We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (541)

Book Review

A Modern Life: Art and Design in British Columbia, 1945-1960

An early and still not inappropriate epithet for Vancouver is Terminal City. This epithet denotes not only a peripheral cultural as well as a geographical location but also the city’s potential for development, despite its...

Review by Rhodri Windsor-Liscombe


Book Review

Songhees Pictorial: A History of the Songhees People as Seen by Outsiders, 1790-1912

This is a wonderful addition to the history of Aboriginal peoples in British Columbia and Canada. It is unusual because it takes images as the starting point and valuable because the people upon whom it...

Review by John Lutz


Book Review

The Secret Voyage of Sir Francis Drake, 1577-1580

This book represents an expanded form of the much debated revelations of Samuel Bawlf concerning the Pacific Ocean explorations of Francis Drake during his 1577–80 voyage of circumnavigation. Parts of the voyage account are well known,...

Review by Christon Archer


Book Review

The Nature of Gold: An Environmental History of the Klondike Gold Rush

THE NATURE OF GOLD is in several ways a path-breaking work since, although there is a large literature on Yukon environment, there has been very little written on the environmental history of the Territory, and...

Review by William Morrison


Book Review

Oregon’s Promise: An Interpretive History

WHY SHOULD BC Studies review a history of the State of Oregon, situated in another country and some 300 kilometres to the south? For many reasons. Our province and Oregon lie in a single economic-environmental...

Review by Roderick Barman


Book Review

The Whaling Indians: Legendary Hunters

THE INTENT OF The Whaling Indians: Legendary Hunters is to present the “Native point of view” and so that will also be the perspective of this book review. On the surface of things, the method...

Review by Umeek Atleo


Book Review

Framing the West: Race, Gender, and the Photographic Frontier in the Pacific Northwest

PHOTOGRAPHS OCCUPY a paradoxical place in our historical imagination. As Carol J. Williams notes in the introduction to Framing the West: Race, Gender, and the Photographic Frontier in the Pacific Northwest, contemporary historians have primarily...

Review by Kim Greenwell


Book Review

McGowan’s War: The Birth of Modern British Columbia on the Fraser River Gold Fields

IN 1858 TENS OF thousands of non-Native goldseekers rushed to the Fraser River in search of gold, a substantial number of them being American citizens who paid little heed to British sovereignty in the region....

Review by Daniel Marshall


Book Review

A Voyage to the North West Side of America: The Journals of James Colnett, 1786-89

JAMES COLNETT will always remain a name of notoriety in world history for it is he who responded to Commandant Esteban Martinez’s demands and formalities at Nootka Sound in 1789 and started, so it is...

Review by Barry Gough


Book Review

When Coal Was King: Ladysmith in the Coal-Mining Industry on Vancouver Island

WHEN COAL WAS KING, Ladysmith was a small, undistinguished pit-town, one of thousands around the industrializingworld. On the eve of the Great War, Ladysmith’s population barely passed 3,200. Compared with Nanaimo or Cumberland, let alone...

Review by John Belshaw


Book Review

Invisible Indigenes: The Politics of Non-recognition

A TEXT THAT PURPORTS to examine the experiences of indigenous peoples on a global scale is by definition ambitious and, thus, open to a variety of critiques. These works tend to sacrifice detailed analysis in favour...

Review by Alexander Dawson


Book Review

The Comox Valley: Courtnay, Comox, Cumberland, and Area

In the publisher’s promotional sheet, this attractive book is described as “an intimate portrait of an incredibly beautiful and special place.” This sense of affection for the region comes across strongly in the course of...

Review by Jamie Morton


Book Review

Native Seattle: Histories from the Crossing-Over Place

Coll Thrush’s book lies at the intersection of two bodies of scholarship that usually run parallel to each other. Urban history and Indian history meet in Native Seattle with panache and authority. Thrush tracks the...

Review by Jean Barman


Book Review

The Mapmaker’s Eye: Douglas Thompson on the Columbia Plateau

More than an exhibition catalogue but every bit that as well, Jack Nisbet’s Mapmaker’s Eye takes its reader farther into Anglo-Welsh-Canadian explorer David Thompson’s five years (1808-12) on the Pacific Slope than has any previous...

Review by I.S. MacLaren


Book Review

From the Baltic to Russian America, 1829-1836

ALIX O’GRADY’S From the Baltic to Russian America, 1829-1836 should be of interest to BC historians concerned with the broader aspects of the Pacific Slopes fur trade in general and of Russian colonial history in particular. O’Grady,...

Review by Bruce Watson


Book Review

Pioneer Photographers of the Far West: A Biographical

PIONEER PHOTOGRAPHERS of the Far West is the finest reference work I have ever read, with the emphasis on read. The clear, precise, mainly biographical entries – some 1,100 of them arranged in alphabetical order -are...

Review by Brian Dippie


Book Review

Launching History: The Saga of Burrard Dry Dock

IN 1894, ON THE SHORES of False Creek, Alfred “Andy” Wallace began what would become the largest shipbuilding conglomerate on the West Coast of Canada. Specializing in wooden fishing boats, Wallace soon diversified into wooden...

Review by Andrew Hildred


Book Review

Tales of Ghosts: First Nations Art in British Columbia, 1922-61

THE HISTORIOGRAPHIC trends in the scholarly literature pertaining to First Nations material and visual culture have leaned primarily towards stylistic analysis, connoisseurship, and tracing the rise, decline, and “renaissance” of this production. Ronald Hawker’s book,...

Review by Megan Smetzer


Book Review

The Intemperate Rainforest: Nature, Culture and Power on

WHAT IS IT THAT MAKES dancers yearn to sing or painters to write? Why are academics fundamentally unhappy within their disciplines? Inside each academician there seems to be an alter ego struggling to get out....

Review by H.V. Nelles


Book Review

The Heavens are Changing: Nineteenth-Century Protestant Missions and Tsimshian Christianity

WRITING IN Moon of Wintertime: Missionaries and the Indians of Canada in Encounter since 1534 (University of Toronto Press, 1984, 250) of seventeenth-century Jesuit missions to the Huron, John Webster Grant quoted a Huron man...

Review by J.R. Miller


Book Review

Masterworks of the Classical Haida Mythtellers

THE IDEA OF a story being as sharp as a knife, which is the title of Robert Bringhurst’s astonishing introduction to the works of classical Haida poets, is a useful proposition to consider in order...

Review by Terry Glavin