We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (152)

Book Review

Eating Dirt: Deep Forests, Big Timber and Life with the Tree-Planting Tribe

  Charlotte Gill, as many have already observed, has written an extraordinary book that will likely be the definitive tome about tree planting for some time to come. She has a gift for making the...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

Rewriting Marpole: The Path to Cultural Complexity in the Gulf of Georgia Region

         Rewriting Marpole is the published version of Clark’s PhD dissertation (Clark, 2010) and an outgrowth of his MA thesis (Clark, 2000). The goal of his research “is to determine the spatial...

Review by Jesse Morin


Book Review

Saanich Ethnobotany: Culturally Important Plants of the WSANEC People

In Saanich Ethnobotany, Nancy Turner and Richard Hebda describe the land and vegetation of W̱SÁNEĆ (Saanich), examine the “many interrelationships between people and plants” (11), and explore the traditional ecological knowledge that allowed local First...

Review by Andrew Cienski


Book Review

The Inverted Pyramid

In 2011, the Association of Book Publishers of British Columbia celebrated Vancouver’s 125th anniversary with the Vancouver Legacy Book Collection, reissuing ten books that it deemed best representative of British Columbia’s social and literary history....

Review by Sinead Earley


Book Review

The Left in British Columbia: A History of Struggle

Here is an indispensable book — a mature, well-researched, subtly theorized, and clearly-written guide to the past and present of British Columbia’s left. Writing at a time of perplexity for leftists, predisposed to question themselves...

Review by Ian McKay


Book Review

Echoes Across Seymour: A History of North Vancouver’s Eastern Communities Including Dollarton and Deep Cove

Janet Pavlik, Desmond Smith, and Eileen Smith have given us another chapter in the history of the Seymour area and North Vancouver’s eastern communities by recording the changes of the last sixty years. Written as...

Review by Jessica Hayes


Book Review

Accidental Eden: Hippie Days on Lasqueti Island

A friend said recently that he didn’t think much of the new generation of histories about British Columbia’s “back-to-the-landers” in the 1960s and seventies. Because if you weren’t there, then the stories just don’t mean...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

Ladysmith: Our Community, Your Credit Union — A History

Patrick Dunae’s microhistory, Ladysmith: Our Community, Your Credit Union — A History, is attractive and approachable, and a success at what intends to be: a proudly colourful and informative history of the Ladysmith Credit Union....

Review by Patrick Craib


Book Review

Stewards of the People’s Forests: A Short History of the British Columbia Forest Service

The forest industry was the most important economic activity in British Columbia during the twentieth century. Oddly, except for some consideration of its founding, there has not been a major examination of an institution at...

Review by Gordon Hak


Book Review

Milk Spills and One-Log Loads: Memories of a Pioneer Truck Driver

Milk Spills and One-Log Loads is the first of two autobiographical volumes relating the life of Frank White, one of the early fixtures of British Columbia’s independent trucking industry. Profanity and profundity are laid out...

Review by Patrick Craib


Book Review

Aboriginal Peoples and Forest Lands in Canada

Forests, long of economic and socio-cultural importance to both Aboriginal peoples and settlers in Canada, have also been sites of contention between these groups, reflected in blockades, court action, and state policies intended to address...

Review by Brian Egan


Book Review

Making Headlines: 100 Years of the Vancouver Sun

The Vancouver Sun turned one hundred in 2012. To mark this event, reporter Shelley Fralic compiled a (roughly) chronological account of goings-on in the city and at the paper itself. It is not so much...

Review by John Belshaw