We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (402)

Book Review

A Hard Man to Beat: The Story of Bill White, Labour Leader, Historian, Shipyard Worker, Raconteur

Selected as one of ten Vancouver books reprinted to celebrate the city’s 125th anniversary, A Hard Man to Beat is perhaps even more important now than when it was first published. Then, Bill White’s lively...

Review by Mark Leier


Book Review

Selling Canada: Three Propaganda Campaigns that Shaped the Nation

In his latest project Daniel Francis takes on a series of publicity campaigns, running from the 1870s through to 1940: immigration to western Canada, the First World War, and the promotion of tourism from the...

Review by Doug Owram


Book Review

Early in the Season: A British Columbia Journal

In the summer of 1968, aspiring American novelist Edward Hoagland spent seven weeks in the BC bush, interviewing locals, listening to stories, exploring highways and byways, and chronicling his experiences. He was gathering material for...

Review by Jonathan Peyton


Book Review

V6A: Writing from Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside

V6A is a postal code prefix in Vancouver. It is, thus, an artificial geographical space defined by a bureaucracy housed far from V6A itself. It runs from Burrard Inlet south to False Creek and Great...

Review by John Belshaw


Book Review

Retail Nation: Department Stores and the Making of Modern Canada

Retail Nation is a thought-provoking study of the intersection between a rapidly growing consumer economy and the formation of culture and identity in Canada between 1890 and 1940. During this period, argues Donica Belisle, department...

Review by Nicolas Kenny


Book Review

Contesting White Supremacy: School Segregation, Anti-Racism, and the Making of Chinese Canadians

In September 1922, the Victoria, B.C. school board ordered 155 Chinese children (97 were Canadian-born and many spoke only English) to leave its regular elementary schools and move to segregated schools which only they would...

Review by Patricia Roy


Book Review

Speaking for a Long Time: Public Space and Social Memory in Vancouver

  Mike Davis claims that ours is a time when the lived geographies of privilege and marginality intersect with an ever-diminishing regularity [1]. If he is right, then critical urban research that attempts to understand how new...

Review by David Hugill


Book Review

Vancouver Special

In Vancouver Special Charles Demers presents a unique portrait of his hometown of Vancouver, where he continues to live and work as a writer and a comedian. In a series of essays that explore the...

Review by Robert McDonald


Book Review

Colonial Proximities: Crossracial Encounters and Juridical Truths in British Columbia, 1871-1921

Colonial Proximities is a good book about an important subject: how colonial authorities, anxious about racial difference, tried to use legal and other strategies to regulate and restrict interracial “encounters” during the half-century after confederation...

Review by Hamar Foster


Book Review

From Victoria to Vladivostok: Canada’s Siberian Expedition, 1917-1919

  While the sixtieth anniversary of the Korean War unfolds with little or no fanfare, it is appropriate to consider an even more forgotten Canadian military adventure: the Canadian Siberian Expedition to the Russian port...

Review by Chris Leach


Book Review

Never Shoot a Stampede Queen: A Rookie Reporter in the Cariboo

Never Shoot a Stampede Queen tells the story of a twenty-two-year-old university graduate from Vancouver adapting to life in Williams Lake in the 1980s after he accidentally landed a job there as a community newspaper...

Review by Jenny Clayton


Book Review

Spirit in the Grass: The Cariboo Chilcotin’s Forgotten Landscape

It is said that, in the old days, you could hear the commotion at Becher’s place as soon as your horse crested the rim of the Prairie. The old stopping house and saloon are gone...

Review by Marie Elliott


Book Review

The Man Who Saved Vancouver: Major James Skitt Matthews

The publication of Daphne Sleigh’s biography of James Matthews coincides with the seventy-fifth anniversary of the City of Vancouver Archives, which he founded. The work is remarkable for being the first book-length biography of a...

Review by Terry Eastwood


Book Review

The British Columbia Atlas of Wellness

Maps and atlases have acquired a mystique in the lore of public health since the publication of Dr. John Snow’s famous cholera map of London in the mid-nineteenth century. Somewhere along the way, a notion...

Review by Neil Hanlon


Book Review

Waste Heritage

The protagonist of Irene Baird’s Depression-era novel Waste Heritage is Matt Striker, a twenty-three-year-old transient from Saskatchewan. A veteran of the Regina Riot in 1935, which ended the On-to-Ottawa trek, Matt arrives in Vancouver by...

Review by Andrew Parnaby


Book Review

Liquid Gold: Energy Privatization in British Columbia

John Calvert is a professor of political science at Simon Fraser University, but this is not the kind of book one expects from an academic. It presents a conspiracy theory in which the sole purpose...

Review by Mark Jaccard


Book Review

Raincoast Chronicles Fourth Five

The sinking of the BC Ferries vessel Queen of the North on 22 March 2006 has brought the lives of British Columbia’s coastal residents into sharp and extraordinary focus. It is a safe bet that...

Review by Jocelyn Smith


Book Review

Danger, Death and Disaster in the Crowsnest Pass Mines, 1902-28

The Crowsnest Pass coal-mining communities serve as the backdrop for Karen Buckley’s study of danger, death, and disaster. Her objective is to examine personal and community responses to death and to “gain a clearer understanding...

Review by Andrew Yarmie


Book Review

The Importance of Being Monogamous: Marriage and Nation Building in Western Canada to 1915

This sophisticated and engaging book has much to offer a number of scholarly areas, including Canadian history, gender studies, and political and legal studies. Working from a massive bedrock of diverse primary materials, Sarah Carter...

Review by Katie Pickles


Book Review

Interventions: Native American Art for Far-flung Territories

  Judith Ostrowitz skilfully investigates the complex and innovative strategies used by First Nations artists since the 1950s to engage with museum, art gallery, restoration, and tourist initiatives. She shows how various individuals and groups...

Review by Leslie Dawn


Book Review

The Forgotten Explorer: Samuel Prescott Fay’s 1914 Expedition to the Northern Rockies

  In 1914, Samuel Prescott Fay (1884- 1971), a Harvard graduate from Boston, ventured twelve hundred kilometres through the northern Rockies from Jasper to Hudson’s Hope. While the Harvard Travelers Club deferred exploration in the...

Review by PearlAnn Reichwein


Book Review

Atlas of Pacific Salmon

Journalist Timothy Egan once wrote that the Pacific Northwest “is wherever the salmon can get to.” As woefully provincial as he was, Egan unwittingly revealed the absence of an alternative way to regionalize the seven...

Review by Joseph Taylor