We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (161)

Book Review

When Coal Was King: Ladysmith in the Coal-Mining Industry on Vancouver Island

WHEN COAL WAS KING, Ladysmith was a small, undistinguished pit-town, one of thousands around the industrializingworld. On the eve of the Great War, Ladysmith’s population barely passed 3,200. Compared with Nanaimo or Cumberland, let alone...

Review by John Belshaw


Book Review

The Intemperate Rainforest: Nature, Culture and Power on

WHAT IS IT THAT MAKES dancers yearn to sing or painters to write? Why are academics fundamentally unhappy within their disciplines? Inside each academician there seems to be an alter ego struggling to get out....

Review by H.V. Nelles


Book Review

From the Baltic to Russian America, 1829-1836

ALIX O’GRADY’S From the Baltic to Russian America, 1829-1836 should be of interest to BC historians concerned with the broader aspects of the Pacific Slopes fur trade in general and of Russian colonial history in particular. O’Grady,...

Review by Bruce Watson


Book Review

Royal City: A Photographic History of New Westminster, 1858-1960

Today, many residents of the Lower Mainland know New Westminster only as the site of traffic jams as they wait to get on to the Pattullo, the Queensborough, and Alex Fraser bridges; Highway 401; or...

Review by Patricia Roy


Book Review

Harbour City: Nanaimo in Transition, 1920-1967

Nanaimo is a perplexing place for a historian. The city’s elected officials and first Nations leaders often disregard and frequently disdain historical structures. Recently, two buildings that had been listed on the city’s heritage register...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Book Review

Authentic Indians: Episodes of Encounter from the Late Nineteenth-Century Northwest Coast

Authentic Indians examines the pressure exerted on a minority to conform to an ideal that the majority defined by another ideal – in short, two abstractions played off one another. Paige Raibmon calls this a...

Review by Brian Dippie


Book Review

Gently to Nagasaki

Joy Kogawa’s place in literary history has been secure since 1981, when Obasan swayed more hearts and minds than art can generally hope to do. Told from the point of view of a six-year-old girl,...

Review by Susan Knutson


Book Review

The Life and Art of Arthur Pitts

Kerry Mason begins The Life and Art of Arthur Pitts with a question: ‘Why haven’t I heard about this artist?’ (x) By the end of the book the reader is persuaded that we should indeed...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

The W̲SÁNEĆ and Their Neighbours: Diamond Jenness on the Coast Salish of Vancouver Island, 1935

Anthropologist Rolf Knight launched a new chapter of Indigenous history in 1978 with the publication of his book, Indians at Work: An Informal History of Native Indian Labour in British Columbia, 1858-1930.[1]  In contrast to...

Review by Wendy Wickwire


Book Review

Maximum Canada: Why 35 Million Canadians Are Not Enough

Anyone with even the most superficial knowledge of eugenics, racism, the ‘domestication’ of women, and the history of the 20th century will know why pronatalism might ring the wrong bells. And this is setting aside...

Review by John Douglas Belshaw


Book Review

Everything Shuswap

In 1969, Jim Cooperman arrived in British Columbia from the United States, one of many Vietnam ‘war resisters’ who remade our province in ways that few people yet fully appreciate.  One was in building a...

Review by Michael M’Gonigle


Book Review

Sister Soldiers of the Great War: The Nurses of the Canadian Army Medical Corps

During the First World War, 2,845 women enlisted as lieutenant nursing sisters in the Canadian Army Medical Corps (CAMC) (39), but over the ensuing century their experiences of service have largely gone untold. They comprised...

Review by Sarah Glassford


Book Review

Christy Clark: Behind the Smile

According to Judi Tyabji this is “not an authorized biography. In fact, it’s not really a biography at all because she’s still premier.” Rather, it is “a book about Premier Clark written by someone who...

Review by Patricia Roy


Book Review

The Life and Art of Jack Akroyd

Peter Busby’s The Life and Art of Jack Akroyd is the eighth and latest book in the Unheralded Artists Series presented by Mother Tongue Publishing. The series as a whole makes a significant contribution to...

Review by Kerry Mason


Book Review

The Salish Sea: Jewel of the Pacific Northwest

Audrey DeLella Benedict and Joseph Gaydos’s book about the Salish Sea, like Beamish and McFarlane’s recent tome on the Strait of Georgia (or North Salish Sea), The Sea Among Us, is a gorgeously illustrated and...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

Arctic Ambitions: Captain Cook and the Northwest Passage

James Cook was the greatest navigator of his, and perhaps any, age. He did more than any other individual to make the Pacific, which covers one third of the earth’s surface, known to Europe. Through...

Review by Robin Fisher


Book Review

Through an Unknown Country: The Jarvis-Hanington Winter Expedition through the Northern Rockies, 1874-1875

This miscellany of writings, chiefly by two civil engineers who for parts of their careers  toiled as railway surveyors, aims to carve out a prominent place for them in the history of Canada. Ed Jarvis...

Review by I.S. MacLaren


Book Review

Striving for Environmental Sustainability in a Complex World: Canadian Experiences

The title suggests a broad discussion of sustainability, with Canadian examples.  The core of this book, however, is about “Canadian experiences” with Man and Biosphere Reserves (sic) or MAB, and Model Forests.  Francis was an...

Review by Zoë A. Meletis


Book Review

A Matter of Confidence: The Inside Story of the Political Battle for BC

In February of 2011, I was the moderator for the BC Liberal Leadership candidates’ debate in Prince George, British Columbia. As the evening got underway I saw Christy Clark enter the room. She caught my...

Review by Tracy Summerville


Book Review

Death in the Peaceable Kingdom: Canadian History since 1867 Through Murder, Execution, Assassination and Suicide

Two decades ago, a prominent conservative academic smacked down Canadian university instructors with the provocatively-titled Who Killed Canadian History? J.L. Granatstein’s answer was, in part, social history and the historians who taught it. Social historian...

Review by Larry Hannant


Book Review

Uncharted Waters: The Explorations of José Narváez (1768–1840)

Jim McDowell’s Uncharted Waters: The Explorations of José Narváez is a comprehensive examination of one of the most important and overlooked explorers of the Pacific Coast during the late eighteenth century. McDowell traces Narváez’s long career from his...

Review by Devon Drury


Book Review

Train Master: The Railway Art of Max Jacquiard

Train Master: The Railway Art of Max Jacquiard, the new book by the noted transportation historian Barry Sanford, looks at British Columbian railways from 1925 to 1955, as depicted in ninety-nine paintings by Jacquiard. The...

Review by Ian Pooley