We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (63)

New Media / Exhibition Review

Screen Sovereignty: Indigenous Matriarch 4 Articulating the Future of Indigenous VR

 Indigenous matriarchs are changing the culture of the technology industry through virtual reality (VR). Indigenous Matriarch 4 (IM4) is the first Indigenous virtual reality media lab and is situated on the West Coast. Currently, it...

Review by Courteney Morin


new media technology virtual reality aboriginal art

New Media / Exhibition Review

In/consequential Relationships: Refusing Colonial Ethics of Engagement in Yuxweluptun’s Inherent Rights, Vision Rights

On the closing day of the Museum of Anthropology’s Unceded Territories exhibit of Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun’s art, crowds formed queues long enough to snake through the halls and to pack the exhibit space for the...

Review by Sarah King


Yuxweluptun Lawrence Paul

New Media / Exhibition Review

A Tradition of Evolution: The Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival

Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival: Vancouver, British Columbia, 25-26 May 2017. The festival featured film and new media presentations, including a “Turtle Island Shorts” program (May 26); VR and augmented reality presentations (May 27); and...

Review by Carleigh Baker


aboriginal art

Review

Behind the Steam: The Inside Story of the Gastown Steam Clock

With a seemingly permanent cluster of tourists snapping its photo, the Gastown steam clock is undoubtedly one of the most popular tourist attractions in Vancouver. Despite its misleading Edwardian appearance (it was built in the...

Review by Lani Russwurm


Review

The Canadian Pacific’s Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway: The CPR steam years, 1905-1949

While the roundhouses are now mostly silent and only the occasional freight train makes its way up and down the island, the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway (E&N) occupies a prominent place in Vancouver Island’s history....

Review by David Hill-Turner


Review

Above the Bush: A Century of Climbing on Vancouver Island, 1912-2012

In 1968, Mike Walsh did a solo ascent of Vancouver Island’s second highest peak, Mount Colonel Foster in Strathcona Park, “without rope or pitons,” an approach he did not recommend to others (67). Reporting on...

Review by Jenny Clayton


Review

Asserting Native Resilience: Pacific Rim Indigenous Nations Face the Climate Crisis

For the past five centuries, Indigenous people of the Pacific Rim have been on the receiving, destructive end of European expansion and technology, witnessing their lands occupied by extractive, industrialized nation states. Now assimilated into...

Review by Chris Arnett


Review

High Boats: A Century of Salmon Remembered

The commercial salmon fishery has recently inspired a spate of books on the fading of the salmon industry. This volume fits into that literature. Among its special virtues are its basis in a specific area...

Review by Keith Ralston


Review

New Perspectives on the Gold Rush

Under editor Kathryn Bridge, New Perspectives on the Gold Rush teams up academic historians, archaeologists, and museum professionals in an effort to add previously marginalized voices to traditional histories of British Columbia’s gold rush. Despite...

Review by Mica Jorgenson


Review

A Modern Life: Art and Design in British Columbia, 1945-1960

An early and still not inappropriate epithet for Vancouver is Terminal City. This epithet denotes not only a peripheral cultural as well as a geographical location but also the city’s potential for development, despite its...

Review by Rhodri Windsor-Liscombe


Review

Orienting Canada: Race, Empire and the Transpacific

The history of Canada’s Pacific relations has long been a neglected subject. The general consensus was that Pacific relations were not central to understanding the history of the country and its place in the world....

Review by Laura Madokoro


Review

The Manly Modern: Masculinity in Postwar Canada

Theorists of modernity have often been particularly blind to the roles of gender. In numerous otherwise thought-provoking theoretical works on modernity, gender either disappears from the analysis or is treated awkwardly. Historians, to a degree,...

Review by Jarrett Rudy


Review

Home Truths: Highlights from BC History

As co-editors of BC Studies, Richard Mackie and Graeme Wynn surveyed all the essays published in the journal since it first appeared in 1968 before deciding to focus on what they concluded were two dominant...

Review by J.I. Little


Review

Family Origin Histories: The Whaling Indians: West Coast Legends and Stories, Part 11 of the Sapir-Thomas Nootka Texts

What do the stories of lineage significance say about the people who tell them? What is culturally salient to the tellers of the stories? What is culturally salient to the hearers of the stories, be...

Review by Marlene Atleo


Review

The Afterthought: West Coast Rock Posters and Recollections

Jerry Kruz’s beautifully illustrated autobiographical work provides an intriguing first hand glimpse of Vancouver psychedelic music scene. The book revolves around Kruz’s years as a concert promoter from 1966 to 1969. Although it briefly describes...

Review by Henry Trim


Review

Encyclopedia of Literature in Canada

THE TASK APPEARS straightforward – in this case, to read W.H. New’s monumental Encyclopedia ofLiterature in Canada for information on BC writing. There is, usefully, an entry on British Columbia (unsigned, meaning “written by New”):...

Review by Richard Lane


Review

The Nature of Gold: An Environmental History of the Klondike Gold Rush

THE NATURE OF GOLD is in several ways a path-breaking work since, although there is a large literature on Yukon environment, there has been very little written on the environmental history of the Territory, and...

Review by William Morrison