We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (547)

Review

Making Native Space: Colonialism, Resistance, and Reserves in British Columbia

OVERVIEW  IN MAKING NATIVE SPACE, Cole Harris describes how settlers displaced Aboriginal people from their land in British Columbia,1 painstakingly documenting the creation of Indian reserves in the province from the 1830s to 1938. Informed...

Review by Val Napoleon


Review

Canadian Aboriginal Art and Spirituality: A Vital Link

Canadian Aboriginal Art And Spirituality: A Vital Link acknowledges right from the start that Aboriginal art forms in Canada have historically been misinterpreted as mere “craft” and that the all-important spiritual foundations of such art...

Review by William Lindsay


Review

Civilizing the Wilderness: Culture and Nature in Pre-Confederation Canada and Rupert’s Land

  Newcomers to Canada and Rupert’s Land in the mid-nineteenth century brought with them an assortment of cultural baggage. A. A. den Otter reveals that the twinned concepts of “civilization” and “wilderness” formed the dominant...

Review by Jonathan Clapperton


Review

Where the Pavement Ends

Marie Wadden is a non-Aboriginal investigative journalist/network producer for CBC Radio who is based in St. John’s, Newfoundland. In 1981, she shared her home with two Innu youth who came to the city from Sheshatshiu,...

Review by Shelly Johnson


Review

In Search of Canadian Political Culture

In Search of Canadian Political Culture positions itself at the centre of debates over the nature of political culture in Canada, taking on disputes within what Alan Cairns would call the “sociological school” (behavioural versus...

Review by Dennis Pilon


Review

Aboriginal Peoples and Forest Lands in Canada

Forests, long of economic and socio-cultural importance to both Aboriginal peoples and settlers in Canada, have also been sites of contention between these groups, reflected in blockades, court action, and state policies intended to address...

Review by Brian Egan


Review

Wicihitowin: Aboriginal Social Work in Canada

“Wicihitowin” is a Cree word that describes the collective processes involved in helping/sharing with one another, and that is what the eleven First Nations, Métis, and Inuit social work educators across Canada have done with...

Review by Shelly Johnson


Review

Women and the White Man’s God: Gender and Race in the Canadian Mission Field

THOUGH THE ENCOUNTER between missionaries and Aboriginals continues to fascinate, the tables have dramatically turned. Where once missionaries saw it as part of their task to explain Aboriginal culture to a White society, in today’s...

Review by Margaret Die


Review

Uncertain Accommodation: Aboriginal Identity and Group Rights in the Supreme Court of Canada

The Supreme Court of Canada’s approach to Aboriginal identity is fraudulent and harmful to Indigenous peoples in Canada.  This is essentially the conclusion reached by Professor Panagos in his new book.  Although this conclusion is...

Review by Larry Chartrand


Review

In the Days of Our Grandmothers: A Reader in Aboriginal Women’s History in Canada

The issue of voice, its recuperation and responsible representation, has long ranked among Aboriginal history’s central concerns. In the Days of Our Grandmothers: A Reader in Aboriginal Women’s History in Canada shares this commitment. Refuting...

Review by Chelsea Horton


Review

Aboriginal Peoples and the Law: A Critical Introduction

Jim Reynolds, a highly experienced Aboriginal rights lawyer, pursues two ambitious aims with his new book, Aboriginal Peoples and the Law: A Critical Introduction. One is to provide a succinct yet comprehensive overview of Canadian law...

Review by David Milward


Review

Makuk: A New History of Aboriginal-White Relations

Makúk: A New History of Aboriginal-White Relations is a thorough treatment of a significant subject in BC history. Lutz has examined the history of exchanges of things, labour, and ideas between Aboriginal peoples and immigrants...

Review by Margaret Anderson


Review

Contact Zones: Aboriginal and Settler Women in Canada’s Colonial Past

This is a great time to be writing Aboriginal history. A decade of productive interplay between postcolonial studies, feminist analysis, and new methods of research has opened new interpretive pathways to historians of First Nations....

Review by Mary-Ellen Kelm


Review

Vancouver: A Novel

RECENTLY, THERE HAS BEEN a surge in sweeping popular portrayals of Canadian history and its Aboriginal origins, most notably in the CBC production Canada: A People’s History (2000) but also in the current theatrical Vancouver...

Review by Larry Grant


Review

Whose Culture Is It, Anyway? Community Engagement in Small Cities

Whose Culture Is It, Anyway? addresses important questions about the contribution of arts and culture in small and medium sized cities and the ethos and ethics of supporting cultural development in these environments. Small and...

Review by Eric Brown


Review

Creating Space: My Life and Work in Indigenous Education

There is no such thing as Indigenous education. There is only cross-cultural education containing negotiations between both Indigenous people and the settler societies that colonized them. Understanding the past is essential, but even if we...

Review by Michael Marker


Review

Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe

Most people identify Northwest Coast Aboriginal culture with the totem pole, most notably with the dramatic Thunderbird-winged carvings of the Kwakwaka’wakw Peoples. In Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe, Martine Reid and co-authors James Raffan and Michael...

Review by Maria Tippett


Review

Paddling Her Own Canoe: The Times and Texts of Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake)

POET, WRITER, storyteller, spokesperson, performer, actress, performance artist. Pauline Johnson is certainly the most public and popular writer that nineteenth-century Canada produced, and perhaps even the most public Canadian writer of the last century. Such...

Review by Armand Ruffo


Review

Blockades or Breakthroughs?: Aboriginal Peoples Confront the Canadian State

Canada is no stranger to Aboriginal direct action: “Oka, Ipperwash, Caledonia. Blockades, masked warriors, police snipers” (3). Citing this excerpt from the 2006 report of Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal peoples to introduce the collection...

Review by Sarah Nickel


Review

People, Politics, and Child Welfare in British Columbia

This is the most important book now available on children and public policy in British Columbia. Its contributions by engaged and thoughtful scholar-advocates should be required reading for all Canadians interested in the welfare of...

Review by Veronica Strong-Boag


Review

With Good Intentions: Euro-Canadian and Aboriginal Relations in Colonial Canada

We might as well name the elephant in the room. The editors did. The book’s first sentence, back cover, and promotional material all imply a fear that it will be received as “an apologist text”...

Review by Theodore Binnema


Review

The Power of Place, the Problem of Time: Aboriginal Identity and Historical Consciousness in the Cauldron of Colonialism

Keith Thor Carlson’s book focuses on the relationship between history and identity among the Stó:lō people of the Lower Fraser River between 1780 and 1906. He examines specific events and broad trends to demonstrate how...

Review by Madeline Knickerbocker


Review

Aboriginal Title and Indigenous Peoples: Canada, Australia, and New Zealand

“It is inconceivable, I think,” asserted Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau in 1969, “that in a given society, one section of the society have a treaty with the other section of the society. We must be...

Review by Cairns Alan


Review

Writing the West Coast: In Love with Place

In the two generations since the first postmodern attempts to create a pan-cultural literature of place on the Pacific Coast, the context of landscape writing in British Columbia has been radically transformed. The environmental movement...

Review by Harold Rhenisch