We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (678)

Book Review

Valley Sutra

Kuldip Gill’s Valley Sutra is a posthumous volume, assembled by the author shortly before her death in 2009. This vibrant, accessible collection with its “iridescent shimmers” is also divided into two parts, with the author’s...

Review by David Stouck


Book Review

Municipalities and Multiculturalism: The Politics of Immigration in Toronto and Vancouver

Kristin R. Good, a political scientist, accomplished two main objectives in this book: (1) investigating how and why municipalities responded to dramatic changes in their ethno-cultural composition and (2) evaluating her findings about municipal multicultural...

Review by Patricia Roy


Book Review

Greenscapes: Olmsted’s Pacific Northwest

This book is about John Charles Olmsted, the nephew cum stepson of Frederick Law Olmsted Sr., the renowned landscape architect of New York’s Central Park. The senior Olmsted created an urban plan for Tacoma in...

Review by Larry McCann


Book Review

Voices of British Columbia: Stories from Our Frontier

Robert Budd has done us all a tremendous favour by turning serious attention to the almost thousand interviews CBC journalist Imbert Orchard conducted with a wide range of British Columbians between 1959 and 1966. The...

Review by Jean Barman


Book Review

Treaty Talks in British Columbia: Building a New Relationship 3rd edition

The onset of modern treaty negotiations in British Columbia, in 1993, was greeted with a good measure of optimism. The treaty process, it was hoped, would resolve the long-standing “Indian land question,” meeting both First...

Review by Brian Egan


Book Review

Aboriginal Title and Indigenous Peoples: Canada, Australia, and New Zealand

“It is inconceivable, I think,” asserted Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau in 1969, “that in a given society, one section of the society have a treaty with the other section of the society. We must be...

Review by Cairns Alan


Book Review

The Business of Women: Marriage, Family, and Entrepreneurship in British Columbia, 1901-1951

  Despite the rich historiography of women and work in Canada, we know very little about the history of female self-employment in this country. Historians have tended to focus on women who worked for wages,...

Review by Tina Block


Book Review

The Final Forest: Big Trees, Forks, and the Pacific Northwest

Telling the story of the timber wars in the national forests of the Pacific Northwest is a task that has moved from journalism to history, William Dietrich suggests in this 2010 edition of The Final...

Review by Emily Davis


Book Review

Speaking for a Long Time: Public Space and Social Memory in Vancouver

  Mike Davis claims that ours is a time when the lived geographies of privilege and marginality intersect with an ever-diminishing regularity [1]. If he is right, then critical urban research that attempts to understand how new...

Review by David Hugill


Book Review

Interventions: Native American Art for Far-flung Territories

  Judith Ostrowitz skilfully investigates the complex and innovative strategies used by First Nations artists since the 1950s to engage with museum, art gallery, restoration, and tourist initiatives. She shows how various individuals and groups...

Review by Leslie Dawn


Book Review

Wicihitowin: Aboriginal Social Work in Canada

“Wicihitowin” is a Cree word that describes the collective processes involved in helping/sharing with one another, and that is what the eleven First Nations, Métis, and Inuit social work educators across Canada have done with...

Review by Shelly Johnson


Book Review

Burlesque West: Showgirls, Sex, and Sin in Postwar Vancouver

Feather boas and glamorous stage shows, breast implants and stripper poles: these images of postwar Vancouver nightlife in Burlesque West reflect the contradictory cultural status of striptease. Although striptease was defined by various experts as...

Review by Lara Campbell


Book Review

Writing British Columbia History, 1784-1958

Historiography may seem like a dry, pedantic exercise that would only attract a handful of readers. Add to that the seeming lack of history that the subject of British Columbia suggests. But a recent addition...

Review by Ken Favrholdt


Book Review

The Encyclopedia of Raincoast Place Names: A Complete Reference to Coastal British Columbia

The publication of Andrew Scott’s The Encyclopedia of Raincoast Place Names: A Complete Reference to Coastal British Columbia in 2009 both commemorates the one hundredth anniversary of Captain John T. Walbran’s British Columbia Coast Names...

Review by Mark Diotte


Book Review

UBC: The First 100 Years

With its heavy glossy paper, large format, and copious illustrations, this looks like a celebratory coffee table book. To classify it as such would be wrong. Drawing on previous histories of the University of British...

Review by Patricia Roy


Book Review

The Manly Modern: Masculinity in Postwar Canada

Theorists of modernity have often been particularly blind to the roles of gender. In numerous otherwise thought-provoking theoretical works on modernity, gender either disappears from the analysis or is treated awkwardly. Historians, to a degree,...

Review by Jarrett Rudy


Book Review

Native Peoples and Water Rights: Irrigation, Dams, and the Law in Western Canada

Making the jump from studies of static property such as land to the fluid resource of water, Kenichi Matsui’s Native Peoples and Water Rights explores new territory by examining the intersection of Aboriginal rights and...

Review by Jenny Clayton


Book Review

Family Origin Histories: The Whaling Indians: West Coast Legends and Stories, Part 11 of the Sapir-Thomas Nootka Texts

What do the stories of lineage significance say about the people who tell them? What is culturally salient to the tellers of the stories? What is culturally salient to the hearers of the stories, be...

Review by Marlene Atleo


Book Review

Living Proof: The Essential Data-Collection Guide for Indigenous Use-and-Occupancy Map Surveys

Do maps speak for themselves? Terry Tobias insists that indigenous land use and occupancy maps must speak loudly and clearly, and he demonstrates that they can if rigorous research and methodological standards are followed. Tobias...

Review by Thomas McIlwraith