We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (11)

Review

City of Love and Revolution: Vancouver in the Sixties

Lawrence Aronsen’s handsomely-illustrated City of Love and Revolution examines a period of Vancouver’s history that still resonates. The latest contribution to a growing literature on the Sixties in Canada, the book also contributes to contemporary...

Review by Matt Cavers


Review

The Slow Farm

A memoir, The Slow Farm, focuses largely on the brief period during which Tarn Wilson lived on Texada Island with her American parents and younger sister Rima. Arriving in 1973, the then four-year-old and her...

Review by Connie Brim


Review

All Roads Lead to Wells: Stories of the Hippie Days

The growing literature about hippies demonstrates that the phenomenon was anything but uniform. Joy Inglis, in a privately printed book, describes one manifestation: a commune on Quadra Island that was established in 1968 by Antioch...

Review by David Stouck


Review

Accidental Eden: Hippie Days on Lasqueti Island

A friend said recently that he didn’t think much of the new generation of histories about British Columbia’s “back-to-the-landers” in the 1960s and seventies. Because if you weren’t there, then the stories just don’t mean...

Review by Howard Stewart


Review

One Native Life

For much of his life, Richard Wagamese has searched for a sense of belonging and struggled to find his identity as an indigenous person living in Canada. In One Native Life, Wagamese shares an intimate...

Review by Sean Carleton


Review

Long Beach Wild: A Celebration of People and Place on Canada’s Rugged Western Shore

Long Beach Wild is the kind of book that academics are often quick to dismiss. It’s popular history, after all (academics, of course, preferring unpopular histories), by a freelance writer whose many previous works include...

Review by Philip Van Huizen


Review

Welcome to Resisterville: American Dissidents in British Columbia

Just about every kid who grew up in British Columbia in the 1980s had a friend (or a friend of a friend) whose parents were American immigrants. Their parents usually arrived in the province sometime...

Review by Sean Kheraj


Review

Clearcut Cause

STRUGGLES OVER THE use of British Columbia’s natural resources are a ubiquitous feature of the province’s historical landscape. How we should manage our lumber, fisheries, water, and minerals —and who should manage them – mark...

Review by Michael Egan