We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (293)

Book Review

Building Community in an Instant Town: A Social Geography of Mackenzie and Tumbler Ridge, British Columbia

BRITISH COLUMBIA’S single-industry communities that lie outside the province’s heartland of the Lower Mainland and southern Vancouver Island have experienced a dreadful pummelling over the last quarter century. Because of technological change, alterations in labour...

Review by Trevor Barnes


Book Review

Building the West: Early Architects of British Columbia

OUR KNOWLEDGE of the history of architecture in British Columbia has taken a quantum leap forward with the publication of Building the West. This remarkable reference work is a collaborative effort involving no fewer than...

Review by Harold Kalman


Book Review

The Comox Valley: Courtnay, Comox, Cumberland, and Area

In the publisher’s promotional sheet, this attractive book is described as “an intimate portrait of an incredibly beautiful and special place.” This sense of affection for the region comes across strongly in the course of...

Review by Jamie Morton


Book Review

Harbour City: Nanaimo in Transition, 1920-1967

Nanaimo is a perplexing place for a historian. The city’s elected officials and first Nations leaders often disregard and frequently disdain historical structures. Recently, two buildings that had been listed on the city’s heritage register...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Book Review

Royal City: A Photographic History of New Westminster, 1858-1960

Today, many residents of the Lower Mainland know New Westminster only as the site of traffic jams as they wait to get on to the Pattullo, the Queensborough, and Alex Fraser bridges; Highway 401; or...

Review by Patricia Roy


Book Review

Stan Douglas: Every Building on 100 West Hastings

EVERY BUILDING on 100 West Hastings is a panorama by Vancouver’s acclaimed film and video artist Stan Douglas. Without exaggeration, it is a marvellous and monumental photograph of the façade of buildings across the street...

Review by Jill Wade


Book Review

Launching History: The Saga of Burrard Dry Dock

IN 1894, ON THE SHORES of False Creek, Alfred “Andy” Wallace began what would become the largest shipbuilding conglomerate on the West Coast of Canada. Specializing in wooden fishing boats, Wallace soon diversified into wooden...

Review by Andrew Hildred


Book Review

Too Small to See, Too Big to Ignore: Child Health and Well-being

AS THE MOST RECENT Statistics Canada reports tell us, poverty continues to stalk British Columbia’s youngest citizens. Their distress, with outcomes measured pitilessly in shortfalls in nutrition, education, and health, is directly associated with the...

Review by Veronica Strong-Boag


Book Review

The First Russian Voyage Around the World: The Journal of Hermann Ludwig von Lowenstern (1803-1806)

THE RUSSIAN VOYAGE around the world (1803-06) recounted in this journal by the fourth officer and cartographer of the expedition’s flagship, the Nadezhda (Hope), is noteworthy on several counts. It was the country’s maiden circumnavigation...

Review by James Gibson


Book Review

Steel Rails and Iron Men: A Pictorial History of the Kettle Valley Railway

THE DECISION of Whitecap Books to publish the first paperback edition of Steel Rails &Iron Men is appropriate and timely. Since this book appeared in cloth in 1990, the Kettle Valley Railway (the KV) has...

Review by Duane Thomson


Book Review

Sutebusuton: A Japanese Village on the British Columbia Coast

MITSUO YESAKI was born in Steveston, known to its early Japanese-Canadian residents as Sutebusuton. He spent his early childhood there until the expulsion of Japanese Canadians from the West Coast in 1942. He is a...

Review by Ann Dore


Book Review

American Workers, Colonial Power: Philippine Seattle and the Transpacific West, 1919-1941

THIS IS AN AMBITIOUS bookthat aims to “recontextualize, if not challenge” (9) several standard historical narratives: of the American West, of Asian American settlement, and of Filipino experiences in the United States in the early...

Review by Geraldine Pratt


Book Review

Sojourning Sisters: The Lives and Letters of Jessie and Annie McQueen

JEAN BARMAN’S Soujourning Sisters is an important book that merits a wide audience, consisting of both those interested specifically in British Columbia and those interested in Canadian history writ large. It recasts the notion of...

Review by Suzanne Morton


Book Review

Fish versus Power: An Environmental History of the Fraser River

IN CIRCLES WHERE SALMON management gets debated, the Fraser River looms large because it helps drive a neat syllogism, which goes something like this: Columbia River runs imploded because American scientists supported a massive dam-building...

Review by Joseph Taylor


Book Review

Unsettled Pasts: Reconceiving the West through Women’s History

A primary goal of feminist scholarship and activism is to interrupt assumed notions about gender and to intervene in the naturalization of processes that perpetuate women’s op pression and subordination in patri archal societies. Contemporary...

Review by Patricia Barkaskas


Book Review

Nikkei in the Pacific Northwest: Japanese Americans and Japanese Canadians in the Twentieth Century

This long-awaited book emerged from a May 2000 conference entitled “The Nikkei Experiences in the Pacific Northwest.” The conference was organized by the Department of History at the University of Washington (UW) in conjunction with...

Review by Yuko Shibata


Book Review

Homefront and Battlefront: Nelson BC in World War II

When author Sylvia Crooks was a three-year-old growing up in Nelson, a young man named Maurice Latornell taught her how to skate. In 1944, Latornell died during a bombing mission over Berlin. For Crooks, Latornell’s...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

Philip Timm’s Vancouver: 1900-1910

I first met Fred Thirkell in the late 1970s when I ran an antique store in North Vancouver. Fred was a postcard collector, and we played the familiar dance between buyer and seller in the...

Review by Robin Anderson


Book Review

The Letters of Margaret Butcher: Missionary-Imperialism on the North Pacific Coast

As a study of missionary imperialism, Mary-Ellen Kelm’s edition of the letters Margaret Butcher wrote from Kitamaat between 1916 and 1919 makes an important contribution to historical conversations about the Haisla, missionaries, and residential schools...

Review by Jacqueline Gresko


Book Review

The Seattle Bungalow: People and Houses, 1900-1940

As Janet Ore says in the preface to this book, she seeks to overturn many assumptions associated with the bungalow. First, she wishes to reexamine the universality of its Arts and Crafts credentials and assumed...

Review by Sherry McKay


Book Review

Phantom Limb

A phantom limb is an amputated arm or leg that feels like it hasn’t gone anywhere. At the end of a phantom arm, for instance, the fingers of a phantom hand still feel heat, the touch...

Review by Harold Rhenisch


Book Review

The Land of Heart’s Delight: Early Maps and Charts of Vancouver Island

As a subject for cartography and historical geography, Vancouver Island has many attractions. Islands are uniquely advantaged in this regard, bordered as they are by waters and seas. The Enlightenment demanded scientific designations and definitions...

Review by Barry Gough


Book Review

Madness, Betrayal and the Lash: The Epic Voyage of Captain George Vancouver

Madness, Betrayal and the Lash is an accessible, succinct narrative of George Vancouver’s life, focusing on the voyage he led into the Pacific in the late 18th century. Bown’s stated goal is to give Vancouver...

Review by Brian Richardson


Book Review

A Silent Revolution? Gender and Wealth in English Canada, 1860-1930

A Silent Revolution? is a fascinating study of female capitalists in Victoria and Hamilton at the turn of the twentieth century.  Peter Baskerville employs both quantitative and qualitative methods to establish that women were willing...

Review by Judith Fingard