We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (18)

Review

Militia Myths: Ideas of the Canadian Citizen Soldier, 1896-1921

The Canadian Scottish (Princess Mary’s) regiment recently celebrated its 100th anniversary. Popularly known as the Can Scots, it is the only militia unit on Vancouver Island. The regiment had previously been honoured with the freedom...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Review

For King and Country: 150 Years of the Royal Westminster Regiment

The setting sun of the British Columbia flag provides a fitting background for the regimental colours of the Royal Westminster Regiment. Authorized in 1863 by Governor James Douglas as the New Westminster Volunteer Rifles, in...

Review by James Wood


Review

Vancouver’s Bessborough Armoury: a History. Vancouver: The Fifteenth Field Artillery

Victor Stevenson’s longstanding personal and professional attachment to Vancouver’s Bessborough Armoury is reflected in his concise and well-researched account of the building’s history. Having served as both honourary colonel of the 15th Field Artillery Regiment,...

Review by James Wood


Review

Swift and Strong: The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught’s Own). A Pictorial History

Having dedicated Swift and Strong “To all Dukes, past, present and future,” the authors of this outstanding volume have successfully commemorated the life and times of the British Columbia Regiment (BCR), Duke of Connaught’s Own, a Vancouver-based...

Review by James Wood


Review

Seeing Reds: The Red Scare of 1918-1919, Canada’s First War on Terror

In Seeing Reds: The Red Scare of 1918-1919, Canada’s First War on Terror, Daniel Francis provides an overview of the response of the Canadian state and elite to the postwar labour revolt. Although written for...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

Stanley Park’s Secret: The Forgotten Families of Whoi Whoi, Kanaka Ranch and Brockton Point

Jean Barman brings clarity to a long misunderstood part of the early history of Vancouver and British Columbia. Building upon earlier re-search on Stanley Park by William C. McKee (Urban History Review 3 [1978]), Robert...

Review by Sean Kheraj


Review

When Coal Was King: Ladysmith in the Coal-Mining Industry on Vancouver Island

WHEN COAL WAS KING, Ladysmith was a small, undistinguished pit-town, one of thousands around the industrializingworld. On the eve of the Great War, Ladysmith’s population barely passed 3,200. Compared with Nanaimo or Cumberland, let alone...

Review by John Belshaw


Review

Company Towns of the Pacific Northwest

COMPANY TOWNS – once ubiquitous across the greater North American West – usually originated in the corporate need for labour in isolated areas of resource extraction. Even those who remember favourably their experiences in company...

Review by William Robbins


Review

For King and Kanata: Canadian Indians and the First World War

Exploring the participation of Canadian First Nations in the First World War, Timothy Winegard takes aim at two historiographical problems: the tendency to simply insert Aboriginal military contributions where they have been otherwise ignored, and...

Review by Sarah Nickel


Review

Time Travel: Tourism and the Rise of the Living History Museum in Mid-Twentieth-Century Canada

We all remember them. I know that I do. Having spent a summer in my youth washing dishes at Fort Steele heritage town, I remember the wooden boardwalks, the ramshackle buildings, the yellow school buses...

Review by Sean MacPherson


Review

The Elusive Mr. Pond: The Soldier, Fur Trader and Explorer who Opened the Northwest

Barry Gough has masterfully grappled with the challenge of interpreting an important figure in the Canadian fur trade in his book, The Elusive Mr. Pond: The Soldier, Fur Trader and Explorer who Opened the Northwest....

Review by George Colpitts


Review

From the West Coast to the Western Front: British Columbians and the Great War

  When Mark Forsythe, host of CBC Radio’s mid-day show, BC Almanac, and journalist-producer Greg Dickson discovered that they were both involved in a personal quest to learn about great-uncles and grandfathers who had served...

Review by James Wood


Review

Boundless Optimism: Richard McBride’s British Columbia

Patricia E. Roy’s Boundless Optimism: Richard McBride’s British Columbia examines the political career of one of the province’s most significant premiers. Born in New Westminster in 1870 and educated at New Westminster High School and...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

The Canadian Rangers: A Living History

Today the Canadian Rangers are noted as a unique unit within the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), created to establish a military presence in remote coastal and northern regions by utilizing mainly Aboriginal volunteers. Lackenbauer’s extensive...

Review by James Wood