We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (532)

Book Review

Pro-Family Politics and Fringe Parties in Canada

One of the most contentious aspects of politics is the legislation of morals. How much should governments be beholden to any one set of religious beliefs held by influential minorities or a major ity? Chris...

Review by John Dyck


Book Review

Into the House of Old: A History of Residential Care in British Columbia

Megan Davies’s carefully worked study on residential care for the aged in British Columbia does in deed take us into the “house of old.” And it is a sad journey, made more resonant to many...

Review by Patricia Vertinsky


Book Review

Second Growth: Community Economic Development in Rural British Columbia

Recently the CBC program Ideas aired “Canadian Clearances,” a documentary about the impacts of globalization in rural Canada.1 What has come to epitomize the political activism of rural and remote communities is the depth of...

Review by Tracy Summerville


Book Review

Stanley Park’s Secret: The Forgotten Families of Whoi Whoi, Kanaka Ranch and Brockton Point

Jean Barman brings clarity to a long misunderstood part of the early history of Vancouver and British Columbia. Building upon earlier re-search on Stanley Park by William C. McKee (Urban History Review 3 [1978]), Robert...

Review by Sean Kheraj


Book Review

Dream City: Vancouver and the Global Imagination

Dream City. The title is captivating, but what does it mean? Lance Berelowitz’s book about changes in the urban design and planning of Vancouver opens and closes by briefly discussing the phrase “dream city,” but...

Review by Lawrence McCann


Book Review

The Wheel Keeper

In The Wheel Keeper , first-time novelist Robert Pepper-Smith, an instructor at Malaspina University College in Nanaimo, British Columbia, has written an engaging and often enchanting tale that draws heavily on three generations of the...

Review by Gabriele Scardellato


Book Review

Danger, Death and Disaster in the Crowsnest Pass Mines, 1902-28

The Crowsnest Pass coal-mining communities serve as the backdrop for Karen Buckley’s study of danger, death, and disaster. Her objective is to examine personal and community responses to death and to “gain a clearer understanding...

Review by Andrew Yarmie


Book Review

Nationalism from the Margins: Italians in Alberta and British Columbia

According to Patricia Wood, ethnic studies in Canada – or at least the study of Italian immigrants and their descendants – is at best a marginal or fringe activity in the Canadian academy. She complains,...

Review by Gabriele Scardellato


Book Review

Atlas of Pacific Salmon

Journalist Timothy Egan once wrote that the Pacific Northwest “is wherever the salmon can get to.” As woefully provincial as he was, Egan unwittingly revealed the absence of an alternative way to regionalize the seven...

Review by Joseph Taylor


Book Review

Vanishing British Columbia

Recently, while speeding along West Broadway on a Number 99 bus, the older gentleman sitting next to me mused that so many buildings have been demolished that young people would soon have no idea of...

Review by Jill Wade


Book Review

Healing in the Wilderness: A History of the United Church Mission Hospitals

In Healing in the Wilderness Bob Burrows recounts the origins and evolution of the medical missions established and maintained by the United Church and its antecedents in isolated communities across Canada. An ordained United Church...

Review by Norman Knowles


Book Review

Watara- Dori (Birds of Passage)

WATARA-DORI (Birds of Passage) is a biographical fiction of a half-year period (24 June 1915 to 1 January 1916) in the life of a Japanese-Canadian fisher. Mitsuo Yesaki has a thorough knowledge of the Pacific coast fisheries,...

Review by Michiko Ayukawa


Book Review

Songhees Pictorial: A History of the Songhees People as Seen by Outsiders, 1790-1912

This is a wonderful addition to the history of Aboriginal peoples in British Columbia and Canada. It is unusual because it takes images as the starting point and valuable because the people upon whom it...

Review by John Lutz


Book Review

Negotiated Memory: Doukhobor Autobiographical Discourse

In Negotiated Memory: Doukhobor Autobiographical Discourse) Julie Rak refers to Doukhobors as “bad subjects,” drawing on a concept formulated by Louis Althusser to describe a people who “resist the institutions, laws, and beliefs that would make...

Review by Myler Wilkinson


Book Review

Wires in the Wilderness: The Story of the Yukon Telegraph

IT WAS WITH SOME excitement and a little trepidation that I agreed to review Bill Miller’s book. First of all, my father, George Ball, was a Yukon Telegraph Line operator in the early years; and...

Review by Georgiana Ball


Book Review

Academic Freedom and the Inclusive University

THIS BOOK SUCCEEDS in exemplifying what it fails to define. It contains seventeen chapters written by academics from the United States and Canada – academics who occupy a variety of positions: college teacher, university administrator,...

Review by Gordon Shrimpton


Book Review

Native Seattle: Histories from the Crossing-Over Place

Coll Thrush’s book lies at the intersection of two bodies of scholarship that usually run parallel to each other. Urban history and Indian history meet in Native Seattle with panache and authority. Thrush tracks the...

Review by Jean Barman


Book Review

Winging Home: A Palette of Birds

At the risk of categorizing an uncategorizable book, I feel compelled to acknowledge a trend among “nature poets” in Canada that sees many of them exploring in nonfiction prose what they typically reserve for poetry....

Review by Travis Mason


Book Review

Guardians of the Wild: A History of the Warden Service of Canada’s National Parks

PDF – Murton Review Essay, BC Studies 136, Winter 2002/03

Review by Mike Schintz


Book Review

The Last Island: A Naturalist’s Sojourn on Triangle Island

ONE OF THE SALIENT features of British Columbia’s geography is its myriad coastal islands. Among the wildest and most remote of these, the ecological reserve Triangle Island lies in the open Pacific Ocean thirty miles...

Review by Philip Teece