We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (497)

Review

Ghost Dancing with Colonialism: Decolonization and Indigenous Rights at the Supreme Court of Canada

In this book, Grace Li Xiu Woo, a retired member of the BC Bar, steps away from a standard case law analysis and instead analyzes Supreme Court decisions related to Aboriginal and treaty rights based...

Review by Hadley Friedland


Review

Finding a Way to the Heart: Feminist Writings on Aboriginal and Women’s History in Canada

As recently as forty years ago, Sylvia Van Kirk sat in the Hudson’s Bay Company Archives in London and asked a completely new question of the business papers of this iconic and long-standing company: “Where...

Review by Frieda Klippenstein


Review

On Being Here to Stay: Treaties and Aboriginal Rights in Canada

Michael Asch has enjoyed a distinguished career as an anthropologist and original thinker. In his writing he wrestles with the big questions of Indigenous/settler relations, proposes original answers, and argues his points with elegance and...

Review by Neil Vallance


Review

For King and Kanata: Canadian Indians and the First World War

Exploring the participation of Canadian First Nations in the First World War, Timothy Winegard takes aim at two historiographical problems: the tendency to simply insert Aboriginal military contributions where they have been otherwise ignored, and...

Review by Sarah Nickel


Review

Civilizing the Wilderness: Culture and Nature in Pre-Confederation Canada and Rupert’s Land

  Newcomers to Canada and Rupert’s Land in the mid-nineteenth century brought with them an assortment of cultural baggage. A. A. den Otter reveals that the twinned concepts of “civilization” and “wilderness” formed the dominant...

Review by Jonathan Clapperton


Review

Nuu-chah-nulth Voices, Histories, Objects & Journeys

NUU-CHAH-NULTH VOICES, Histories, Objects &Journeys is an anthology produced to complement Out of the Mist: HuupuKwanum—Tupaat, Treasure of the Nuu-chah-nulth Chiefs, an exhibition mounted in April 2000 by the Royal British Columbia Museum in conjunction with...

Review by Daniel Marshall


Review

Brian Jungen

The book provides an overview of the career of the artist Brian Jungen, consisting of essays by Daina Augaitis and four other notable curators — Cuauhtémoc Medina, Ralph Rugoff, Kitty Scott, and Trevor Smith. The...

Review by Geoffrey Carr


Review

From the Forest to the Sea: Emily Carr in British Columbia

Over sixty years after her death, Emily Carr has hit the international scene. It began in June 2012 when seven of her paintings were featured in Kassell, Germany’s prestigious Documenta, an art fair that showcases...

Review by Maria Tippett


New Media / Exhibition Review

In/consequential Relationships: Refusing Colonial Ethics of Engagement in Yuxweluptun’s Inherent Rights, Vision Rights

On the closing day of the Museum of Anthropology’s Unceded Territories exhibit of Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun’s art, crowds formed queues long enough to snake through the halls and to pack the exhibit space for the...

Review by Sarah King


Yuxweluptun Lawrence Paul

Review

Images from the Likeness House

At the start of Images from the Likeness House, Dan Savard tells us why the photographs he presents of Aboriginal people are important. Put succinctly, it is because of their past and continuing influence on...

Review by Jennifer Cador


Review

Recording Their Story: James Teit and the Tahltan

Judy Thompson, Canadian Museum of Civilization (CMC) Curator of Western Subarctic Ethnology, has produced a lavishly illustrated book, compelling for its quality of images, clarity of writing, and elegance of design. Seventy-one rarely published and...

Review by Jennifer Kramer


Review

The Heavens are Changing: Nineteenth-Century Protestant Missions and Tsimshian Christianity

WRITING IN Moon of Wintertime: Missionaries and the Indians of Canada in Encounter since 1534 (University of Toronto Press, 1984, 250) of seventeenth-century Jesuit missions to the Huron, John Webster Grant quoted a Huron man...

Review by J.R. Miller


Review

Voices of a Thousand People: The Makah Cultural Research Center

THE MAKAH TRIBE at Neah Bay, Washington State, has become one of the most visible and controversial Indigenous communities in North America due to the media gaze on their efforts to revive traditional whaling in...

Review by Michael Marker


Review

Missing Women, Missing News: Covering Crisis in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside

In a publication coincident with the launch of the inquiry into the police investigation of convicted serial killer Robert Pickton, David Hugill’s Missing Women, Missing News poses a vital and timely challenge to common-sense frames...

Review by Tyler McCreary


Review

Red Light Neon: A History of Vancouver’s Sex Trade

Prostitution is a complex and politically charged issue that defies simple analysis. Daniel Francis’s new book documents attempts to regulate the sex industry in Vancouver, a city where the subject has occupied a central place...

Review by Dara Culhane


Review

Where the Rivers Meet: Pipelines, Participatory Resource Management, and Aboriginal-State Relations in the Northwest Territories

In Where the Rivers Meet, Carly Dokis skillfully examines local responses to the Mackenzie Gas Project — a proposed natural gas pipeline through the Sahtu Region of the Northwest Territories — and how these are...

Review by Mark Stoller


Review

The Many Voyages of Arthur Wellington Clah: A Tsimshian Man on the Pacific North West Coast

In 1900, after almost fifty years of assiduously keeping a daily diary, Tsimshian leader and Christian, Arthur Wellington Clah, feared he was losing his sight. “But my Lord Jesus Christ push my heart to write...

Review by Penelope Edmonds


Review

He Moved a Mountain: The Life of Frank Calder and the Nisga’a Land Claims Award

Like others over the course of history who have influenced fundamental human rights change, Frank Arthur Calder seems to have been born to that grand purpose. Calder’s Nisga’a elders accurately foresaw that he was destined...

Review by Katherine Palmer Gordon


Review

Maker of Monsters: The Extraordinary Life of Beau Dick

The recent passing of Beau Dick makes this documentary film both a testament and an affirmation of an extraordinary life. More than a recitation of the chronology of his life, the filmmakers have created a...

Review by Michelle McGeough