We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (2529)

Review

In Twilight and in Dawn: A Biography of Diamond Jenness

At last there is a comprehensive biography of Diamond Jenness, perhaps Canada’s greatest anthropologist, and it’s an excellent one. Barnett Richling has risen to the task with a clear understanding of the man, his remarkable...

Review by Robin Ridington


Review

Trucking in British Columbia: An Illustrated History

Historians of British Columbia have devoted considerable attention to how its economy and social geography were shaped by different kinds of transportation, from sailing vessels and trails to wagon roads and railways. However, automobiles and...

Review by Ben Bradley


Review

Gathering Places: Aboriginal and Fur Trade Histories

Academic publishers seem to be shying away from festschriften these days, but there are good reasons for UBC Press to buck that trend with this book. The long-standing academic tradition of a scholar’s colleagues and...

Review by Scott Stephen


Review

Epidemic Encounters: Influenza, Society, and Culture in Canada, 1918-20

Epidemics call out the ambulance-chaser in all of us, and for health historians, there is none more attention-grabbing than the 1918-20 influenza pandemic, mistakenly dubbed the “Spanish Flu,” the only infectious disease to stop the...

Review by Megan Davies


Review

Jewels of the Qila: The Remarkable Story of an Indo-Canadian Family

Jewels of the Qila: The Remarkable Story of an Indo-Canadian Family, finds Hugh Johnston, the leading expert on early South Asian migration to Canada, on familiar terrain. This time Johnston provides a rare familial and...

Review by Ali Kazimi


Review

Who Killed Janet Smith?

In late July 1924 in a house in the upper crust neighbourhood of Shaughnessy Heights, Vancouver, around midday, a Scots nursemaid was found dead in the basement by the Chinese “house boy,” Wing Fong Sing....

Review by John McLaren


Review

The Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway: The Dunsmuir Years: 1884-1905

Originally, Robert Dunsmuir, the founder of the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway (E&N), had intended the southern terminus to be Esquimalt and the northern terminus to be Nanaimo, as the name suggests, but before he had...

Review by Bruce Hodding


Review

Standing Up with Ga’axsta’las: Jane Constance Cook and the Politics of Memory, Church, and Custom

Standing Up with Ga’axsta’las; Jane Constance Cook and the Politics of Memory, Church, and Custom follows one woman’s involvement with “colonial interventions” (407) into Kwa’waka’wakw economics, government, and religion in the late nineteenth and early...

Review by Andrew Cienski


Review

Journey with No Maps: A Life of P.K. Page

“ Who am I,” asks the narrator in an early poem, “Arras,” by P.K. Page, “or, who am I become…?”  (144). It’s a question Page was to return to many times, in both her literary...

Review by Barbara Peace


Review

Craigflower Country: A History of View Royal, 1850-1950

Craigflower country was the area of greater Victoria between the waters of the Gorge waterway and Esquimalt harbour. Today it is within the town of View Royal, to the northwest of the city. Craigflower was...

Review by Deidre Simmons


Review

Gardens Aflame: Garry Oak Meadows of BC’s South Coast

The Garry oak meadows of southern Vancouver Island are among the rarest ecosystems in Canada. In Gardens Aflame, Maleea Acker takes on the ambitious goal of relating the history and ecology of Garry oak meadows,...

Review by Jenny McCune


Review

Bluebacks and Silver Brights: A Lifetime in the BC Fisheries From Bounty to Plunder

For sixty years the Campbell Avenue fish dock on Burrard Inlet was the hub of Vancouver’s fishing industry, home to numerous fish plants, smokehouses, and floats where the boats tied up. The Safarik family business,...

Review by Kenneth Campbell


Review

The Principle of Tsawalk: An Indigenous Approach to Global Crisis

Do the theories and worldviews of the Enlightenment unfold all there is to know about reality? Can the political relationships between Canadians and Indigenous peoples be mended solely through Eurocentric remedies? Can settler Canadians and...

Review by Damien Lee


Review

Murder in the Chilcotin

Author Roy Innes can be forgiven for his less than stellar accuracy in depicting the Cariboo Chilcotin in his recent crime novel, Murder in the Chilcotin. His story-telling prowess, captivating story line, and intriguing plot...

Review by Sage Birchwater


Review

The Pathfinder: A.C. Anderson’s Journeys in the West

Alexander Caulfield Anderson was born to British parents on a plantation in India in 1814, raised and schooled in England, and in 1831 arrived in Lachine, Lower Canada, where he was promptly hired on as...

Review by Ken Brealey


Review

Nowhere Else on Earth: Standing Tall for the Great Bear Rainforest

The Great Bear Rainforest, also known as the North and Central Coast of British Columbia, is one of the last intact temperate rainforests left in the world. This region has received much attention since 1989,...

Review by Margaret (Maggie) Low


Review

Swift and Strong: The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught’s Own). A Pictorial History

Having dedicated Swift and Strong “To all Dukes, past, present and future,” the authors of this outstanding volume have successfully commemorated the life and times of the British Columbia Regiment (BCR), Duke of Connaught’s Own, a Vancouver-based...

Review by James Wood


Review

People of the Middle Fraser Canyon: An Archaeological History

The authors, from the departments of anthropology at the University of Montana (Prentiss) and the University of Notre Dame (Kuijt), draw on their extensive and recent archaeological work in the interior of British Columbia to...

Review by Douglas Hudson


Review

City Critters: Wildlife in the Urban Jungle

This beautifully illustrated volume introduces readers young and old to the diversity of wild animals that share urban environments with us. Through entertaining anecdotes and compelling and often humorous narrative, Nicholas Read explains where these...

Review by Jennifer Bonnell


Review

Discovering Indigenous Lands: The Doctrine of Discovery in the English Colonies

This brilliant volume of comparative law is written by four distinguished Indigenous legal academic specialists, from the United States (Eastern Shawnee Tribe), New Zealand (Maori — Ngati Rawkawa and Ngati Ranginui), Australia (Eualayai/Gammilaroi), and Canada...

Review by Daniel Clayton


Review

Discovering Totem Poles: A Traveller’s Guide

This well-illustrated and modest in size guidebook presents totem poles that a tourist could see on a trip from Seattle, Washington, to Juneau, Alaska. The focus in not on totem poles as art objects displaying...

Review by Alan Hoover


Review

British Columbia’s Inland Rainforest: Ecology, Conservation, and Management

“These two streams at the foot of the hills have formed a wide alluvial, on which are forest trees of enormous size; the white cedars were from fifteen to thirty six feet girth, clean grown...

Review by Andy MacKinnon


Review

The Sacred Headwaters: The Fight to Save the Stikine, Skeena and Nass

On 17 April 2012, Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver announced that his department would follow through on the Federal Conservative Party 2012 budget promise to “streamline” the Environmental Assessment process in Canada. The new process...

Review by Jonathan Peyton


Review

The Chuck Davis History of Metropolitan Vancouver

Everyone who has spent any time researching Vancouver history seems to have a Chuck Davis story. Here’s mine. It’s about 1980, I’m a callow not-easily-impressed grad student doing work on some arcane heritage tax law...

Review by John Belshaw