We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (682)

New Media / Exhibition Review

A Tradition of Evolution: The Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival

Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival: Vancouver, British Columbia, 25-26 May 2017. The festival featured film and new media presentations, including a “Turtle Island Shorts” program (May 26); VR and augmented reality presentations (May 27); and...

Review by Carleigh Baker


aboriginal art

Review

Schooling in Transition: Readings in Canadian History of Education

This collection of essays is edited by Sara Burke, a historian, and Patrick Milewski, a sociologist and former elementary school teacher, at Laurentian University. The title, Schooling in Transition, reflects the editors’ belief that public...

Review by Patrick A. Dunae


Review

Chinuk Wawa: Kakwa nsayka ulman-tilixam ɬaska munk-kəmtəks nsayka/As Our Elders Teach Us To Speak It

In an obscure 1978 dissertation, a linguist named Samuel Johnson demonstrated that most of the countless Chinook Jargon lexica compiled over two hundred years form a few distinct lineages.[1] Joining the ranks of definitive dictionaries...

Review by Dave Robertson


Review

The Canadian Rangers: A Living History

Today the Canadian Rangers are noted as a unique unit within the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), created to establish a military presence in remote coastal and northern regions by utilizing mainly Aboriginal volunteers. Lackenbauer’s extensive...

Review by James Wood


Review

Arthur Erickson: An Architect’s Life

David Stouck has written a remarkable history. More than a biography, it is an encompassing account of a remarkable figure in later modern Canadian and international cultural history. Stouck recovers the spirit and material record...

Review by Rhodri Windsor-Liscombe


Review

Finding Japan: Early Canadian Encounters with Asia

Finding Japan: Early Canadian Encounters with Asia depicts stories of Canadians who went to Japan, or whose lives, dreams, achievements, and failures were intimately connected to Japan. In contrast to the far more familiar experiences...

Review by Yukari Takai


Review

Salmonbellies vs. The World: The Story of the Most Famous Team in Lacrosse & Their Greatest Rivals

In this well-researched, beautifully illustrated book W.B. MacDonald tells the story of the Salmonbellies from their founding to the present, and he does much more. He traces the evolution of lacrosse in the province, beginning...

Review by Eric Sager


Review

Truth & Indignation: Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Indian Residential Schools

The struggle to articulate Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) has seen varying degrees of success since the Commission was established in the 2006 Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement. In 2008, the Aboriginal Healing Foundation...

Review by David Gaertner


Review

Culturing Wilderness in Jasper National Park: Studies in Two Centuries of Human History in the Upper Athabasca River Watershed

In 1910, D.J. Benham wrote of the new Jasper National Park, “Here may be seen Nature primeval, Nature benignant and Nature malignant – the glorious heritage of a Canadian nation” (xxv). People don’t really talk...

Review by Claire Campbell


Review

Entangled Territorialities: Negotiating Indigenous Lands in Australia and Canada

Over the past few decades, in settler states like Australia and Canada we have seen increased recognition of the complex nature of relations between Indigenous peoples and nations, on one side, and settler groups and...

Review by Brian Egan


Review

Indigenous Men and Masculinities: Legacies, Identities, Regeneration

  Masculinity is not an easy concept to define, never mind Indigenous masculinities, and in Indigenous Men and Masculinities, co-editors Robert Innes and Kim Anderson don’t really attempt to define it. In the closing chapter,...

Review by Jean-Paul Restoule


Review

Imagining Uplands: John Olmsted’s Masterpiece of Residential Design

This is a most handsome book, and a most intelligent analysis of the dense process of realizing a design concept. Larry McCann has allowed his telling of the Uplands history to be imaginative, if not...

Review by Rhodri Windsor Liscombe


Review

Epidemic Encounters: Influenza, Society, and Culture in Canada, 1918-20

Epidemics call out the ambulance-chaser in all of us, and for health historians, there is none more attention-grabbing than the 1918-20 influenza pandemic, mistakenly dubbed the “Spanish Flu,” the only infectious disease to stop the...

Review by Megan Davies


Review

Home, Work, and Play: Situating Canadian Social History, Third Edition

Home, Work, and Play is a reader designed for university or college students studying Canadian social history. The editors have put together a diverse collection that can be used at any level from a second...

Review by John-Henry Harter


Review

UBC: The First 100 Years

With its heavy glossy paper, large format, and copious illustrations, this looks like a celebratory coffee table book. To classify it as such would be wrong. Drawing on previous histories of the University of British...

Review by Patricia Roy


Review

Captain Alex MacLean: Jack London’s Sea Wolf

Anyone who has delved into the gripping, sometimes impregnable, but always complex world of pelagic fur sealing on the north Pacific Coast knows just what a challenge the history of that subject poses. Then, to...

Review by Cary Collins


Review

Awful Splendour: A Fire History of Canada

For anyone familiar with environmental history, Stephen J. Pyne is as synonymous with the word “fire” as is Smokey the Bear. As a former firefighter in the Grand Canyon, a renowned historian at Arizona State...

Review by Philip Van Huizen


Review

Why Canadian Forestry and Mining Towns are Organized Differently: The Role of Staples in Shaping Community, Class, and Consciousness

Canada’s single industry towns (SITs), especially resource towns, continue to be the focus of considerable academic and policy attention. Canada’s population may be highly urbanized, indeed urbane, with the major metropolitan and even medium-sized urban...

Review by Roger Hayter