We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (232)

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Sounds Japanese Canadian to Me

Sounds Japanese Canadian to Me is a monthly podcast on Japanese Canadian history and culture. Produced and hosted by Raymond Nakamura and staff of the Nikkei National Museum, the episodes are structured as a casual...

Review by Carin Holroyd


Book Review

For Freedom We Will Fight, the Industrial Workers of the World in British Columbia 1905-1990

More than a hundred years after losing its prominence, the fabled Industrial Workers of the World continues to resonate as a union without parallel in the annals of labour history in North America. Besides the...

Review by Rod Mickleburgh


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

The Nameless Collective Podcast: Exploring History

Season one of the Nameless Collective, which is produced by Manjot Bains of JugniStyle and hosted by intrepid researchers, historians and archival explorers Naveen Girn, Milan Singh and Paneet Singh, evokes past South Asian Canadian...

Review by Satwinder Kaur Bains


Book Review

Solidarity: Canada’s Unknown Revolution of 1983

This is a book in search of a genre. As history, the curtain comes down on this story after a disappointing first night. But as theatre, it would undoubtedly have a longer and more satisfying...

Review by Bryan D. Palmer


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

RAVEN (De)Briefs Podcast: Indigenous Law in Action

Season one of the RAVEN (De)Briefs podcast series is a refreshing Indigenization of the traditional podcast format in that it evokes everyday kitchen table conversations among relatives, combined with sonic, Indigenous documentary. Exploring contemporary environmental...

Review by Lydia Toorenburgh


colonialism Delgamuukw v. BC Indigenous Indigenous rights treaties land claims law

Book Review

So You Girls Remember That: Memories of a Haida Elder

Every morning when I build the fire and when it start to go, if it’s scattered over, you have to poke it and put it together and it start to go. That’s the way life...

Review by Leslie A. Robertson


Book Review

A Liberal-Labour Lady: The Times and Life of Mary Ellen Spear Smith

Biographies offer such tantalizing opportunities.  Readers can generally look forward to either delving into the details of a fascinating life – the accomplishments and setbacks, the loves and losses – or they can be encouraged...

Review by P. E. Bryden


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

A Tradition of Evolution: The Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival

Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival: Vancouver, British Columbia, 25-26 May 2017. The festival featured film and new media presentations, including a “Turtle Island Shorts” program (May 26); VR and augmented reality presentations (May 27); and...

Review by Carleigh Baker


aboriginal art

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Pop Culture Confronts British Columbia’s Colonial History

Grand Theft Terra Firma: A Game of Imperial Stickup, Abbotsford, British Columbia, the Reach Gallery Museum, 17 January – 7 May 2017. The exhibition is augmented by several public events, including a live theatrical performance...

Review by Erika Balcombe


Book Review

The Bomb in the Wilderness: Photography and the Nuclear Era in Canada

John O’Brian’s recent book on the photographic representation of the nuclear age focuses on the Canadian context and readers with an interest in photography, atomic age culture, and Canadiana will not be disappointed. The Bomb...

Review by Karla McManus


Book Review

Capitals, Aristocrats, and Cougars: Victoria’s Hockey Professionals, 1911-26

Historians generally agree that hockey originated in eastern parts of Canada and later spread westward. In large part, this western migration of the sport followed the pattern of demographic movements. It is then not surprising...

Review by John Wong


Book Review

Step Into Wilderness: A Pictorial History of Outdoor Exploration in and Around the Comox Valley

Drawing primarily on a photographic collection held by the Courtenay and District Museum, Step into Wilderness considers “the theme of people living in the natural world and exploring both the opportunities it provides and the...

Review by Sarah Jacobs


Book Review

Captain Cook Rediscovered: Voyaging to the Icy Latitudes

On 12 July 1776 Captain James Cook, Royal Navy, sailed from Plymouth, England, in the three-master collier, Resolution, in search of the fabled Northwest Passage. It was a voyage that swept Cook and the crews...

Review by Barry Gough


Book Review

He Speaks Volumes: A Biography of George Bowering

The Canadian writers who rose (or leapt) to prominence in the 1960s and 1970s, and who are sometimes thought to be synonymous with Canadian literature itself, are now venerable. Although Margaret Atwood remains a formidable...

Review by Nicholas Bradley


Book Review

Postsecondary Education in British Columbia: Public Policy and Structural Development, 1960-2015

As distinct from previous historical accounts of postsecondary education in BC, Cowin makes it clear that he will cover the development of the “entire” postsecondary system in BC (3). For Cowin, this means the whole...

Review by Donald Fisher


Book Review

Talking Back to the Indian Act: Critical Readings in Settler Colonial Histories

History as an academic discipline recognizes that how we understand the past is no more than that. It is how we understand the past, and not necessarily what actually transpired in distant times that we...

Review by David Milward


Book Review

Vancouverism

It’s best to start any study with a clear, concise, and irrefutable sentence. But “Vancouver is a place” is taking that axiom too far. And, as anyone who knows horses will tell you, a place...

Review by John Douglas Belshaw


Book Review

The Hundred-Year Trek: A History of Student Life at UBC

To borrow an old joke, institutional histories can often be the sofa beds of historical writing. Neither good as a sofa nor as a bed, institutional histories can often find themselves trapped between academic and...

Review by Dale M. McCartney


Book Review

At the Bridge: James Teit and an Anthropology of Belonging

James Teit was an amazing community-based engaged anthropologist long before such labels were invented. Wendy Wickwire’s anthropological life story of Teit is a consummate account and indeed, as the top of page advertisement exhorts, it...

Review by Charles R. Menzies


Book Review

Gold Rush Manliness: Race and Gender on the Pacific Slope

Ten years and many miles separated two distinct, yet in some ways similar, gold rushes. In 1848, rumors of gold at Sutter’s Mill sparked a process that would lure roughly 265,000 people to California, a...

Review by Alice Gorton