We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (430)

Book Review

Victoria Unbuttoned: A Red-Light History of BC’s Capital City

Linda J. Eversole’s first book, Stella: Unrepentant Madam, written in 2005, was praised for its academic value and readability. The author continues her exploration of women in the sex trade with Victoria Unbuttoned, profiling ten...

Review by Janet Nicol


Book Review

Go Do Some Great Thing: The Black Pioneers of British Columbia

The revised third edition of Kilian Crawford’s ground-breaking book on BC’s Black pioneers is timely and essential reading. It is a critical corrective to omissions and erasure in both academic histories and in popular understandings,...

Review by Georgia Sitara


Book Review

Civilian Internment in Canada: Histories and Legacies

“There is no single historiography of internment” in Canada, write Rhonda L. Hinter and Jim Mochoruk in the introduction of this ambitious collection of essays (9-10). Siloed histories of particular internments, they suggest, convey episodic...

Review by Jordan Stanger-Ross


Book Review

Unmooring The Komagata Maru: Charting Colonial Trajectories

From food (Valenze, 2012) to crops (Ali 2020, Rappaport 2019) to commodities (Curry-Machado, 2013) to digital cultures (Punathambekar and Mohan, 2019) and to empires (Bayly, 2003; Hopkins, 2003) there has been a steady scholarly commitment to...

Review by Dharitri Bhattacharjee


Book Review

Entering Time: The Fungus Man Platters of Charles Edenshaw

In 2013 the Vancouver Art Gallery’s Charles Edenshaw exhibition brought together three argillite platters made in the late 1880s by Da.a. xiigang, Charles Edenshaw – one from the Field Museum in Chicago, one from the...

Review by Martha Black


Book Review

At the Wilderness Edge: The Rise of the Antidevelopment Movement on Canada’s West Coast

In recent years, local opposition to the expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline in BC has confounded the plans of oil investors and federal officials alike. The government of Alberta has declared its right to...

Review by Jason M. Colby


Book Review

Rain City: Vancouver Reflections

John Moore is a BC-based free-lance journalist and author. Original versions of the sixteen essays that make up this volume have appeared in a variety of newspapers and periodicals over several decades. Some have won...

Review by John Belec


Book Review

“Opposition on the Coast”: The Hudson’s Bay Company, American Coasters, the Russian American Company, and Native Traders on the Northwest Coast, 1825-1846

Jim Gibson has assembled a collection of primary sources: 27 documents from Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) archives, British Columbia provincial archives, and microfilm of Russian-American Company (RAC) records from the US National Archives. A significant...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

New Ground: A Memoir of Art and Activism in BC’s Interior

New Ground: A Memoir of Art and Activism in BC’s Interior is more than just a memoir about Ann Kujundzic’s life — it is a beautifully crafted encounter with Kujundzic and all of the histories that...

Review by Alifa Zafirah Bandali


Book Review

Nothing to Write Home About: British Family Correspondence and the Settler Everyday in British Columbia

The history of colonial British Columbia is, in many respects, well-trodden ground. Over the past few decades, scholars like Jean Barman, Cole Harris, and Adele Perry have made multiple transformative contributions to our understanding of...

Review by Kristine Alexander


Book Review

The Co-op Revolution: Vancouver’s Search for Food

When growers, producers and practitioners self-organize around shared interests in the local foods economy, their social and economic actions—whether through a farmer’s market, buying co-op or the production of local food—can feel tenuous on the...

Review by Diandra Oliver


Book Review

Vancouverism

It’s best to start any study with a clear, concise, and irrefutable sentence. But “Vancouver is a place” is taking that axiom too far. And, as anyone who knows horses will tell you, a place...

Review by John Douglas Belshaw


Book Review

Working Towards Equity: Disability Rights Activism and Employment in Late Twentieth-Century Canada

Working Towards Equity examines the intersection of the contested nature of disability movements and activism and decision maker actions related to labour market activity in late 20thcentury Canada. Galer’s argument is that advances in labour...

Review by Mario Levesque


Book Review

Outside In: A Political Memoir

Outside In can be read and enjoyed as a straightforward memoir of Libby Davies’ remarkable career as an activist and elected official.  It traces her path from her early days working for housing justice in Vancouver’s...

Review by Gord Perks


Book Review

The Hundred-Year Trek: A History of Student Life at UBC

To borrow an old joke, institutional histories can often be the sofa beds of historical writing. Neither good as a sofa nor as a bed, institutional histories can often find themselves trapped between academic and...

Review by Dale M. McCartney


Book Review

Assembling Unity: Indigenous Politics, Gender and the Union of BC Indian Chiefs

Sarah Nickel’s Assembling Unity: Indigenous Politics, Gender and the Union of BC Indian Chiefs is a significant contribution, not only to the history of Indigenous affairs in British Columbia, but to Indigenous history as a...

Review by Mercedes Peters


Book Review

The Last Suffragist Standing: The Life and Times of Laura Marshall Jamieson

Veronica Strong-Boag is one of Canada’s most distinguished women’s historians.  One of the major themes of her publishing career has been Canadian women’s struggle for the vote. Strong-Boag’s expertise in the field is very much...

Review by Lynne Marks


Book Review

Children of the Kootenays: Memories of Mining Towns

Shirley D. Stainton’s Children of the Kootenays: Memories of Mining Towns describes her own and her brother Ray’s childhoods in West Kootenay mining communities during the 1930s and 1940s. Stainton’s father, Lee Hall, was a cook...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

Suffer the Little Children: Genocide, Indigenous Nations and the Canadian State

Tamara Starblanket is a Nehiyaw (Cree) legal scholar from Ahthakakoop First Nation and is currently the Dean of Academics at the Native Education College in Vancouver, which is located on the traditional territories of the...

Review by Carling Beninger