BC Studies 181 (Spring 2014)

BC Studies 181 (Spring 2014)

Price
$20.00

Our Spring 2014 issue features a Photo Essay on Victoria's Uplands by Larry McCann as well as articles by Jordan Stanger-Ross, Lynne Marks, Jennifer Silver, and Christopher Herbert.

Photo Essay
John Olmsted’s Uplands: “Victoria’s Celebrated Residential Park”
by
Larry McCann
Book & Film Reviews
Debating Dissent: Canada and the Sixties
Issue BC Studies 181 (Spring 2014)

by Lara Campbell, Dominique Clément, and Gregory S. Kealey, Editors

- Reviewed by Nancy Janovicek (pg: 146-47)

K'esu': The Art and Life of Doug Cranmer
Issue BC Studies 181 (Spring 2014)

by Jennifer Kramer with Gloria Cranmer Webster and Stolen Roth

- Reviewed by Carolyn Butler Palmer (pg: 155-57)

Alpine Anatomy: The Mountain Art of Arnold Shives
Issue BC Studies 181 (Spring 2014)

by John Grande, Edward Lucie-Smith, Darrin J. Martens, Toni Onley, Glenn Woodsworth, Bill Jeffries

- Reviewed by Devon Smither (pg: 158-59)

Bibliography of BC
Contributors

181

Christopher Herbert is an Assistant Professor of History at Co- lumbia Basin College in Pasco, Washington. His recent publications include a chapter in the forthcoming Conspiracy Theories in the United States and the Middle East: A Comparative Approach from De Gruyter Press and “‘Life’s Prizes Are by Labor Got’: Risk, Reward, and White Manliness in the California Gold Rush” in the Pacific Historical Review.

Lynne Marks teaches Canadian history at the Department of History at the University of Victoria. She is the author of Revivals and Roller Rinks: Religion, Leisure and Identity in Late Ninteenth Century Small Town Ontario, has published a range of articles on gender and the social history of religion, and is completing a manuscript for ubc Press on religion and irreligion in late nineteenth and early twentieth century British Columbia.

Larry McCann, a long-time student of Canadian suburbanization and a dedicated teacher, is a Professor Emeritus of Geography at the University of Victoria. His work in both spheres has been recognized by an Outstanding Achievement Award of the Heritage Society of BC, an award of merit from the Hallmark Society of Victoria, an award for teaching excellence from the University of Victoria, and the Massey Medal of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society.

Jennifer Silver is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Guelph. Currently, she is leading or collaborating on projects that explore the dynamics and governance possibilities for contested ocean spaces and marine resources in British Columbia, international oceans governance and oceans negotiations at 

Rio+20, and the cultural politics of “the sustainable seafood movement.” Across these, she seeks to explain the influence of power and politics in decision-making and, where possible, to v relate this to social-ecological outcomes. She grew up in coastal Nova Scotia and has had the good fortune to work in coastal communities in British Columbia and the Turks and Caicos Islands.

Jordan Stanger-Ross is Associate Professor of History at the Uni- versity of Victoria. His research and writing focus on the history of immigration, race, and inequality in twentieth century North America. This article is part of his larger ongoing project on the dispossession of Japanese Canadians, tentatively entitled “Suspect Properties.”