We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (310)

Book Review

Métis in Canada: History, Identity, Law and Politics

A decade has passed since R v Powley determined that the Métis in Sault Ste. Marie have an Aboriginal right to hunt, and we are still coming to terms with its significance. The multidisciplinary collection...

Review by Jennifer Hayter


Book Review

Creating Space: My Life and Work in Indigenous Education

There is no such thing as Indigenous education. There is only cross-cultural education containing negotiations between both Indigenous people and the settler societies that colonized them. Understanding the past is essential, but even if we...

Review by Michael Marker


Book Review

Chinookan Peoples of the Lower Columbia

The study of indigenous history is fundamentally interdisciplinary and benefits, as Chinookan Peoples of the Lower Columbia illustrates, from consideration of different forms of data from a range of disciplinary and cultural perspectives. The challenge...

Review by Andrew Martindale


Book Review

British Columbia: A New Historical Atlas

  In British Columbia: A New Historical Atlas, Derek Hayes uses over 900 contemporary maps to illustrate the history of British Columbia. The maps are beautifully reproduced, carefully analyzed in captions, often supported by useful...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

Indigenous Peoples of North America: A Concise Anthropological Overview

Robert Muckle has responded to the market place need for a concise textbook treatment of the lives and circumstances of the Indigenous peoples of North America. Previous works are too long, too detailed, and unreadable...

Review by Bruce Miller


Book Review

Vancouver Anthology

During the 1960s things radically changed in the Canadian art world. Aesthetic categories expanded to include technically based video and multimedia performance art. Traditional art institutions competed with artist-run centres like The Sound Gallery and...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

Life in the Tee-Pee

In the spring of 1956, the proprietors of the roadside Tee-Pee Restaurant near Boston Bar were unceremoniously informed that their business and odd assortment of buildings would be expropriated and destroyed to make way for...

Review by Ian Mosby


Book Review

Nooksack Place Names: Geography, Culture, and Language

Place names have an incalculable value. A name can tie together the particularities of language, history, and tradition. Allan Richardson and Brent Galloway have compiled place-names in Nooksack territory. It’s the result of many years...

Review by Bill Angelbeck


Book Review

For King and Kanata: Canadian Indians and the First World War

Exploring the participation of Canadian First Nations in the First World War, Timothy Winegard takes aim at two historiographical problems: the tendency to simply insert Aboriginal military contributions where they have been otherwise ignored, and...

Review by Sarah Nickel


Book Review

The True Story of Canada’s “War” of Extermination on the Pacific plus The Tsilhqot’in and Other First Nations Resistance

One should always be skeptical of books when the title proclaims them to be the “true story” on any aspect of history. For truth, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder. Tom Swanky’s...

Review by Robin Fisher


Book Review

Native Claims: Indigenous Law Against Empire, 1500-1920

This major interdisciplinary study shatters the illusion that only Europeans contributed to modern legal debate about the legitimacy of empire and nature of imperial sovereignty and colonial possession. The basic – twofold — premise of...

Review by Daniel Clayton


Book Review

Emily Carr: Collected

Two weeks after Emily Carr’s death on 3 March 1945, former Group of Seven artist, Lawren Harris, travelled from his home in Vancouver to Victoria. As the artistic executor of Carr’s estate it fell upon...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

No Longer Captives of the Past: The story of a Reconciliation on Erromango

No Longer Captives of the Past is an important book for two reasons. It offers an excellent case study of modern day reconciliation remediating past wrongs, and it reminds us how, in this interconnected world,...

Review by Jean Barman


Book Review

Seeing Red: A History of Natives in Canadian Newspapers

Seeing Red is a tough read. It’s tough because the sheer amount of data gathered from Canadian newspapers ends up, at times, reading like endless lists of information, rather than a coherent narrative, argument, or...

Review by Hadley Friedland


Book Review

Asserting Native Resilience: Pacific Rim Indigenous Nations Face the Climate Crisis

For the past five centuries, Indigenous people of the Pacific Rim have been on the receiving, destructive end of European expansion and technology, witnessing their lands occupied by extractive, industrialized nation states. Now assimilated into...

Review by Chris Arnett


Book Review

Father August Brabant: Saviour or Scourge?

The numerous European men and fewer women who travelled overseas to spread a particular brand of Christianity among distant peoples in the nineteenth century are a perennial source of interest among scholars — and for...

Review by Nicholas May


Book Review

More English than the English: A Very Social History of Victoria

  In “Tracing the Fortunes of Five Founding Families of Victoria” (BC Studies 115/116 1998/1999), Sylvia Van Kirk revealed the mixed cultural background of some of Victoria’s most important settler families (the Douglases, Tods, Works,...

Review by Terry Reksten


Book Review

Home Truths: Highlights from BC History

As co-editors of BC Studies, Richard Mackie and Graeme Wynn surveyed all the essays published in the journal since it first appeared in 1968 before deciding to focus on what they concluded were two dominant...

Review by J.I. Little


Book Review

First Person Plural: Aboriginal Storytelling and the Ethics of Collaborative Authorship

While Sophie McCall’s book is aimed primarily at readers of Aboriginal literary studies, she hopes that her book also will be of interest to “scholars investigating the problem of textualizing Aboriginal oral narrative.” This review...

Review by Neil Vallance


Book Review

Civilizing the Wilderness: Culture and Nature in Pre-Confederation Canada and Rupert’s Land

  Newcomers to Canada and Rupert’s Land in the mid-nineteenth century brought with them an assortment of cultural baggage. A. A. den Otter reveals that the twinned concepts of “civilization” and “wilderness” formed the dominant...

Review by Jonathan Clapperton


Book Review

The Many Voyages of Arthur Wellington Clah: A Tsimshian Man on the Pacific North West Coast

In 1900, after almost fifty years of assiduously keeping a daily diary, Tsimshian leader and Christian, Arthur Wellington Clah, feared he was losing his sight. “But my Lord Jesus Christ push my heart to write...

Review by Penelope Edmonds


Book Review

A Wilder West: Rodeo in Western Canada

This is a book about people in small towns in the west, and the rodeos that have provided ways to negotiate their complex social, economic, and cultural relationships with each other and with the animals...

Review by J. Chamberlin