We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (260)

Book Review

Where the Rivers Meet: Pipelines, Participatory Resource Management, and Aboriginal-State Relations in the Northwest Territories

In Where the Rivers Meet, Carly Dokis skillfully examines local responses to the Mackenzie Gas Project — a proposed natural gas pipeline through the Sahtu Region of the Northwest Territories — and how these are...

Review by Mark Stoller


Book Review

Allied Power: Mobilizing Hydro-electricity during Canada’s Second World War

In Allied Power, Matthew Evenden expertly demonstrates how private and public power commissions and corporations throughout Canada expanded hydro-electric capacity in response to the ballooning demands for power and production during the Second World War....

Review by Jonathan McQuarrie


Book Review

Carlo Gentile, Gold Rush Photographer, 1863-1866

Like most colonial-era Victoria photographers, Carlo Gentile arrived and departed with little notice. Born in Italy, he eventually found his way to California around 1860. Having reached Victoria from San Francisco in 1862, he was...

Review by David Mattison


Book Review

Patrician Liberal: The Public and Private Life of Sir Henri-Gustave Joly de Lotbinière, 1829-1908

  At first glance, a review of the biography of a nineteenth century Quebec politician seems out of place in BC Studies. Born in France in 1829 to a wealthy French Protestant father and his...

Review by Patricia E. Roy


Book Review

Vancouver Blue: A Life Against Crime

Wayne Cope joined the Vancouver Police Department (VPD) in 1975, the fulfillment of a childhood dream to be a police officer. Like most police memoirs, Cope’s is filled with anecdotal stories, some humorous and some...

Review by Bonnie Reilly Schmidt


Book Review

Names on a Cenotaph: Kootenay Lake Men in World War I

Sylvia Crooks’s Homefront and Battlefront: Nelson BC in World War II (2005) brought to life the lives of all the men honoured on the Nelson cenotaph and the impact of the war on their families...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

The Gold Will Speak For Itself: Peter Leech and Leechtown

Vancouver Island has a distinctive personality among the regions of British Columbia, one that has been shaped in complex ways by geography and history. The books reviewed here vary in their candlepower, but all of...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Book Review

An Archaeology of Asian Transnationalism

Although descriptive work on historic artifacts of Asian origin has been sporadically produced by American archaeologists since the 1960s, and by British Columbia archaeologists since the 1970s, recent years have seen a blossoming of Asian...

Review by Grant Ross Keddie


Book Review

Islands’ Spirit Rising: Reclaiming the Forests of Haida Gwaii

In Islands’ Spirit Rising: Reclaiming the Forests of Haida Gwaii, Louise Takeda challenges the dominant epistemological perspective on the politics of BC resource management in order to “[further] political and social justice” and “give back”...

Review by James Davey


Book Review

From the West Coast to the Western Front: British Columbians and the Great War

  When Mark Forsythe, host of CBC Radio’s mid-day show, BC Almanac, and journalist-producer Greg Dickson discovered that they were both involved in a personal quest to learn about great-uncles and grandfathers who had served...

Review by James Wood


Book Review

From Classroom to Battlefield: Victoria High School and the First World War

In his portrait of Victoria High School (VHS), Barry Gough has created a vivid microcosm of the First World War’s impact on Canadians. As one of Canada’s foremost historians, Gough brings a special authenticity to...

Review by James Wood


Book Review

Landscape Architecture in Canada

Landscape Architecture in Canada is Ron Williams’ magnum opus, the likely capstone of a distinguished career as researcher, teacher, and practitioner. It is a fine scholarly effort, more than fifteen years in the making. Until...

Review by Larry McCann


Book Review

Sensational Vancouver

Rumrunners, writers, aviators, architects, crooked cops, and killers are just some of the motley cast of characters populating Eve Lazarus’s Sensational Vancouver. This is her third local history book and a welcome addition to the...

Review by Lani Russwurm


Book Review

The Life and Art of Harry and Jessie Webb

Everyone has met artists who triumphed at art school, who showed some promise following graduation, but who then vanished from the art world. The Life and Art of Harry and Jessie Webb tells such a...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

Ancient Pathways, Ancestral Knowledge: Ethnobotany and Ecological Wisdom of Indigenous Peoples of Northwestern North America

Nancy Turner’s new work Ancient Pathways, Ancestral Knowledge is undoubtedly her magnum opus. It is a thing of great scope, beauty, eloquence, and cohesion. Yet perhaps its greatest attribute, like all of Turner’s work, is...

Review by Natasha Lyons


Book Review

Ladysmith: Our Community, Your Credit Union — A History

Patrick Dunae’s microhistory, Ladysmith: Our Community, Your Credit Union — A History, is attractive and approachable, and a success at what intends to be: a proudly colourful and informative history of the Ladysmith Credit Union....

Review by Patrick Craib


Book Review

Vancouver Confidential

John Belshaw undertook the task of publishing a series of fifteen essays on Vancouver written by artists, journalists, and writers. There is no specific thesis in this collection, and no attempt to convey a specific...

Review by Marcel Martel


Book Review

Historical GIS Research in Canada

This is a wonderful collection of thirteen essays, nine co-authored (twenty-seven authors all told), written by historians, geographers, librarians, archivists, cartographers, environmental scientists, and an architect, many of them acknowledging by name the other research...

Review by Deryck Holdsworth


Book Review

Buckerfield: The Story of a Vancouver Family

Buckerfield tells the story of one of Vancouver’s most important business families. The story is structured around two narrative strands. One is the business history of the family patriarch, Edward Ernest Buckerfield, the New Brunswick-born...

Review by Robert A.J. McDonald