We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (542)

Review

Becoming British Columbia: A Population History

If Canada, as William Lyon Mackenzie King once quipped, has too much geography, John Belshaw might well reply that Canadian historiography has too little demography. Regional historical writing, including that found in British Columbia, has...

Review by Forrest Pass


Review

Mountain Timber: The Comox Logging Company in the Vancouver Island Mountains

Richard Mackie’s Mountain Timber is the second volume of a projected three-volume history of the Comox Logging and Railway Company’s operations on Vancouver Island. This volume begins c.1927 with the company’s expansion of its steam-powered...

Review by Christopher Hanna


Review

Nature’s Northwest: The North Pacific Slope in the Twentieth Century

In Nature’s Northwest, William G. Robbins and Katrine Barber have synthesized a wealth of scholarship on the Greater Northwest, encompassing Idaho, Oregon, Washington, western Montana, and southern British Columbia. The authors track social, economic, political,...

Review by Richard Rajala


Review

Liberalism, Surveillance, and Resistance: Indigenous Communities in Western Canada, 1877-1927

The negotiation and signing of the numbered treaties with First Nations groups in Western Canada, followed shortly thereafter by the opening of the territory to Euro-Canadian settlement, served to consolidate the country’s sovereignty over the...

Review by Heather Devine


Review

Bruce McDonald’s “Hard Core Logo”

Although it’s one of the three major production sites In Canada, surprisingly few memorable movies have actually been made in Vancouver. Even lonely Winnipeg has fared better in this regard, with cinematic mythologizer Guy Maddin...

Review by Mark Harris


Review

Swift and Strong: The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught’s Own). A Pictorial History

Having dedicated Swift and Strong “To all Dukes, past, present and future,” the authors of this outstanding volume have successfully commemorated the life and times of the British Columbia Regiment (BCR), Duke of Connaught’s Own, a Vancouver-based...

Review by James Wood


Review

Tales of Ghosts: First Nations Art in British Columbia, 1922-61

THE HISTORIOGRAPHIC trends in the scholarly literature pertaining to First Nations material and visual culture have leaned primarily towards stylistic analysis, connoisseurship, and tracing the rise, decline, and “renaissance” of this production. Ronald Hawker’s book,...

Review by Megan Smetzer


Review

Conrad Kain: Letters from a Wandering Mountain Guide, 1906-1933

Few figures in the history of western Canadian mountaineering are held in such high regard as Conrad Kain. Arriving in Banff in 1909 to work for the young Alpine Club of Canada (ACC), Kain came...

Review by David A. Rossiter


Review

War-Torn Exchanges: The Lives and Letters of Nursing Sisters Laura Holland and Mildred Forbes

For four turbulent years (June 1915 to May 1919) Nursing Sisters Laura Holland and Mildred Forbes served together in the Canadian Army Medical Corps, taking on new administrative and bedside nursing roles in joint postings...

Review by C.M. Haney


Review

Climber’s Paradise: Making Canada’s Mountain Parks, 1906-1974

Two powerful and iconic institutions can be found at the centre of most histories of tourism and recreation in the mountains of western Canada: the Canadian Pacific Railway and the agency known today as Parks...

Review by Ben Bradley


Review

Negotiations in a Vacant Lot: Studying the Visual in Canada

This book changes how we should think about visual culture and art history in Canada. By focusing on how the visual has been shaped by liberal and neo-liberal ideologies of individualism, property rights, and progress...

Review by John O’Brian


Review

Contact Zones: Aboriginal and Settler Women in Canada’s Colonial Past

This is a great time to be writing Aboriginal history. A decade of productive interplay between postcolonial studies, feminist analysis, and new methods of research has opened new interpretive pathways to historians of First Nations....

Review by Mary-Ellen Kelm


Review

Witness to Loss

Witness to Loss is a multi-authored study of wartime Japanese Canadian confinement that draws from the memoirs of Kishizo Kimura, a Japanese-born man who immigrated to Canada in 1911. Kimura had an important impact on the...

Review by Christian Roy


Review

The Chinchaga Firestorm: When the Moon and Sun Turned Blue

Some fires are justly renowned. Some are celebrities — known for being known. A few are famous for being unknown. The 1871 Peshtigo fire in the US has long marketed itself as America’s Forgotten Fire....

Review by Stephen J. Pyne


Review

How Canadians Communicate V: Sports

The strength of How Canadians Communicate V: Sports is in its storytelling. Exploring Canadian engagement through sports and the media, the authors demonstrate that a powerful story attracts both spectators and readers. Written from multiple...

Review by Jennifer Anderson


Review

From Classroom to Battlefield: Victoria High School and the First World War

In his portrait of Victoria High School (VHS), Barry Gough has created a vivid microcosm of the First World War’s impact on Canadians. As one of Canada’s foremost historians, Gough brings a special authenticity to...

Review by James Wood


Review

The Nature of Gold: An Environmental History of the Klondike Gold Rush

THE NATURE OF GOLD is in several ways a path-breaking work since, although there is a large literature on Yukon environment, there has been very little written on the environmental history of the Territory, and...

Review by William Morrison


Review

Citizen Docker: Making a New Deal on the Vancouver Waterfront 1919-1939

In Citizen Docker Andrew Parnaby explores industrial relations on the Vancouver waterfront during the interwar years. The analysis is linked to a broader consideration of the transition to the welfare state and the new industrial...

Review by Gordon Hak


Review

The Gold Will Speak For Itself: Peter Leech and Leechtown

Vancouver Island has a distinctive personality among the regions of British Columbia, one that has been shaped in complex ways by geography and history. The books reviewed here vary in their candlepower, but all of...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Review

Who Killed Janet Smith?

In late July 1924 in a house in the upper crust neighbourhood of Shaughnessy Heights, Vancouver, around midday, a Scots nursemaid was found dead in the basement by the Chinese “house boy,” Wing Fong Sing....

Review by John McLaren


Review

Women on Ice: The Early Years of Women’s Hockey in Western Canada

In January 1997 the Gateway, the University of Alberta’s student newspaper, reported on the first game played by the Pandas, the women’s hockey team: “it was fascinating to watch these women playing their hearts out,...

Review by David Mills


Review

Soviet Princeton: Slim Evans and the 1932-33 Miners’ Strike

Arthur “Slim” Evans has long been a notable figure in Canadian labour history, most often associated with the famed On-to-Ottawa Trek that he led in 1935 in an effort to improve conditions in the relief...

Review by Ron Verzuh


Review

British Columbia: Land of Promises

This delightful book is Volume 5 of Oxford University Press’s six-volume Illustrated History of Canada. As the authors note in the introduction, the series is “uniquely Canadian” because the volumes are not shaped by chronology...

Review by Robert Campbell