We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (450)

Book Review

Quietly Shrinking Cities: Canadian Urban Population Loss in an Age of Growth

Growth is good and small is beautiful. These two mid-twentieth century mottos continue to influence thinking about cities. On balance, Queen’s University geographer Maxwell Hartt would say that the former continues to hold sway more...

Review by John Douglas Belshaw


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Mission Transition: Clean Energy and Beyond (Season 1 and 2)

In 2018 and 2019, Sierra Club BC, through the leadership of Caitlyn Vernon and former CBC host and broadcaster, Susan Elrington, released an episodic educational podcast resource called Mission Transition: Clean Energy and Beyond.  This...

Review by Nick Stanger


Book Review

A Great Revolutionary Wave: Women and the Vote in British Columbia

A core rationale for this book series, Lara Campbell explains, is the necessity to “tell regional stories” about the women’s suffrage movement (13). Campbell demonstrates, for example, that the absence of a party system in...

Review by Barbara J. Messamore


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

The Nameless Collective Podcast: Exploring History

Season one of the Nameless Collective, which is produced by Manjot Bains of JugniStyle and hosted by intrepid researchers, historians and archival explorers Naveen Girn, Milan Singh and Paneet Singh, evokes past South Asian Canadian...

Review by Satwinder Kaur Bains


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

The Transect Podcast Review

The world of British Columbian archaeology is, to most, unknown and inaccessible. This is a shame, particularly in a province whose settler population has such a poor grasp of its long human history. Archaeology is...

Review by Eric Simons


Book Review

Able to Lead: Disablement, Radicalism, and the Political Life of E.T. Kingsley

Eugene Thornton Kingsley, an influential socialist in early British Columbia, was 33 years old when he adopted his revolutionary stance.  Employed as a brakeman on a railway in rural Montana in 1890, he fell between...

Review by Janet Nicol


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Not your usual science: a Future Ecologies Podcast Review

Future Ecologies is not your typical science podcast. Strongly reminiscent of Radiolab (2002–), the renowned WNYC series from the “golden age” of podcasting (Berry 2015), Future Ecologies investigates “the shape of our world,” or the...

Review by Milena Droumeva


Book Review

Capitals, Aristocrats, and Cougars: Victoria’s Hockey Professionals, 1911-26

Historians generally agree that hockey originated in eastern parts of Canada and later spread westward. In large part, this western migration of the sport followed the pattern of demographic movements. It is then not surprising...

Review by John Wong


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Screen Sovereignty: Indigenous Matriarch 4 Articulating the Future of Indigenous VR

 Indigenous matriarchs are changing the culture of the technology industry through virtual reality (VR). Indigenous Matriarch 4 (IM4) is the first Indigenous virtual reality media lab and is situated on the West Coast. Currently, it...

Review by Courteney Morin


new media technology virtual reality aboriginal art

Book Review

Beyond Rights: The Nisga’a Final Agreement and the Challenges of Modern Treaty Relationships

Most Canadians are aware of the existence of treaties between Indigenous peoples and the Crown. Phrases like “treaty rights” and “treaty relationships” form part of the everyday political vocabulary at every level of our federal...

Review by Joshua Nichols


Book Review

Creating Indigenous Property: Power, Rights, and Relationships

Is it possible for two entirely different legal frameworks, built by ontologically diverse and frequently disparate parties, to coexist under one judicial system? This question would be difficult enough when considering two parties on equal...

Review by Christopher Martin


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

In/consequential Relationships: Refusing Colonial Ethics of Engagement in Yuxweluptun’s Inherent Rights, Vision Rights

On the closing day of the Museum of Anthropology’s Unceded Territories exhibit of Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun’s art, crowds formed queues long enough to snake through the halls and to pack the exhibit space for the...

Review by Sarah King


Yuxweluptun Lawrence Paul

Book Review

Deep and Sheltered Waters: The History of Tod Inlet

In Deep and Sheltered Waters: The History of Tod Inlet, David R. Gray – with a Foreword from his long-time friends and colleagues, Nancy J. Turner and Robert D. Turner – sets out to illuminate...

Review by Jacquelyn Miller


Book Review

Big Promises, Small Government: Doing Less with Less in the BC Liberal New Era

George Abbott was a cabinet minister for twelve years in the BC Liberal governments of Gordon Campbell and Christy Clark.  In Big Promises, Small Government, he reflects on his tenure in the first Campbell government...

Review by Stephen Phillips


Book Review

Inalienable Properties: The Political Economy of Indigenous Land Reform

In Inalienable Properties: the political economy of Indigenous land reform (2020), Jamie Baxter presents his readers with a puzzle surrounding the inalienability of Indigenous land tenure systems. Baxter asks, ‘why does inalienable property persist in...

Review by Jonathan Boron


Book Review

Civilian Internment in Canada: Histories and Legacies

“There is no single historiography of internment” in Canada, write Rhonda L. Hinter and Jim Mochoruk in the introduction of this ambitious collection of essays (9-10). Siloed histories of particular internments, they suggest, convey episodic...

Review by Jordan Stanger-Ross


Book Review

The Elements of Indigenous Style: A Guide for Writing By and About Indigenous Peoples

Gregory Younging’s (1961-2019) The Elements of Indigenous Style is a testament to how prioritizing listening to Indigenous peoples, instead of merely writing about them, can both change the way settlers view their relationship with Indigenous peoples...

Review by Mercedes Peters


Book Review

Iroquois in the West

Sometimes the most detailed and poignant histories emerge from historical fragments. In Iroquois in the West Jean Barman uses what she calls “slivers of stories from the shadows of the past” to tell a rich...

Review by Dane Allard


Book Review

Surveying the 120th Meridian and the Great Divide: The Alberta-BC Boundary Survey, 1918-1924

In this, his ninth monograph on surveying in BC, Jay Sherwood returns with the second of two volumes on the work of the Alberta-BC Boundary Survey in the early twentieth century.  The first installment, Surveying...

Review by Jason Grek-Martin