The Explorations of José Narváez is a comprehensive examination of one of the most important and overlooked explorers of the Pacific Coast during the late eighteenth century. McDowell traces Narváez’s long career from his...

Review by Devon Drury


Book Review

Writing the Okanagan

George Bowering’s new anthology, Writing the Okanagan, is a collection of Bowering’s fiction associated through setting, choice of characters, or autobiographical referents, with the Okanagan, chiefly the South Okanagan, where he grew up. Many of...

Review by Ian Pooley


Book Review

Made in British Columbia: Eight Ways of Making Culture

At first glance, I was sceptical of Made in British Columbia. What more could possibly be written about painter Emily Carr or architects Francis Rattenbury and Arthur Erickson? But Maria Tippett’s carefully crafted biographies of...

Review by Michael Kluckner


Book Review

Names on a Cenotaph: Kootenay Lake Men in World War I

Sylvia Crooks’s Homefront and Battlefront: Nelson BC in World War II (2005) brought to life the lives of all the men honoured on the Nelson cenotaph and the impact of the war on their families...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

Legacy in Time: Three Generations of Mountain Photography in the Canadian West

British Columbia and Alberta are home to the most iconic mountain landscapes in Canada. To many of us, visitors and Canadians alike, these landscapes are the embodiment of Canada. They tempt us to stop, explore,...

Review by Mary Sanseverino


Book Review

The Bastard of Fort Stikine: The Hudson’s Bay Company and the Murder of John McLoughlin, Jr.

  During his round-the-world voyage in 1842, Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) Governor George Simpson arrived at Fort Stikine and discovered that chief trader John McLoughlin Jr. had been killed. Two recent books discuss this event....

Review by Corey Larson


Book Review

The Elusive Mr. Pond: The Soldier, Fur Trader and Explorer who Opened the Northwest

Barry Gough has masterfully grappled with the challenge of interpreting an important figure in the Canadian fur trade in his book, The Elusive Mr. Pond: The Soldier, Fur Trader and Explorer who Opened the Northwest....

Review by George Colpitts


Book Review

The Sea Among Us: The Amazing Strait of Georgia

Much of my critique of Beamish and McFarlane’s The Sea Among Us is that familiar reviewer’s refrain: they didn’t write the book that I would have. With the luxury of a dozen different writers, I...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

Closing Time: Prohibition, Rum-Runners, and Border Wars

The prohibition era has attracted much interest for generations. The American story — undoubtedly because of the violence, criminal involvement, and Hollywood exposure — has always overshadowed the somewhat milder, more complicated, and less linear...

Review by Wayne Norton