We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (10)

Review

The Manly Modern: Masculinity in Postwar Canada

Theorists of modernity have often been particularly blind to the roles of gender. In numerous otherwise thought-provoking theoretical works on modernity, gender either disappears from the analysis or is treated awkwardly. Historians, to a degree,...

Review by Jarrett Rudy


Review

Policing the Fringe: The Curious Life of a Small-Town Mountie

Every province and state seems to have spawned its own popular literature about those who enforce the law and those who run afoul of it. British Columbia is no exception, but most popular histories of...

Review by Ben Bradley


Review

Canadian Pacific: The Golden Age of Travel

The Canadian Pacific Railway’s travel literature boasts marvellous scenery, adventure, and extravagance. “You shall see mighty rivers, vast forest, boundless plains, stupendous mountains and wonders innumerable, and you shall see in all in comfort, nay...

Review by Heather Longworth Sjoblom


Review

Starbuck Valley Winter

YOU WON’T FIND many kids like Don Morgan these days. The plucky protagonist of this reissued children’s novel is a sixteen-year-old who hunts avidly, builds a waterwheel-driven pump to supply the farmhouse with water, and dreams of...

Review by Arn Keeling


Review

Regulating Eden: The Nature of Order in North American Parks

IN “YELLOWSTONE AT 125,” the new preface to his classic National Parks: The American Experience (1997), Alfred Runte despairs that Yellowstone’s function as a “sanctuary” has been shattered by “a million cars and the drone...

Review by James Murton


Review

Writing the Okanagan

George Bowering’s new anthology, Writing the Okanagan, is a collection of Bowering’s fiction associated through setting, choice of characters, or autobiographical referents, with the Okanagan, chiefly the South Okanagan, where he grew up. Many of...

Review by Ian Pooley


Review

Beyond Mile Zero: The Vanishing Alaska Highway Lodge Community

The Alaska Highway runs from Dawson Creek, British Columbia, to Delta Junction, Alaska. Built by the American military for defense purposes during the Second World War, it was opened to the public in 1948 and...

Review by Steve Penfold