We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (102)

Book Review

The Fur Trade Gamble: North West Company on the Pacific Slope, 1800-1820

This is not the first nor will be it the last scholarly or non-scholarly work on the North West Company’s ill-fated “Columbia adventure,” an enterprise in frustration for the investors and participants, both by land...

Review by Barry Gough


Book Review

Bringing Water to Victoria: An Illustrated History, 1843-1915

Little is as intimate and political as the water that flows from city taps. We fill our bodies with it, we wash our babies in it. Many of us depend on the state to provide...

Review by Adele Perry


Book Review

Aqueduct: Colonialism, Resources, and the Histories We Remember

If, as Adele Perry suggests, history is cacophony, then the opening of Winnipeg’s Canadian Museum of Human Rights (CMHR) in September 2014 was bound to be discordant. Camped outside the CMHR, Anishinaabe from Shoal Lake...

Review by Dylan Burrows


Book Review

Edmonton House Journals, Correspondence and Reports: 1806-1821

This volume assembles the remaining records (with the exception of accounts) produced between 1806 and 1821 at Edmonton House, the Saskatchewan District headquarters of the Hudson’s Bay Company. This period starts with the 1806 Lewis...

Review by Jamie Morton


Book Review

Watershed Moments: A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District

Those who would wish to time-travel to the Comox Valley of the First World War era need only to walk the streets of today’s Courtenay downtown core. There they will encounter numerous large publicly-displayed photographs...

Review by Dan Hinman-Smith


Book Review

The Literary Storefront: The Glory Years: Vancouver’s Literary Centre 1978-1985

Few bookstores figure prominently in modern literary history. Shakespeare and Company in Paris, once frequented by Joyce, Stein, Fitzgerald, and Hemingway, and City Lights in San Francisco, made famous by Ginsberg and Kerouac, are shrines...

Review by Nicholas Bradley


Book Review

Spirits of the Rockies: Reasserting an Indigenous Presence in Banff National Park

The history of Indigenous peoples and parks — notably their exclusion from such places — is a field of study that has blossomed over the past two decades. Courtney Mason’s Spirits of the Rockies: Reasserting...

Review by Jonathan Clapperton


Book Review

Seeking Our Eden: The Dreams and Migrations of Sarah Jameson Craig

Sarah Jameson Craig was born in 1840 in St Andrews, New Brunswick, a descendant of United Empire Loyalists, and she grew up in a log cabin in the isolated backwoods with no local post office...

Review by Lindsey McMaster


Book Review

Governing Transboundary Waters: Canada, the United States, and Indigenous Communities

Most of the world’s water basins are transborder. The vast majority of North America’s surface freshwater falls within a border watershed. Indeed, contemporary water governance within just one country is already complex enough — overlaying...

Review by Daniel Macfarlane


Book Review

The Gold Will Speak For Itself: Peter Leech and Leechtown

Vancouver Island has a distinctive personality among the regions of British Columbia, one that has been shaped in complex ways by geography and history. The books reviewed here vary in their candlepower, but all of...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Book Review

Bootleggers and Borders: The Paradox of Prohibition on a Canada-US Borderland

Given how contentious relations between Canada and the US became during the American Prohibition era (1917-1933), it is surprising how little scholarly work has been done on the subject. There are many popular books about...

Review by Daniel Francis


Book Review

The Elusive Mr. Pond: The Soldier, Fur Trader and Explorer who Opened the Northwest

Barry Gough has masterfully grappled with the challenge of interpreting an important figure in the Canadian fur trade in his book, The Elusive Mr. Pond: The Soldier, Fur Trader and Explorer who Opened the Northwest....

Review by George Colpitts


Book Review

The Life and Art of Harry and Jessie Webb

Everyone has met artists who triumphed at art school, who showed some promise following graduation, but who then vanished from the art world. The Life and Art of Harry and Jessie Webb tells such a...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

Ladysmith: Our Community, Your Credit Union — A History

Patrick Dunae’s microhistory, Ladysmith: Our Community, Your Credit Union — A History, is attractive and approachable, and a success at what intends to be: a proudly colourful and informative history of the Ladysmith Credit Union....

Review by Patrick Craib


Book Review

Walhachin: Birth of a Legend

Walhachin has a particular resonance for many British Columbians. Because of this, certain aspects of the Walhachin story have acquired a permanency and legitimacy that are not supported by what actually happened at this Edwardian orchard...

Review by Dennis Oomen


Book Review

Boundless Optimism: Richard McBride’s British Columbia

Patricia E. Roy’s Boundless Optimism: Richard McBride’s British Columbia examines the political career of one of the province’s most significant premiers. Born in New Westminster in 1870 and educated at New Westminster High School and...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

Enlightened Zeal: The Hudson’s Bay Company and Scientific Networks, 1670–1870

A Strange and Dangerovs Voyage (1633) was published by command of King Charles I after Thomas James (c.1593-1635) returned from overwintering in James Bay. Dead by 1635, James had nothing to do with the founding...

Review by I.S. MacLaren