We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (203)

Book Review

The Pathfinder: A.C. Anderson’s Journeys in the West

Alexander Caulfield Anderson was born to British parents on a plantation in India in 1814, raised and schooled in England, and in 1831 arrived in Lachine, Lower Canada, where he was promptly hired on as...

Review by Ken Brealey


Book Review

People of the Middle Fraser Canyon: An Archaeological History

The authors, from the departments of anthropology at the University of Montana (Prentiss) and the University of Notre Dame (Kuijt), draw on their extensive and recent archaeological work in the interior of British Columbia to...

Review by Douglas Hudson


Book Review

The Chuck Davis History of Metropolitan Vancouver

Everyone who has spent any time researching Vancouver history seems to have a Chuck Davis story. Here’s mine. It’s about 1980, I’m a callow not-easily-impressed grad student doing work on some arcane heritage tax law...

Review by John Belshaw


Book Review

Angus McDonald of the Great Divide: The Uncommon Life of a Fur Trader 1816-1889

The Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) has been the source for North American historians since the late nineteenth century. From the beginnings of it adventures in the fur trade, the Company’s head office in London sent...

Review by Deidre Simmons


Book Review

Voyages: to the New World and Beyond

This is a book about ships, large and small, and of their experiences mainly in the line of exploration and discovery. From the mid-fifteenth to the mid-nineteenth centuries the world’s oceans and distant annexes were...

Review by Barry Gough


Book Review

Creative Subversions: Whiteness, Indigeneity, and the National Imaginary

In Creative Subversions, Margot Francis starts from the premise that some of the key images that inform Canadian national identity, such as the beaver, the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), national parks, and Indians are “public...

Review by Chris Herbert


Book Review

Long Beach Wild: A Celebration of People and Place on Canada’s Rugged Western Shore

Long Beach Wild is the kind of book that academics are often quick to dismiss. It’s popular history, after all (academics, of course, preferring unpopular histories), by a freelance writer whose many previous works include...

Review by Philip Van Huizen


Book Review

The Journals of William Fraser Tolmie, Physician and Fur Trader

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 5, Summer 1970

Review by Victor Hopwood


Book Review

Exploring Fort Vancouver

This fine volume is truly a “must” for those with more than a passing interest in the origins of the multi-ethnic area of the Pacific Northwest Coast, from the Aboriginal inhabitants to the eighteenth and...

Review by Stanley Copp


Book Review

A Hard Man to Beat: The Story of Bill White, Labour Leader, Historian, Shipyard Worker, Raconteur

Selected as one of ten Vancouver books reprinted to celebrate the city’s 125th anniversary, A Hard Man to Beat is perhaps even more important now than when it was first published. Then, Bill White’s lively...

Review by Mark Leier


Book Review

Canada’s Road to the Pacific War: Intelligence, Strategy, and the Far East Crisis

Canada’s Road to the Pacific War examines the role of intelligence in Canadian strategic planning during the year preceding the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Drawing on archival resources in Canada, Britain, and the United...

Review by James Wood


Book Review

Raincoast Chronicles 21: West Coast Wrecks and Other Maritime Tales

Tales of shipwrecks along British Columbia’s coast have focused on adventure and tragedy since the fur trade era. With marine transportation occupying such an important role in our daily lives, it is remarkable that so...

Review by David Hill-Turner


Book Review

The Nature of Borders: Salmon, Boundaries, and Bandits on the Salish Sea

Lissa Wadewitz’s The Nature of Borders offers valuable insights into the shifting nature of boundaries on the Salish Sea and their significance for the Pacific salmon swimming through it. These fish traverse the sea on...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

Measure of the Year: Reflections on Home, Family, and a Life Fully Lived

As part of its ‘Classics West Collection’ Touch Wood Editions has released a trade paperback edition of Measure of the Year, Roderick Haig-Brown’s celebrated collection of seasonal essays, with a foreword by poet Brian Brett....

Review by Des Kennedy


Book Review

Feeding the Family: 100 Years of Food and Drink in Victoria

Until the later decades of the past century, historical writing was by men, about men, and for men. Narratives of the past made room for a queen, and the odd Laura Secord or Florence Nightingale,...

Review by Christopher Hanna


Book Review

Pioneers of the Pacific Coast: A Chronicle of Sea Rovers and Fur Hunters

Until the later decades of the past century, historical writing was by men, about men, and for men. Narratives of the past made room for a queen, and the odd Laura Secord or Florence Nightingale,...

Review by Chad Reimer


Book Review

The Elusive West and the Contest for Empire, 1713-1763

If I understand the author’s intentions, the aim of this work is to explain how the west – that is, the continental interior of North America south of Hudson Bay, beyond the Great Lakes, and...

Review by Barry Gough


Book Review

The Private Journal of Captain G. H. Richards: The Vancouver Island Survey (1860-1862)

Captain (later Admiral Sir) George Henry Richards, Royal Navy, is one of the great personages of that unique era in modern history known as Pax Britannica – a period when “Britain Ruled the Waves,” and sometimes, as...

Review by Barry Gough


Book Review

The Legendary Betty Frank: The Cariboo’s Alpine Queen

As a young girl, Betty Cox (Frank) had some very non-traditional ideas of what she wanted to be when she grew up. She dreamed of riding horses, mushing dogs, and guiding hunters in the northern...

Review by Judy Campbell


Book Review

Imagining British Columbia: Land, Memory & Place

Imagining British Columbia: Land, Memory and Place, edited by Daniel Francis, is a collection of twenty creative non-fiction essays contributed by members of the Federation of British Columbia Writers. The federation invited writers to submit...

Review by Jenny Clayton


Book Review

From Victoria to Vladivostok: Canada’s Siberian Expedition, 1917-1919

  While the sixtieth anniversary of the Korean War unfolds with little or no fanfare, it is appropriate to consider an even more forgotten Canadian military adventure: the Canadian Siberian Expedition to the Russian port...

Review by Chris Leach


Book Review

The Power of Place, the Problem of Time: Aboriginal Identity and Historical Consciousness in the Cauldron of Colonialism

Keith Thor Carlson’s book focuses on the relationship between history and identity among the Stó:lō people of the Lower Fraser River between 1780 and 1906. He examines specific events and broad trends to demonstrate how...

Review by Madeline Knickerbocker


Book Review

Urbanizing Frontiers: Indigenous Peoples and Settlers in 19th-Century Pacific Rim Cities

    Colonists seldom embarked alone to new continents, and so the act of “settling” was often the act of creating a “settlement.” Penelope Edmonds’s Urbanizing Frontiers reminds us that the interface between settler and...

Review by John Lutz


Book Review

Forestry and Biodiversity: Learning How to Sustain Biodiversity in Managed Forests

 “No more clear-cuts!” So announced MacMillan Bloedel CEO Tom Stephens in a dramatic 1998 policy shift. The gap between global social expectations and the firm’s perceived destructive logging practices, primarily the accusation that it over-harvested pristine...

Review by David Brownstein