We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (450)

Book Review

Civilizing the Wilderness: Culture and Nature in Pre-Confederation Canada and Rupert’s Land

  Newcomers to Canada and Rupert’s Land in the mid-nineteenth century brought with them an assortment of cultural baggage. A. A. den Otter reveals that the twinned concepts of “civilization” and “wilderness” formed the dominant...

Review by Jonathan Clapperton


Book Review

A Wilder West: Rodeo in Western Canada

This is a book about people in small towns in the west, and the rodeos that have provided ways to negotiate their complex social, economic, and cultural relationships with each other and with the animals...

Review by J. Chamberlin


Book Review

“We are Still Didene”: Stories of Hunting and History from Northern British Columbia

We read this book as the British Columbia government announced that oil and gas development will be banned in the “Sacred Headwaters,” the vast tract of land in North Central British Columbia where the Nass,...

Review by Jillian Ridington


Book Review

Trucking in British Columbia: An Illustrated History

Historians of British Columbia have devoted considerable attention to how its economy and social geography were shaped by different kinds of transportation, from sailing vessels and trails to wagon roads and railways. However, automobiles and...

Review by Ben Bradley


Book Review

Epidemic Encounters: Influenza, Society, and Culture in Canada, 1918-20

Epidemics call out the ambulance-chaser in all of us, and for health historians, there is none more attention-grabbing than the 1918-20 influenza pandemic, mistakenly dubbed the “Spanish Flu,” the only infectious disease to stop the...

Review by Megan Davies


Book Review

Who Killed Janet Smith?

In late July 1924 in a house in the upper crust neighbourhood of Shaughnessy Heights, Vancouver, around midday, a Scots nursemaid was found dead in the basement by the Chinese “house boy,” Wing Fong Sing....

Review by John McLaren


Book Review

Nowhere Else on Earth: Standing Tall for the Great Bear Rainforest

The Great Bear Rainforest, also known as the North and Central Coast of British Columbia, is one of the last intact temperate rainforests left in the world. This region has received much attention since 1989,...

Review by Margaret (Maggie) Low


Book Review

People of the Middle Fraser Canyon: An Archaeological History

The authors, from the departments of anthropology at the University of Montana (Prentiss) and the University of Notre Dame (Kuijt), draw on their extensive and recent archaeological work in the interior of British Columbia to...

Review by Douglas Hudson


Book Review

Discovering Indigenous Lands: The Doctrine of Discovery in the English Colonies

This brilliant volume of comparative law is written by four distinguished Indigenous legal academic specialists, from the United States (Eastern Shawnee Tribe), New Zealand (Maori — Ngati Rawkawa and Ngati Ranginui), Australia (Eualayai/Gammilaroi), and Canada...

Review by Daniel Clayton


Book Review

British Columbia’s Inland Rainforest: Ecology, Conservation, and Management

“These two streams at the foot of the hills have formed a wide alluvial, on which are forest trees of enormous size; the white cedars were from fifteen to thirty six feet girth, clean grown...

Review by Andy MacKinnon


Book Review

The Sacred Headwaters: The Fight to Save the Stikine, Skeena and Nass

On 17 April 2012, Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver announced that his department would follow through on the Federal Conservative Party 2012 budget promise to “streamline” the Environmental Assessment process in Canada. The new process...

Review by Jonathan Peyton


Book Review

Return to Northern British Columbia: A Photojournal of Frank Swannell, 1929-39

This is the third and final instalment in Jay Sherwood’s series about the work of provincial land surveyor Frank Swannell. It describes Swannell’s activities during the 1930s, including several seasons spent in areas of northern...

Review by Ben Bradley


Book Review

Brian Jungen

The book provides an overview of the career of the artist Brian Jungen, consisting of essays by Daina Augaitis and four other notable curators — Cuauhtémoc Medina, Ralph Rugoff, Kitty Scott, and Trevor Smith. The...

Review by Geoffrey Carr


Book Review

Dim Sum Stories: A Chinatown Childhood

Vancouver’s Chinatown has been the subject of numerous notable academic studies, providing a focus that has proven to be essential to the Canadian historical narrative. In analyzing the history of Vancouver’s Chinatown, scholars have made...

Review by LiLynn Wan


Book Review

The Development of the Fraser River Salmon Canning Industry, 1885 to 1913

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 21, Spring 1974  

Review by Keith Ralston


Book Review

Resilience, Reciprocity and Ecological Economics: Northwest Coast Sustainability

In this brief and densely-packed treatise on why and how the aboriginal economy of the Northwest Coast worked so well, Ronald Trosper dives into the science fiction/fantasy territory: he re-imagines the clash of two competing...

Review by Jude Isabella


Book Review

Seeing Reds: The Red Scare of 1918-1919, Canada’s First War on Terror

In Seeing Reds: The Red Scare of 1918-1919, Canada’s First War on Terror, Daniel Francis provides an overview of the response of the Canadian state and elite to the postwar labour revolt. Although written for...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

Taking My Life

In 2008, when researching Canadian women authors, Linda Morra discovered an unpublished autobiography written by Jane Rule in the 1980s, just before her retirement from writing, in which she recounts with frankness and humour her...

Review by Cameron Duder


Book Review

Creative Subversions: Whiteness, Indigeneity, and the National Imaginary

In Creative Subversions, Margot Francis starts from the premise that some of the key images that inform Canadian national identity, such as the beaver, the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), national parks, and Indians are “public...

Review by Chris Herbert


Book Review

Nature’s Northwest: The North Pacific Slope in the Twentieth Century

In Nature’s Northwest, William G. Robbins and Katrine Barber have synthesized a wealth of scholarship on the Greater Northwest, encompassing Idaho, Oregon, Washington, western Montana, and southern British Columbia. The authors track social, economic, political,...

Review by Richard Rajala


Book Review

Caring and Compassion: A History of the Sisters of St. Ann in Health Care in British Columbia

Today, Mount St. Mary Hospital, an extended care facility in Victoria, is one of the last visible legacies of the Sisters of St. Ann’s contributions to health care in British Columbia. But for more than...

Review by Lisa Pasolli


Book Review

The Principal’s Office – And Beyond, Volumes 1 (1849-1960) and Volume 2 (1961-2005)

This study considers the development of public education in British Columbia mainly from the perspective of school principals. The author is a prominent scholar in the field of education history and a provocative critic of...

Review by Patrick Dunae