We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (147)

Review

A Political Space: Reading the Global through Clayoquot Sound

Clayoquot Sound. Home of the Nu-Chah-Nuulth First Nation for thousands of years. Home of loggers and fishers who have contributed to a global market for wood and fish products for decades. Home to scenic fjords,...

Review by David Tindall


Review

The Gold Will Speak For Itself: Peter Leech and Leechtown

Vancouver Island has a distinctive personality among the regions of British Columbia, one that has been shaped in complex ways by geography and history. The books reviewed here vary in their candlepower, but all of...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Review

Climber’s Paradise: Making Canada’s Mountain Parks, 1906-1974

Two powerful and iconic institutions can be found at the centre of most histories of tourism and recreation in the mountains of western Canada: the Canadian Pacific Railway and the agency known today as Parks...

Review by Ben Bradley


Review

The Salmon People

When The Salmon People was first published in 1967, commercial salmon fishing still sustained many coastal communities, although as Hugh McKervill pointed out then, there were plenty of signs that the resource was threatened. In...

Review by Kenneth Campbell


Review

Flyover: British Columbia’s Cariboo Chilcotin Coast. An Aviation Legacy

In his latest publication, Chris Harris views the Cariboo, Chilcotin, and Coast region of south central British Columbia, the base for his numerous books, from a new perspective derived from a series of flights over...

Review by Jay Sherwood


Review

Islands’ Spirit Rising: Reclaiming the Forests of Haida Gwaii

In Islands’ Spirit Rising: Reclaiming the Forests of Haida Gwaii, Louise Takeda challenges the dominant epistemological perspective on the politics of BC resource management in order to “[further] political and social justice” and “give back”...

Review by James Davey


Review

Konelīne: our land beautiful

Winner of the Best Canadian Feature at the 2016 Hot Docs Festival, Nettie Wild’s Konelīne: our land beautiful weaves together stories of humanity’s relationships with industry, the wilderness, and nature in Northwestern British Columbia. Telling...

Review by Matthew Gartner


Review

The Sea Among Us: The Amazing Strait of Georgia

Much of my critique of Beamish and McFarlane’s The Sea Among Us is that familiar reviewer’s refrain: they didn’t write the book that I would have. With the luxury of a dozen different writers, I...

Review by Howard Stewart


Review

Now You’re Logging

Romance, high drama with runaway logging trucks (26-29), and dangerous river crossings of donkey engines (65-72) are all integral parts of this graphic portrayal of British Columbia’s coastal logging scene during the 1930s. Although Griffiths...

Review by Robert Griffin


Review

Memories of Jack Pickup: Flying Doctor of British Columbia

       Transportation and communication technologies have played an integral role in modernizing British Columbia by reconfiguring possibilities of movement and exchange. As Cole Harris has pointed out in The Resettlement of British Columbia (1997), the...

Review by Bret Edwards


Review

Beyond Mile Zero: The Vanishing Alaska Highway Lodge Community

The Alaska Highway runs from Dawson Creek, British Columbia, to Delta Junction, Alaska. Built by the American military for defense purposes during the Second World War, it was opened to the public in 1948 and...

Review by Steve Penfold


Review

Unbuilt Environments: Tracing Postwar Development in Northwest British Columbia

In 1921 the Prince George Citizen reminded its readership that “central B.C. is not a new country” (Prince George Citizen 1921). Defining “central B.C.” as those parts of the province situated between the 52nd and...

Review by Daniel Sims


Review

Citizen Docker: Making a New Deal on the Vancouver Waterfront 1919-1939

In Citizen Docker Andrew Parnaby explores industrial relations on the Vancouver waterfront during the interwar years. The analysis is linked to a broader consideration of the transition to the welfare state and the new industrial...

Review by Gordon Hak


Review

UBC: The First 100 Years

With its heavy glossy paper, large format, and copious illustrations, this looks like a celebratory coffee table book. To classify it as such would be wrong. Drawing on previous histories of the University of British...

Review by Patricia Roy


Review

The Cowichan Valley: Duncan, Chemainus, Ladysmtih and Region

We become travellers in our own land when we read Georgina Montgomery’s story and marvel at Kevin Oke’s photographs in The Cowichan Valley. The last word goes to Rick Pipes of Merridale Ciderworks, who comments:...

Review by David Thomas


Review

Native Peoples and Water Rights: Irrigation, Dams, and the Law in Western Canada

Making the jump from studies of static property such as land to the fluid resource of water, Kenichi Matsui’s Native Peoples and Water Rights explores new territory by examining the intersection of Aboriginal rights and...

Review by Jenny Clayton


Review

The Last Best West: An Exploration of Myth, Identity and Quality of Life in Western Canada

The Last Best West is an eclectic collection of chapters based loosely on the meaning and mythology of the advertising slogan used by the Canadian government around the turn of the twentieth century to attract...

Review by Ken Favrholdt


Review

Captain Alex MacLean: Jack London’s Sea Wolf

Anyone who has delved into the gripping, sometimes impregnable, but always complex world of pelagic fur sealing on the north Pacific Coast knows just what a challenge the history of that subject poses. Then, to...

Review by Cary Collins


Review

Writing the West Coast: In Love with Place

In the two generations since the first postmodern attempts to create a pan-cultural literature of place on the Pacific Coast, the context of landscape writing in British Columbia has been radically transformed. The environmental movement...

Review by Harold Rhenisch


Review

Geography of British Columbia: People and Landscapes in Transition 3rd Edition

I was intrigued by this textbook and agreed to review it for two reasons: first, because it is more than fifteen years since I lived in British Columbia and I was keen to discover how...

Review by Daniel Clayton


Review

The British Columbia Court of Appeal: The First Hundred Years, 1910-2010

A law court has an inner life, beyond the many outside lives that it can rescue, ruin, remedy and reward. When it is an appellate court, the urge to converge as group judgment replaces the...

Review by DeLloyd Guth


Review

Why Canadian Forestry and Mining Towns are Organized Differently: The Role of Staples in Shaping Community, Class, and Consciousness

Canada’s single industry towns (SITs), especially resource towns, continue to be the focus of considerable academic and policy attention. Canada’s population may be highly urbanized, indeed urbane, with the major metropolitan and even medium-sized urban...

Review by Roger Hayter


Review

Making Headlines: 100 Years of the Vancouver Sun

The Vancouver Sun turned one hundred in 2012. To mark this event, reporter Shelley Fralic compiled a (roughly) chronological account of goings-on in the city and at the paper itself. It is not so much...

Review by John Belshaw