We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (408)

Review

Schooling in Transition: Readings in Canadian History of Education

This collection of essays is edited by Sara Burke, a historian, and Patrick Milewski, a sociologist and former elementary school teacher, at Laurentian University. The title, Schooling in Transition, reflects the editors’ belief that public...

Review by Patrick A. Dunae


Review

Death in the Peaceable Kingdom: Canadian History since 1867 Through Murder, Execution, Assassination and Suicide

Two decades ago, a prominent conservative academic smacked down Canadian university instructors with the provocatively-titled Who Killed Canadian History? J.L. Granatstein’s answer was, in part, social history and the historians who taught it. Social historian...

Review by Larry Hannant


Review

Partisanship, Globalization, and Canadian Labour Market Policy: Four Provinces in Comparative Perspective

This is a book that I will use in two of my university courses: one on Canadian political economy and the other on labour policy. It is well researched, deals with issues that have immediate...

Review by Marjorie Cohen


Review

Back to the Land: Ceramics from Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands, 1970-1985

Earning a decent living from pottery is difficult. Crafts, in general, do not support high earners. The notion that any amateur can throw a pot has kept professional potters just above the poverty line —...

Review by Maria Tippett


Review

The Punjabis in British Columbia: Location, Labour, First Nations, and Multiculturalism

Kamala Elizabeth Nayar’s groundbreaking work, The Punjabis in British Columbia, represents a significant addition to a number of fields. At a basic level, it focuses on the important but sorely understudied community of Punjabis who...

Review by Anne Murphy


Review

People, Politics, and Child Welfare in British Columbia

This is the most important book now available on children and public policy in British Columbia. Its contributions by engaged and thoughtful scholar-advocates should be required reading for all Canadians interested in the welfare of...

Review by Veronica Strong-Boag


Review

Before and After the State: Politics, Poetics, and People(s) in the Pacific Northwest

The authors of Before and After the State: Politics, Poetics, and People(s) in the Pacific Northwest attempt to expand our understanding of the development of two nations, and a border between them, from a mostly political story...

Review by Brandon Dimmel


Review

Unbuilt Victoria

What if? Ah yes, that perennial question. What would a city look like if the “unbuilt” were actually built? What if a municipality’s proposed plans were followed “to a tee”? Sometimes the rejection of a...

Review by Larry McCann


Review

Landscape Architecture in Canada

Landscape Architecture in Canada is Ron Williams’ magnum opus, the likely capstone of a distinguished career as researcher, teacher, and practitioner. It is a fine scholarly effort, more than fifteen years in the making. Until...

Review by Larry McCann


Review

Webs of Empire: Locating New Zealand’s Past

A student in search of a thesis topic or a scholar seeking to understand the shape of historical writing in New Zealand over the past fifty years need go no further. In this collection of...

Review by Kenton Storey


Review

Taking My Life

In 2008, when researching Canadian women authors, Linda Morra discovered an unpublished autobiography written by Jane Rule in the 1980s, just before her retirement from writing, in which she recounts with frankness and humour her...

Review by Cameron Duder


Review

The Kelowna Story: An Okanagan History

Sharron Simpson’s The Kelowna Story offers her clear intention of providing for the people of Kelowna, most of whom are recent arrivals, “a collective memory” (9) about the origin and development of their community. Overall,...

Review by David Dendy


Review

Hills of Silver: The Yukon’s Mighty Keno Hill Mine

Aaro Aho’s book serves several masters. First and foremost, it is the song of Keno Hill and those who prospected, worked, and lived the life of the rich silver-lead mines. Silver ore was first discovered...

Review by Logan Hovis


Review

A Thousand Dreams: Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside and the Fight for Its Future

A Thousand Dreams is a very thorough, if partisan, overview of the events in the Downtown Eastside (DES) over the last twenty years. The partisan aspect is due to the overwhelming voice of Larry Campbell...

Review by Gordon Roe


Review

Borderline Crime: Fugitive Criminals and the Challenge of the Border

Bradley Miller, an assistant professor of history at the University of British Columbia, has produced an unprecedented look at the patchwork development of the law as it pertains to the Canada-U.S. border over the course...

Review by Brandon Dimmel


Review

Family Origin Histories: The Whaling Indians: West Coast Legends and Stories, Part 11 of the Sapir-Thomas Nootka Texts

What do the stories of lineage significance say about the people who tell them? What is culturally salient to the tellers of the stories? What is culturally salient to the hearers of the stories, be...

Review by Marlene Atleo


Review

The Power of Feasts: From Prehistory to Present

In the Power of Feasts, Hayden, an SFU archaeologist, provides a “theoretical synthesis” of the history of feasting, explains the theory of its influence on human societies over time, and argues that feasting contributed to...

Review by Deidre Cullon


Review

Engaging the Line: How the Great War Shaped the Canada-US Border 

That the Great War changed boundaries and upset communities is not news to anyone who looks at an historical atlas of Europe.  That the war affected communities living along what is often referred to as ‘the...

Review by Chris Leach


Review

French Canadians, Furs, and Indigenous Women in the Making of the Pacific Northwest

Since the sixteenth century, intrepid French Canadians have traversed the North American landscape to the very edges of the continent, and established families and communities in virtually every region north of Mexico. Given this legacy...

Review by Heather Devine