We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (167)

Book Review

Policing the Fringe: The Curious Life of a Small-Town Mountie

Every province and state seems to have spawned its own popular literature about those who enforce the law and those who run afoul of it. British Columbia is no exception, but most popular histories of...

Review by Ben Bradley


Book Review

Canada’s Rights Revolution, Social Movements and Social Change

I am not as confident as is Dominique Clément that “the vast majority of Canadians instinctively see human rights as an inherent good” (9). It might be true that most of us value civil liberties, at...

Review by Shirley Tillotson


Book Review

The Archive of Place: Unearthing the Pasts of the Chilcotin Plateau

William Turkel grew up in central British Columbia; studied linguistics and psychology before undertaking doctoral studies in history, anthropology, and the Science, Technology and Society Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and now teaches...

Review by Cole Harris


Book Review

Waste Heritage

The protagonist of Irene Baird’s Depression-era novel Waste Heritage is Matt Striker, a twenty-three-year-old transient from Saskatchewan. A veteran of the Regina Riot in 1935, which ended the On-to-Ottawa trek, Matt arrives in Vancouver by...

Review by Andrew Parnaby


Book Review

Red Light Neon: A History of Vancouver’s Sex Trade

Prostitution is a complex and politically charged issue that defies simple analysis. Daniel Francis’s new book documents attempts to regulate the sex industry in Vancouver, a city where the subject has occupied a central place...

Review by Dara Culhane


Book Review

Myra’s Men: Building the Kettle Valley Railway, Myra Canyon to Penticton

In August 2003, the Okanagan Mountain Park fire southeast of Kelowna destroyed or damaged the Myra Canyon trestles, eighteen railroad structures, and the roadbed between them. This 5.5-mile (8.9-km) elevated path around a mountainous amphitheatre...

Review by Frank Leonard


Book Review

Negotiating Buck Naked: Doukhobors, Public Policy, and Conflict Resolution

No one knows better than Gregory Cran the sometimes baffling intricacies of the relationship among the various groups of Doukhobors and between them and the mainstream community in British Columbia. Between 1979 and 1987, he...

Review by Larry Hannant


Book Review

Stella: Unrepentant Madam

Linda Eversole’s biography of Victoria madam Stella Carroll (1872-1946) is listed on the book cover as fitting into two genres: “creative non-fiction” and “history.” It’s an interesting division for an interesting book. Having spent more...

Review by Jenea Tallentire


Book Review

Radical Campus: Making Simon Fraser University

When Simon Fraser University (SFU) opened in the fall of 1965, the registrar locked himself in his office and refused to answer the phone. A group of department heads, who later entered the office, found...

Review by James Pitsula


Book Review

Wartime Images, Peacetime Wounds: The Media and the Gustafsen Lake Standoff

A welcome addition to the literature on Aboriginal symbolic politics and direct action in Canada, this book describes the standoff between the rcmp and a handful of Native activists and supporters at Gustafsen Lake, British...

Review by Kenneth Brealey


Book Review

Book Review

Wires in the Wilderness: The Story of the Yukon Telegraph

IT WAS WITH SOME excitement and a little trepidation that I agreed to review Bill Miller’s book. First of all, my father, George Ball, was a Yukon Telegraph Line operator in the early years; and...

Review by Georgiana Ball


Book Review

Murdering Holiness: The Trials of Franz Creffield and George Mitchell

FEW BOOK JACKETS are as striking as the one that graces Jim Philips and Rosemary Gartner’s text. Bale-fully staring back at the viewer is a prison photograph of Franz Creffield, who bears an uncanny resemblance...

Review by Angus McLaren


Book Review

Dr. Fred and the Spanish Lady: Fighting the Killer Flu

As the title suggests, Dr. Fred and the Spanish Lady is an account of the 1918 influenza pandemic as it swept through Vancouver and ran into preparations made for it by the city’s first full-time...

Review by Mona Kaiser


Book Review

Rain Before Morning

In the spring of 1913, sisters Leah and Elspeth Jamieson, seventeen and eighteen years old, respectively, travel on the Union Steamship Comox from Vancouver past Halfmoon Bay and Pender Harbour to their parents’ home at...

Review by Jocelyn Smith


Book Review

Negotiating Demands: The Politics of Skid Row Policing in Edinburgh, San Francisco and Vancouver

Negotiating Demands originates from Huey’s PhD dissertation of the same title completed at UBC in 2005 under the supervision of Dr. Richard Ericson, a professor of criminology and law. Unfortunately, due to the above fact,...

Review by Rick Clapton


Book Review

The Art of the Impossible: Dave Barrett and the NDP in Power, 1972-1975

This book is splendid work of popular political history, biography, and related media study that co-authors Geoff Meggs (a former communications director to Premier Glen Clark) and Rod Mickleburgh (a veteran of the west coast...

Review by Allen Seager


Book Review

Dalton’s Gold Rush Trail: Exploring the Route of the Klondike Cattle Drives

Although the Chilkoot Trail is the most famous trail to the Klondike, there were a wide variety of other routes that gold seekers used to reach the interior of the Yukon between 1896 and 1900....

Review by Charlene Porsild


Book Review

Raising the Workers’ Flag: The Workers’ Unity League in Canada, 1930-1936

The struggle to build trade unions in the extractive and manufacturing industries of Canada — mining, forestry, fishing, clothing, furniture, and others — was meteoric and its demise equally rapid. Raising the Workers’ Flag provides...

Review by Ron Verzuh


Book Review

Making Headlines: 100 Years of the Vancouver Sun

The Vancouver Sun turned one hundred in 2012. To mark this event, reporter Shelley Fralic compiled a (roughly) chronological account of goings-on in the city and at the paper itself. It is not so much...

Review by John Belshaw