We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (683)

Book Review

Secwépemc People, Land, and Laws: Yerí7 re Stsq’ey’s-kucw

Marianne and Ron Ignace are members of the Secwépemc First Nation in south-central British Columbia.  Ron was raised by his great-grandparents, grew up speaking Secwepemctsín, and is a former Chief.  Both Ron and Marianne have...

Review by Robin Ridington


Book Review

Native Peoples and Water Rights: Irrigation, Dams, and the Law in Western Canada

Making the jump from studies of static property such as land to the fluid resource of water, Kenichi Matsui’s Native Peoples and Water Rights explores new territory by examining the intersection of Aboriginal rights and...

Review by Jenny Clayton


Book Review

Ghost Dancing with Colonialism: Decolonization and Indigenous Rights at the Supreme Court of Canada

In this book, Grace Li Xiu Woo, a retired member of the BC Bar, steps away from a standard case law analysis and instead analyzes Supreme Court decisions related to Aboriginal and treaty rights based...

Review by Hadley Friedland


Book Review

Civilizing the Wilderness: Culture and Nature in Pre-Confederation Canada and Rupert’s Land

  Newcomers to Canada and Rupert’s Land in the mid-nineteenth century brought with them an assortment of cultural baggage. A. A. den Otter reveals that the twinned concepts of “civilization” and “wilderness” formed the dominant...

Review by Jonathan Clapperton


Book Review

The Heavens are Changing: Nineteenth-Century Protestant Missions and Tsimshian Christianity

WRITING IN Moon of Wintertime: Missionaries and the Indians of Canada in Encounter since 1534 (University of Toronto Press, 1984, 250) of seventeenth-century Jesuit missions to the Huron, John Webster Grant quoted a Huron man...

Review by J.R. Miller


Book Review

Paddling Her Own Canoe: The Times and Texts of Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake)

POET, WRITER, storyteller, spokesperson, performer, actress, performance artist. Pauline Johnson is certainly the most public and popular writer that nineteenth-century Canada produced, and perhaps even the most public Canadian writer of the last century. Such...

Review by Armand Ruffo


Book Review

Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe

Most people identify Northwest Coast Aboriginal culture with the totem pole, most notably with the dramatic Thunderbird-winged carvings of the Kwakwaka’wakw Peoples. In Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe, Martine Reid and co-authors James Raffan and Michael...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

Never Shoot a Stampede Queen: A Rookie Reporter in the Cariboo

Never Shoot a Stampede Queen tells the story of a twenty-two-year-old university graduate from Vancouver adapting to life in Williams Lake in the 1980s after he accidentally landed a job there as a community newspaper...

Review by Jenny Clayton


Book Review

British Columbia: Land of Promises

This delightful book is Volume 5 of Oxford University Press’s six-volume Illustrated History of Canada. As the authors note in the introduction, the series is “uniquely Canadian” because the volumes are not shaped by chronology...

Review by Robert Campbell


Book Review

The True Story of Canada’s “War” of Extermination on the Pacific plus The Tsilhqot’in and Other First Nations Resistance

One should always be skeptical of books when the title proclaims them to be the “true story” on any aspect of history. For truth, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder. Tom Swanky’s...

Review by Robin Fisher


Book Review

Indigenous Women, Work, and History 1940-1980

Historian Patrick Wolfe has foregrounded the contradictory condition of Indigenous labour within Euro-American settlement by arguing that mythic narratives of settler diligence coexisted with a heavy reliance on colonized Indigenous labour. As he observes in...

Review by Carol Williams


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Konelīne: our land beautiful

As the language and culture director for the Tahltan Nation and a Tahltan academic, I believe giving voice to our people is crucial. Until recent times, the academy has privileged the voices of settlers and...

Review by Matthew Gartner


Book Review

Missing Women, Missing News: Covering Crisis in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside

In a publication coincident with the launch of the inquiry into the police investigation of convicted serial killer Robert Pickton, David Hugill’s Missing Women, Missing News poses a vital and timely challenge to common-sense frames...

Review by Tyler McCreary


Book Review

Images from the Likeness House

At the start of Images from the Likeness House, Dan Savard tells us why the photographs he presents of Aboriginal people are important. Put succinctly, it is because of their past and continuing influence on...

Review by Jennifer Cador


Book Review

High Boats: A Century of Salmon Remembered

The commercial salmon fishery has recently inspired a spate of books on the fading of the salmon industry. This volume fits into that literature. Among its special virtues are its basis in a specific area...

Review by Keith Ralston


Book Review

Plants of Haida Gwaii

FOR THOSE SCHOLARS conducting research within First Nations communities at this postcolonial moment in academic history, old rules do not apply. One must navigate a rearranged landscape made up of new challenges and opportunities. First...

Review by Douglas Deur


Book Review

Far West: The Story of British Columbia

When I received this book by this popular and prolific writer, I thought it was a coffee table history of British Columbia. While Far West is large and glossy, I quickly realized that BC Studies...

Review by Robert Campbell


Book Review

Liberalism, Surveillance, and Resistance: Indigenous Communities in Western Canada, 1877-1927

The negotiation and signing of the numbered treaties with First Nations groups in Western Canada, followed shortly thereafter by the opening of the territory to Euro-Canadian settlement, served to consolidate the country’s sovereignty over the...

Review by Heather Devine


Book Review

The Gold Will Speak For Itself: Peter Leech and Leechtown

Vancouver Island has a distinctive personality among the regions of British Columbia, one that has been shaped in complex ways by geography and history. The books reviewed here vary in their candlepower, but all of...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Screen Sovereignty: Indigenous Matriarch 4 Articulating the Future of Indigenous VR

 Indigenous matriarchs are changing the culture of the technology industry through virtual reality (VR). Indigenous Matriarch 4 (IM4) is the first Indigenous virtual reality media lab and is situated on the West Coast. Currently, it...

Review by Courteney Morin


new media technology virtual reality aboriginal art

Book Review

People of the Saltwater: An Ethnography of the Gitlax m’oon.

 “Gitlax m’oon, people of the saltwater” are more commonly known as the Gitxaala; their principal village, Lach Klan is located on what is now called Dolphin Island, a little to the south of Prince Rupert....

Review by Robert M. Galois


Book Review

People’s Citizenship Guide: A Response to Conservative Canada

People’s Citizenship Guide: A Response to Conservative Canada is just that. It uses Discover Canada, the new Canadian Citizenship Guide, as a launch pad for critiquing the current federal government’s ideological leanings, leanings expressed in...

Review by Elise Chenier


Book Review

Nature’s Northwest: The North Pacific Slope in the Twentieth Century

In Nature’s Northwest, William G. Robbins and Katrine Barber have synthesized a wealth of scholarship on the Greater Northwest, encompassing Idaho, Oregon, Washington, western Montana, and southern British Columbia. The authors track social, economic, political,...

Review by Richard Rajala